152 episodes

Making connections through conversation with the art, literature, and creative work that matters to us, and the people who make it. Hosted by writer and photographer Mike Sakasegawa, Keep the Channel Open is a series of in-depth and intimate conversations with artists, writers, and curators from across the creative spectrum.

Keep the Channel Open Mike Sakasegawa

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 36 Ratings

Making connections through conversation with the art, literature, and creative work that matters to us, and the people who make it. Hosted by writer and photographer Mike Sakasegawa, Keep the Channel Open is a series of in-depth and intimate conversations with artists, writers, and curators from across the creative spectrum.

    Molly Spencer

    Molly Spencer

    Molly Spencer is a poet based in Michigan. The poems in her collections In the House and Hinge engage with chronic illness, divorce, domesticity, motherhood, and the ways that our lives don’t always work out the way we expected them to. In our conversation, we talked about dissolution, the uses of poetry, ways of knowing, and speaking unlovely truths. Then for the second section, we talked about attention—both the kind of attention we’d like to cultivate in our own lives, and what kind of attention we ask of our readers.
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    Show Notes: Molly Spencer Purchase If the House: Literati (Ann Arbor, MI) | The Book Catapult (San Diego, CA) | Bookshop Purchase Hinge: Literati (Ann Arbor, MI) | The Book Catapult (San Diego, CA) | Bookshop Emily Dickinson - “Make me a picture of the sun” Etel Adnan - Sea and Fog Wallace Stevens - “The Snow Man” Susan Glaspell - “A Jury of Her Peers” Molly Spencer - “On ‘Most Accidents Occur At Home’” Mary Oliver - “Yes! No!” Solmaz Sharif - Customs Dionne Brand - Nomenclature Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Luther Hughes

    Luther Hughes

    Luther Hughes is a poet based in Seattle, WA. The poems in Luther’s debut collection, A Shiver in the Leaves, are tender, erotic, vulnerable, erudite, at times dark, and at times ecstatic. In our conversation, we talked about power dynamics in sexual encounters, different forms of love, and writing as a way of understanding oneself. Then in the second section, we talked about why so many sex scenes in popular media are so strange.
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    Show Notes: Luther Hughes Purchase A Shiver in the Leaves: Open Books (Seattle, WA) | The Book Catapult (San Diego, CA) | Bookshop.org Brooklyn Poets Reading Series - Luther Hughes, Lynn Melnick, Carl Phillips The Poet Salon Lue’s Poetry Hour Luther Hughes - “On Power” Seattle Times - “Seattle poet Luther Hughes on ‘A Shiver in the Leaves,’ his debut collection” Brandon Taylor - Real Life Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo

    • 1 hr 2 min
    André Ramos-Woodard

    André Ramos-Woodard

    André Ramos-Woodard is a photographic artist originally from Texas and Tennessee. In their series BLACK SNAFU, André combines photographs celebrating Blackness with appropriated illustrations from racist cartoons as a way of confronting the history and present reality of American racism. In our conversation we discussed appropriation, questions of audience and community, and mental health. Then in the second segment, we talked about what inspires us outside of the visual arts.
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    Show Notes: André Ramos-Woodard André Ramos-Woodard - BLACK SNAFU Hannah Jane Parkinson - “Instagram, an artist and the $100,000 selfies—appropriation in the digital age” (Article about Richard Prince Instagram images) William Camargo William Camargo’s IG post riffing on John Diva’s work Kansas City Artists Coalition - André Ramos-Woodard Artist Talk André Ramos-Woodard - African America Roger Ebert - “Video games can never be art” Beyonce - Renaissance Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo

