319 episodes

Join Kerre McIvor one of New Zealand’s best loved personalities as she dishes up a bold, sharp and energetic show Monday to Friday 9am-12md on Newstalk ZB. News, opinion, analysis, lifestyle and entertainment – we’ve got your morning listening covered.

Kerre McIvor Mornings Podcast Newstalk ZB

    • News

Join Kerre McIvor one of New Zealand’s best loved personalities as she dishes up a bold, sharp and energetic show Monday to Friday 9am-12md on Newstalk ZB. News, opinion, analysis, lifestyle and entertainment – we’ve got your morning listening covered.

    Kerre McIvor: Judith Collins is gone - once National can find an alternative

    Kerre McIvor: Judith Collins is gone - once National can find an alternative

    She might not believe the numbers.  She might claim that no-one in her party is out to roll her.  But National party leader Judith Collins would not have enjoyed hearing the results of the latest Newshub-Reid Research Poll that shows her falling even further in popularity. 
    The latest poll shows Jacinda Arden streets ahead in the preferred PM stakes at 48.1 per cent, although she is down 4.5 percentage points, Judith Collins was at 5.6 percent, down 12 percentage points. 
    Judith Collins says at this point in the election cycle she simply doesn't care.
    But seriously how long can she expect to remain leader with those sorts of figures? 
    Simon Bridges was rolled in part for leading National to a shocking low of 30 percent in 2020.  Judith Collins had an unenviable task leading a hapless hopeless party into the 2020 election but since that time she's failed to fire. 
    She was a strong and powerful figure in Opposition but as leader she has been somewhat muted.  ACT is doing a better job leading the opposition although Chris Bishop and Nicola Willis are making inroads in their respective portfolios. 
    The answer is if not her, who?  Until the National caucus knows the answer to that, Judith Collins is safe.  But once a viable alternative presents themselves, she'll be gone.

    • 2 min
    Kerre McIvor: Are there still Good Samaritans amongst us?

    Kerre McIvor: Are there still Good Samaritans amongst us?

    You'd like to think you'd be the first to rush in if someone was being threatened, but there is a very real risk in these mad and crazy times that you could literally be putting your life on the line to help. 
    In the wake of the Dunedin Countdown stabbings, there are stories of tremendous courage on the part of the store manager and bystanders who are now in hospital recovering from their injuries. 
    Others said they just froze, they saw what was happening, they knew people were in trouble but they did nothing. 
    People who failed to step in are being told they shouldn't feel guilty, remember Austin Hemmings? 
    He was the father of three, the devoted husband and the incredible colleague who was coming out of his workplace when he saw a man assaulting a woman and stepped in to help her escape. 
    He was stabbed and fatally injured; he paid the ultimate price for being a Good Samaritan. 
    If you've ever been in that situation I'd love to know how you handled it. 
    Does it help if you have been trained for a conflict situation?
    Say, if you've been in the army or you were a police officer or a corrections officer? 
    Does it help if you know first aid?
    One of the reasons I did a first aid course a couple of years ago because I felt it was almost inevitable I'll come across an accident? 
    In these mad and crazy times, we ask the question ‘will people step in?’
    The answer is yes, and we saw that in Dunedin yesterday.
    If you've ever been in that situation I'd love to hear your story.

    • 4 min
    Chris Lewis and Sid and Chand Sahrawat: Farmers and hospitality disappointed to not be allocated MIQ spaces

    Chris Lewis and Sid and Chand Sahrawat: Farmers and hospitality disappointed to not be allocated MIQ spaces

    The government's making space in managed isolation to get skilled and critical workers into the country.
    Over the next 10 months, 500 spaces per fortnight will be allocated to support New Zealand's economic recovery.
    Three hundred seasonal workers will be able to arrive each month from June, 2400 in total by next March.
    There's also an allocation for construction workers, international students and refugees.COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says they need to balance seasonal and strategic skills shortages, using spaces freed up by the trans-Tasman bubble.
    But dairy farmers and the hospitality sector are disappointed the government is not allocating MIQ spaces to workers who could help.
    Federated Farmers Immigration spokesman Chris Lewis and restaurateurs Chand Sahrawat and her husband Sid, told Kerre McIvor they’re disappointed with the announcement.
    LISTEN ABOVE
     

    • 19 min
    Kerre McIvor: Where will these new refugees end up?

    Kerre McIvor: Where will these new refugees end up?

