25 episodes

The Knowhow podcast is aimed at bringing academics and professionals together to dissect the pressing matters of today

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The Knowhow podcast is aimed at bringing academics and professionals together to dissect the pressing matters of today

    Episode 25: The Queen and Us: Fact and fiction in reporting the Royals

    Episode 25: The Queen and Us: Fact and fiction in reporting the Royals

    A new podcast series On Royal Watch delves into the complicated relationship between the British royal family and the media. In today's episode we talk to Anna Whitelock, professor of the History of Monarchy at City, University of London, and look at the past, present and future relationship that the media have with the royal family, and in particular how the Queen is portrayed. How has that changed – and will the way the Firm as it’s known be covered in the same way when Prince Charles or Prince William is on the throne? And what effect are fictional portrayals of the Windsors having on their image?

    • 40 min
    Episode 24: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle: Is it the media’s fault they left royal life?

    Episode 24: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle: Is it the media’s fault they left royal life?

    A new podcast series On Royal Watch delves into the complicated relationship between the British royal family and the media. In today's episode, we focus on Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s frenzied relationship with the press. Their romance, wedding, pregnancies, public exodus to the US via Canada, family dramas, and now a hopeful rebranding as media moguls continue to make headlines in the UK and around the world. We talk to Royal Editor at Large for Harper’s Bazaar Omid Scobie.

    • 45 min
    Episode 23: Covering a royal scandal: How should the media report allegations against Prince Andrew?

    Episode 23: Covering a royal scandal: How should the media report allegations against Prince Andrew?

    A new podcast series On Royal Watch delves into the complicated relationship between the British royal family and the media. In today's episode, we focus on the ongoing allegations of sexual assault against the Duke of York. Listen to experts Dr. Leigh Gilmore and Jen Tarran talk about what media have done right, what they've missed, and if Prince Andrew's royal status shields him from further scrutiny.

    A trigger warning: In this episode we are discussing sexual abuse and detailing the allegations against Prince Andrew.

    • 51 min
    Episode 22 - Meghan, Harry and Oprah: What we learned about the royals and the media

    Episode 22 - Meghan, Harry and Oprah: What we learned about the royals and the media

    The Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s bombshell interview with Oprah Winfrey this week laid bare bitter rifts at the heart of the House of Windsor. The revelations of Meghan’s suicidal thoughts during her pregnancy, the allegations that another member of the family made racist remarks about her unborn child, and that the Prince of Wales had refused to take his son’s calls made headlines around the world. The Palace took two whole days to respond before issuing a statement that said the issues of race were ‘concerning’ but would be dealt with privately.

    But there was another powerful institution other than the Palace that Meghan and Harry directed their anger at: the British media. Harry told Oprah that the racism from the tabloid press was a large part of why the couple had left the UK, and talked about how the royals were trapped and in fear of media coverage. Perhaps proving the Sussexs’ point about hostile coverage, the GMB host Piers Morgan, one of Meghan’s fiercest critics, said he did not believe a word she said. After 41,000 complaints were made about him to the broadcasting regulator Ofcom, he and ITV parted company.

    In today's episode we interrogate the symbiotic and often fractious relationship between the royals and the media. How should royals be reported on – were the Sussexs naïve or justified in their criticisms? What role did race play in the coverage of Meghan? Were she and her sister-in-law portrayed as two different archetypes? And why was Oprah Winfrey so successful in getting the scoops from the couple?

    • 45 min
    Reporting Injustice Episode 5: How journalists cover missing and murdered indigenous women and girls

    Reporting Injustice Episode 5: How journalists cover missing and murdered indigenous women and girls

    In today's episode, we talk to activists about missing and murdered indigenous women, girls and two spirit people and the reporters who are trying to shed light on this largely overlooked crisis.

    After years of failed law enforcement investigations and inconclusive data on indigenous women and girls, it was an unprecedented measure to label the systemic violence as a genocide in a country that has a reputation for being peaceful. The report states that up to 4,000 indigenous women and girls have been murdered in Canada in the last 50 years, but adds the caveat that the exact number may never be known.

    Years of strained government and community relations, and mistreatment of Inuit, metis, aboriginal and indigenous Canadians on various fronts such as forced education, the foster care system, lack of essential resources, and now neglecting a genocide… equals frustration and tension.

    Yet, the US has just passed two bills that are meant to address violence against indigenous women and girls. So with federal governments in the US and Canada finally taking some initiative to address the genocide of indigenous women, what role do journalists play in reporting on this? This episode examines how coverage has been both positive and negative and what news organizations need to do in order to improve current depictions of indigenous people.

    This is the last episode of The Knowhow Podcast's special five-part series: Reporting Injustice... A series where we look at some of the key stories in recent years that were turning points in how we saw some fundamental issues. We talk to the journalists who uncovered them about their struggle to bring these stories to public view. And we speak to experts who explain how these reports altered the way society perceived pressing matters of race, class and sexism. From Bill Cosby to Windrush, Grenfell to missing and murdered indigenous women, Reporting Injustice looks at the story behind the stories...

    • 23 min
    Reporting Injustice Episode 4: Investigating the hidden story of domestic abuse by police officers

    Reporting Injustice Episode 4: Investigating the hidden story of domestic abuse by police officers

    In this episode, we look at how domestic abuse by police officers often went unpunished… until Alexandra Heal from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism helped set in train a nationwide super-complaint to call for sweeping changes in the system.

    As journalists we all want to make a difference, to pursue a story that changes lives. Few do that in a significant way - let alone with their first story out of journalism school. But that is what happened with Alexandra Heal, a journalism student at City, University of London who started looking at the issue of domestic abuse perpetrated by police officers while still studying for her MA.

    The story began with Alexandra being intrigued by the anecdote told to her about her friend. She thought there might be something more to it than just a one-off and thought it might work for her MA project. The woman in question wouldn’t talk to her, but undeterred Alexandra decided to investigate further. The stories that she discovered through her interviews showed that there was a clear problem about how police forces dealt with abuse when it was carried out by one of their own.

    This is the fourth episode of The Knowhow Podcast's special five-part series: Reporting Injustice... A series where we look at some of the key stories in recent years that were turning points in how we saw some fundamental issues. We talk to the journalists who uncovered them about their struggle to bring these stories to public view. And we speak to experts who explain how these reports altered the way society perceived pressing matters of race, class and sexism. From Bill Cosby to Windrush, Grenfell to missing and murdered indigenous women, Reporting Injustice looks at the story behind the stories...

    • 17 min

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