    • 1 hr 19 min
    Amanda Marchand

    Amanda Marchand

    Amanda Marchand is a Canadian, New York-based photographer. Amanda’s Lumen Notebook series is a body of elegant and strikingly beautiful images that nevertheless layer deep meaning within their seemingly simple compositions. In our conversation, Amanda and I talked about her process in creating these photograms and how working within strict constraints allows her to explore the technique more fully. We also discussed how she uses photography to facilitate connection and presence, and the duality of delight and mortality in her work. Then for the second segment we had a meandering conversation about autism, communication, attention, and using art to process and understand our emotional experiences.
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    Show Notes: Amanda Marchand Amanda Marchand - The World is Astonishing With You in It Medium Photo - Second Sight lecture with Amanda Marchand Barbara Bosworth - The Meadow Stanley Fish - Is There a Text in This Class? Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal - Louise Bourgeois Linda Connor Kathy Acker Amanda Marchand - Nothing Will Ever Be the Same Again Amanda Marchand - Lumen Circles Keep the Channel Open - Episode 124: Farrah Karapetian Leah Sobsey Mary Oliver - Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver Mary Oliver - “The Summer Day” Tara Brach Jenny Odell - How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Fatemeh Baigmoradi

    Fatemeh Baigmoradi

    Fatemeh Baigmoradi is a photographic artist originally from Iran. In her series It’s Hard to Kill, Fatemeh works with archival family photos from Iran, using fire to obscure or destroy portions of the image—connecting to the way that her own family and many others burned their photos after the Iranian Revolution to protect themselves or others in the photos. In our conversation we talked about the relationship between photography and memory, censorship, and how violence, healing, and cleansing are all intertwined in Fatemeh’s work. Then in the second segment, Fatemeh and I talked about immigration.
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    Show Notes: Fatemeh Baigmoradi Fatemeh Baigmoradi - It’s Hard to Kill Fatemeh Baigmoradi - Subjectivity and Objectivity Medium Festival of Photography - Fatemeh Baigmoradi lecture Keep the Channel Open - Episode 22: Esmé Weijun Wang Keep the Channel Open - Episode 46: Rizzhel Javier Brandon Shimoda Patrick Nagatani Ignant - “Fatemeh Baigmoradi On Censorship and the Fires of Revolution” Mitra Tabrizian Marcel Proust - Swann’s Way: In Search of Lost Time, Volume 1 Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo

    • 53 min
    Sarah Hollowell

    Sarah Hollowell

    Sarah Hollowell is a writer based in Indiana. Sarah’s debut novel, A Dark and Starless Forest, is a YA contemporary fantasy story centered on a family of foster sisters learning about their magic, until suddenly they start disappearing. In our conversation we talked about the difference in process between short stories and novels, how her novel portrays abuse dynamics, and the importance of fan fiction. Then in the second segment, Sarah and I talked about the Alpha Workshop.
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    Show Notes: Sarah Hollowell Follow @sarahhollowell on Twitter Purchase A Dark and Starless Forest: Viewpoint Books (Columbus, IN) | Mysterious Galaxy (San Diego, CA) | Bookshop.org Alpha Young Writers Workshop Ashley Schumacher - The Renaissance of Gwen Hathaway Rude Tales of Magic Transcript Episode Credits Editing/Mixing: Mike Sakasegawa Music: Podington Bear Transcription: Shea Aguinaldo

    • 1 hr 21 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
36 Ratings

36 Ratings

MaggieTown ,

Thoughtful Interviews with a Thoughtful Guy

It’s rare that people really prepare for interviews, and it’s rare that people are both incredibly smart and incredibly generous, and so it’s only right to say that this is a rare show on several counts.

BetsyMarro ,

I love the deep dive into art and things I care about here

I've been reading Mike's tinyletter for a whiel now and then learned about his podcast. Mike's interview with Celeste Ng got me hooked. He knows the art of thoughtful conversation and better yet, knows how to listen so that we get insights not just on craft but on life from artists we admire or just discovered. This is great. I don't listen to many podcasts but I'm adding this one.

smandelburg ,

Insightful Podcast with a Personable Host

As the host of a podcast myself, I always gravitate toward other literary and arts shows where the host likes to grapple with questions of craft, and where you can feel the host has a facility at establishing rapport with their guests. Look no further than Keep the Channel Open.

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