53 episodes

Through conversation with experts in technology, law and military affairs, this series explores how new military technology and international law interact. Produced by Dr Lauren Sanders at The University of Queensland School of Law and edited by Rosie Cavdarski.

Law and the Future of War UQ Law and the Future of War

    • Technology
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Through conversation with experts in technology, law and military affairs, this series explores how new military technology and international law interact. Produced by Dr Lauren Sanders at The University of Queensland School of Law and edited by Rosie Cavdarski.

    Operational, Political and Legal Implications of AUKUS - David Nicholls, Matt McDonald and Monique Cormier

    Operational, Political and Legal Implications of AUKUS - David Nicholls, Matt McDonald and Monique Cormier

    In this live recording of an event,  Rain Liivoja talks with David Nicholls, Matt McDonald and Monique Cormier about the new AUKUS arrangement, under which Australia would acquire 8 nuclear-powered submarines with US and UK technology. They discuss the extent to which it represents a major shift in Australia's defence policy, and what we can make of some of the claims made about it.

    David Nicholls is the Executive Director of the Submarine Institute of Australia. A former submarine commander in the Royal Australian Navy, he now works as a defence industry consultant.

    Dr Matt McDonald is an Associate Professor in The University of Queensland's School of Political Science and International Studies. His research focuses on critical theoretical approaches to security and their application to issues such as Australian foreign and security policy, and Asia-Pacific security dynamics.

    Dr Monique Cormier is a Senior Lecturer in the University of New England's School of Law. Her research covers international criminal law, and legal issues relating to nuclear disarmament and extended nuclear deterrence.

    • 54 min
    What space law can tell us about international law - Cris van Eijk

    What space law can tell us about international law - Cris van Eijk

    In this episode, Dr Simon McKenzie chats with Cris van Eijk about space law – including some of its fundamental documents and places of political contestation - and what the structure and focus of space law tells us about international law more generally.  After a few decades on the outer, space law is back in vogue: the rise of commercial space ventures combined with an uptick in geopolitical tension about the use of space makes it particularly important for us to think about if and how it is regulated by law.
    Cris van Eijk is an international lawyer and is currently researching outer space law from environmental, historical, and decolonial perspectives. He is currently part of the Working Group on International Law of the International Astronomical Union's Dark and Quiet Skies Conference, as well as Legal Advisor at Jus Ad Astra, where he analyses environmental rights in orbit. He holds a BA in International Justice and an LLM in Public International Law from Leiden University and is in the final stages of a graduate-entry law degree at the University of Cambridge. 

    Further reading:
    Cris van Eijk, ‘Unstealing the Sky: Third World Equity in the Orbital Commons’ ‘Sorry, Elon: Mars Is Not a Legal Vacuum – and It’s Not Yours, Either’ ‘International Lawyers, Look to the Heavens – Before We Lose Them’ Cris van Eijk and Timiebi Aganaba-Jeanty, ‘Inspired by Africa: A New Approach to Global Space Governance’ Cassandra Steer and Matthew Hersch (eds), War and Peace in Outer Space: Law, Policy, and Ethics Joshua Fitzmaurice and Stacey Henderson, ‘On the Legality of Mars Colonisation’ Surabhi Ranganathan, ‘Ocean Floor Grab: International Law and the Making of an Extractive Imaginary’ Surabhi Ranganathan, ‘The Common Heritage of Mankind: Annotations on a Battle’, Cair Storr, 'Space Is the Only Way to Go: On the Evolution of the Extractivist Imaginary of International Law’, Elena Cirkovic, ‘The Next Generation of International Law: Space, Ice, and the Cosmolegal Proposal’ Natalie Treviño, ‘The Cosmos Is Not Finished’ (PhD, Western University 2020)Timiebi Aganaba-Jeanty, ‘Space Sustainability and the Freedom of Outer Space’ Fabio Tronchetti, ‘Legal Aspects of the Military Uses of Outer Space’, Handbook of Space Law Tanja Masson-Zwaan and Mahulena Hofmann, Introduction to Space Law 

    • 38 min
    What art can tell us about new digital technologies - Anna Briers

    What art can tell us about new digital technologies - Anna Briers

    In this episode, Dr Simon McKenzie talks with Anna Briers about what visual art can tell us about new digital technologies. The current show at UQ Art Museum – called ‘Don't Be Evil’ – seeks to show us some of the invisible power structures of networked technology, including the implications of machine learning, artificial intelligence, and data capitalism.
    Anna Briers is the Curator at the UQ Art Museum. She has curated in both an institutional and freelance capacity for over a decade in various contexts ranging from art museums and arts festivals, through to underground tunnels and golden canola fields. She holds a Masters of Art Curatorship from the University of Melbourne, a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Elam) from the University of Auckland.