    Break out the bubbly.
    Well, the bubbly we would have had if our winegrowers had been able to harvest their grapes.
    From next month around 300 of the country's 6200 MIQ rooms will be allocated to RSE workers every month, meaning 2400 RSE workers are estimated to arrive by March next year. 
    There will also be 400 international students allowed in June for the start of semester two, 240 specialised construction workers will arrive between June and October. 
    The government has also renewed border exceptions for shearers, rural mobile plant machinery operators and essential travellers to and from the Pacific. 
    Oh, and as of July, we'll be getting 100 refugees every six weeks. 
    Sorry?  Yes, that's right, 100 refugees every six weeks. 
    I totally get that we are in a very fortunate position as a country and that we have international obligations; it is utterly incumbent upon us to share our good fortune. 
    But, given that we have 22,521 applicants on the Housing Register as at 31 December 2020, an increase of 51.5 percent compared with the same time last year (i.e. December 2019), given that we're spending more than a million dollars a day on emergency housing grants for 8500 people, many of whom have complex high needs, where are we going to put those refugees?
    Chris Hipkins’ office didn't know so they referred us to Kris Faafoi's office, who didn't know and they referred us to an immigration manager who is going to get back to us. 
    In an ideal world, religious groups would be sponsoring these refugees and they would be helping provide rentals and jobs and support and all would be well. 
    However, I have a sneaking suspicion that these poor buggers are going to be out of the frying pan that is a UN refugee camp and into the fire that is an emergency housing motel in Rotorua or Hamilton. 
    Hard to be grateful for that.  

    • 4 min
    Chris Cahill: Police Association backs ban on gangs owning firearms

    Chris Cahill: Police Association backs ban on gangs owning firearms

    The Government is hitting gangs where it hurts their pockets.
    It's amending the Criminal Proceeds Act to allow seizure of assets of people associated with organised crime – for items they couldn't afford with their legal income.
    Police Association President Chris Cahill told Kerre McIvor this is a positive move for Police - and they could do it with more of their possessions. 
    "If you can take those bikes and say 'you explain to us how you paid for that legally'. If you can, you can have it back, and if you can't, it's getting forfeited, and that can have a real impact."
    However, Mongrel Mob Kingdom's adviser Louise Hutchinson says it will affect how gang members get kai for families.
    "Hunting is a primary means for them to gather kai for their whanau, especially in our rural areas." 
    Asides from that, she says she doesn't see this making a difference on the ground.
    "There's still huge problems with poverty, the housing crisis. These things aren't being addressed, which is driving the likes of crime in our nation."
    LISTEN ABOVE

    • 8 min
    Kerre McIvor: All parties should be involved in large scale DoC changes

    Kerre McIvor: All parties should be involved in large scale DoC changes

    Well there's a funny old thing. 
    Last week, I received a text from someone saying that we needed to be aware that Māori were being appointed to conservation councils replacing elected councillors and that this was being done without any consultation. 
    I'm pretty sure I read it out - it was a big week and maybe I thought I just did - but we did pass it on to our news room. 
    And then what do you know, on Sunday the National Party releases a document that shows the body tasked with reviewing conservation policies has been recommended that the Conservation Act be reviewed and replaced with a system that better honours the Treaty of Waitangi.   
    It also suggests that the government reforms all conservation entities including Doc and that the Crown revoke its ownership of indigenous species.  And to provide for the delegation, transfer and devolution of functions and powers within the conservation system to tangata whenua.
    I get that Māori can make a strong claim that they are better kaitiaki of the environment than the government or local councils when you look at the state of the nation's oceans and rivers. 
    But surely any kind of bold transformation of the Conservation Act should involve all parties concerned.  If 85 per cent of the West Coast is affected, then should Coasters be involved in the decision making? 
    Inter-generational recreational fishers and hunters, professional hunters - shouldn't they too have a right to have their voices heard? 
    I like going for the odd tramp or bush walk and as a family we want to do more of that.  There's no suggestion we won't be able to access DOC parks in the future, no suggestion that parts of New Zealand will be closed off to some New Zealanders and not others. 
    We saw that with the transfer of ownership of mountains to iwi - for example, the 14 tupuna maunga of Auckland that were part of the settlement of 2014 -  technically they are in the custody of their traditional iwi but they are held in trust for the common benefit of the iwi/hapū of Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau and the other people of Auckland.
    So undoubtedly there will be much comment, much debate - especially as government review committees seem to be recommending Maori have a seat at the table in many areas of government.  We had health last week, conservation this week.   

    • 5 min

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