    Further reading:
    UQ Art Museum, Conflict in My Outlook_We Met Online Safiya Noble, Algorithms of oppression: how search engines reinforce racism (2018: New York University Press)Timnit Gebru, 'Race and Gender' in Markus D. Dubber, Frank Pasquale, and Sunit Das (ed) in The Oxford Handbook of Ethics of AI (2020: Oxford University Press)Kate Crawford and Vladan Joler, The Anatomy of an AI System (2018)Simon Denny, Extractor (2019)Sean Dockray, Learning from YouTube (2018)Forensic Architecture, Model Zoo (2020)

     

    • 33 min
    Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War - Samuel Moyn

    Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War - Samuel Moyn

    In this episode, Dr Simon McKenzie talks with Professor Samuel Moyn about his new book, Humane, which considers some of the consequences of focussing on the laws of fighting wars at the expense of considering when they should be fought. They discuss the 19th-century peace movement, and what some of the legal debates from this time reveal about contemporary conflict and the rise of targeted killing and drone warfare.
    Samuel Moyn is Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and a Professor of History at Yale University. He has written several books in his fields of European intellectual history and human rights history, including The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History (2010), and edited or coedited a number of others. His most recent books are Christian Human Rights (2015), based on Mellon Distinguished Lectures at the University of Pennsylvania in fall 2014, and Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World (2018). His newest book is Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2021). Over the years he has written in venues such as Boston Review, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Dissent, The Nation, The New Republic, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. 

    • 56 min
    Mitigating harm to civilian populations and critical infrastructure in urban warfare - Abby Zeith and Michael Talhami

    Mitigating harm to civilian populations and critical infrastructure in urban warfare - Abby Zeith and Michael Talhami

    In today’s episode, Dr Lauren Sanders talks with Abby Zeith and Michael Talhami of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) about urban warfare. Focussing on the impacts of conflict upon urban populations, they look at some of the issues that have arisen in terms of IHL compliance in and around urban centres as a result of technology. They also speak about the current initiatives being undertaken to mitigate harm to civilians as a result of urban conflict.  
    Abby Zeith is a Legal Adviser in the ICRC’s Arms and Conduct of Hostilities Unit in Geneva. Her work focuses on urban warfare and the application of the rules governing the conduct of hostilities under international humanitarian law more generally.
    Michael Talhami is an Urban Services Advisor in the Water and Habitat at the ICRC. He focuses on urban policy formation that helps guide humanitarian programming in support of helping service providers to ensure operational continuity in service provision (water, wastewater, and energy). Michael was previously the ICRC's Regional Water and Habitat Advisor to the Near and Middle East, and has held consultancies with GIZ and the UNDP in the Middle East, and several international advisory firms, following a career as an environmental engineer.
     Further reading:
    ICRC Handbook, Reducing Civilian Harm in Urban Warfare: A Commander’s Handbook, 2021ICRC Report, Urban Services During Protracted Armed Conflict, 2015World Bank, ICRC and UNICEF Report, Joining Forces to Combat Protracted Crises, 2021ICRC Report, I saw my city die: Voices from the front lines of urban conflict in Iraq, Syria and Yemen, 2017ICRC Humanitarian Law and Policy Blog, Urban Warfare Special Series, 2020ICRC Report, IHL and the Challenges of Contemporary Armed Conflicts, 2019 To be released: ICRC Report on Explosive Weapons in Populated Areas: A Deadly Choice Professor Anthony King, Urban Warfare in the Twenty-First Century, 2021, Wiley & SonsICRC Law and Policy Blog, Engaging with the industry: integrating IHL into new technologies in urban warfare, 2021

    Note: For more information on the Safe Schools Declaration and the Guidelines for Protecting Schools and Universities from Military Use during Armed Conflict visit here. As at time of podcast publication, 112 States have endorsed the Safe Schools Declaration (vice 111 at time of recording).

    • 48 min
    Australia in space - Tristan Moss

    Australia in space - Tristan Moss

    In this episode, Dr Simon McKenzie talks with Dr Tristan Moss about history of Australia in Space. They discuss the history of Australia in space, starting with its beginnings in a rocket range in Woomera in the 1960s to the recent founding of the Australian Space Agency. They discuss the patchy approach that Australia has taken to space exploitation, and put it into a broader perspective. 
    Dr Tristan Moss is a senior lecturer in the Griffith Asia Institute. He is a historian researching Australian space history and the history of the ADF with a focus on its culture and policy. His current research focuses on a history of Australian space activities, 1957 – 2020, and he is also working on a history of sex in the Australian military.  He is the author of Guarding the Periphery: The Australian Army in Papua New Guinea, 1951–75 (Cambridge University Press, 2017), and co-editor of Beyond Combat: Australian military activity away from the battlefields (NewSouth Books, 2018). Tristan has worked on the Official History of Australian operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and East Timor at the Australian War Memorial and on the Official History of peacekeeping. 

    Further reading
    Brett Biddington, 'Is Australia Really Lost in Space?', (2021) 57 Space Policy The work of Asif A. SiddiqiDesmond Ball, Bill Robinson, Richard Tanter and others, The Pine Gap ProjectKerrie Dougherty, Australia in Space (2017: ATF Press)Peter Morton, Fire Across the Desert (2017: Department of Defence)

    • 29 min

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