300 episodes

Leading Saints is a nonprofit organization with a mission to help Latter-day Saints (LDS, Mormon) be better prepared to lead.



Here are 4 ways Leading Saints accomplishes the above mission statement:



1. Connect Latter-day Saint Leaders



2. Enhance Leadership Ability



3. Present Leadership Scholarship & Research



4. Celebrate Divine Guidance



Podcast Host:



Kurt Francom is the founder and executive director of Leading Saints, a nonprofit organization helping Latter-day Saints be better prepared to lead. He manages the day-to-day efforts of Leading Saints and is the host of the podcast by the same name. Leading Saints has reached individuals internationally and has received over 2 million downloads. Kurt currently lives in Utah with his lovely wife Alanna. They are blessed to have three children. He enjoys drawing caricatures, playing basketball, reading, and watching college football. Kurt has served as a full-time missionary (California Sacramento), as a bishop, 1st counselor in a stake presidency, and elders quorum president.

Leading Saints Podcast Leading Saints

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.8 • 953 Ratings

Leading Saints is a nonprofit organization with a mission to help Latter-day Saints (LDS, Mormon) be better prepared to lead.



Here are 4 ways Leading Saints accomplishes the above mission statement:



1. Connect Latter-day Saint Leaders



2. Enhance Leadership Ability



3. Present Leadership Scholarship & Research



4. Celebrate Divine Guidance



Podcast Host:



Kurt Francom is the founder and executive director of Leading Saints, a nonprofit organization helping Latter-day Saints be better prepared to lead. He manages the day-to-day efforts of Leading Saints and is the host of the podcast by the same name. Leading Saints has reached individuals internationally and has received over 2 million downloads. Kurt currently lives in Utah with his lovely wife Alanna. They are blessed to have three children. He enjoys drawing caricatures, playing basketball, reading, and watching college football. Kurt has served as a full-time missionary (California Sacramento), as a bishop, 1st counselor in a stake presidency, and elders quorum president.

    Part 2: What Sexual Addiction Recovery Actually Looks Like | An Interview with Steven Croshaw and Chris Raleigh

    Part 2: What Sexual Addiction Recovery Actually Looks Like | An Interview with Steven Croshaw and Chris Raleigh

    This is PART 2 of a 2-part podcast conversation. Listen to PART 1



    Steven Croshaw is the co-founder and President of SA Lifeline Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing hope, education and resources related to sexual addiction and betrayal trauma recovery. He was instrumental in the production of Understanding Pornography and Sexual Addiction: A Resource for Families, Religious, and Community Leaders. Steven is a commercial real estate developer. He has been married to Rhyll Anne Croshaw for 49 years and they are the parents of seven children and 27 grandchildren. They are grateful to be working recovery one day at a time.



    Chris Raleigh grew up in Cottonwood Heights, Utah, and served in the Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Mission. He has a bachelor’s degree in business, a master’s degree in education, and has taught for 28 years in both public and private school settings—including 23 years as a seminary and institute instructor. Chris' church assignments have included callings in the elders quorum, Sunday School, high council, bishopric, and as a bishop and stake president. In his current assignment he serves with his wife, Peggy, on the Church’s Corrections Committee, ministering to both Church leaders and inmates in six county jails and the Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison, Utah. Chris and Peggy have nine children and 14 grandchildren.



    Chris' desire in sharing his story is to lend hope through the Atonement of Jesus Christ to the many men and women who feel trapped within the grasp of the illness called addiction. Trying to reverse four generations of addiction within his family has not been easy but he knows it is possible.



    Steven Croshaw



    Chris Raleigh

    Highlights

    0:15 Can church leaders do anything to help people be completely honest and change?



    1:45 What happens when you are radically honest?



    2:40 We can’t always understand God’s timing for things or why we have to go through them again and again



    5:00 Leaders have to surrender too. Surrender those they are trying to help to God. You can’t mess with other people’s agency.



    8:00 We can talk about recovery but they won’t know it and understand it till they go through it. Steven explains the steps and what he had to be willing to do to recover.



    10:00 It’s necessary to find a safe place to be radically honest



    12:00 Practicing honesty brings us closer to Christ. Addiction cannot survive the light of Christ. Without honesty you can’t get there.



    15:30 Is disclosure to a bishop the best first step to recovery?



    18:30 Instead of trying to decide if it’s an addiction or not, just treat it as such



    * Create boundaries and bottom lines

    * Be honest about all behavior

    * Receive the help you need



    21:00 Many people have an aversion to the word addiction. Call it what you want but it's a biochemical brain condition. It has a chemical hook.



    23:30 Watching pornography first brings euphoria but is followed by feelings of shame and anger towards yourself



    24:00 Whether you are a periodic user or a daily user it creates a feeling of unworthiness before God, unworthiness of the love from others, and self hatred



    24:45 Sexual addiction deosn’t just want more it wants different. Pornography gets deeper and darker. There is a change in brain chemistry.



    28:00 A lot of times bishops give advice based on their own experience however they need to keep in mind all the past history and possible family issues of the person they are trying to help



    29:00 Pornography is not my problem.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Part 1: What Sexual Addiction Recovery Actually Looks Like | An Interview with Steven Croshaw and Chris Raleigh

    Part 1: What Sexual Addiction Recovery Actually Looks Like | An Interview with Steven Croshaw and Chris Raleigh

    Steven Croshaw is the co-founder and President of SA Lifeline Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing hope, education and resources related to sexual addiction and betrayal trauma recovery. He was instrumental in the production of Understanding Pornography and Sexual Addiction: A Resource for Families, Religious, and Community Leaders. Steven is a commercial real estate developer. He has been married to Rhyll Anne Croshaw for 49 years and they are the parents of seven children and 27 grandchildren. They are grateful to be working recovery one day at a time.



    Chris Raleigh grew up in Cottonwood Heights, Utah, and served in the Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Mission. He has a bachelor’s degree in business, a master’s degree in education, and has taught for 28 years in both public and private school settings—including 23 years as a seminary and institute instructor. Chris' church assignments have included callings in the elders quorum, Sunday School, high council, bishopric, and as a bishop and stake president. In his current assignment, he serves with his wife, Peggy, on the Church’s Corrections Committee, ministering to both Church leaders and inmates in six county jails and the Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison, Utah. Chris and Peggy have nine children and 14 grandchildren.



    Chris' desire in sharing his story is to lend hope through the Atonement of Jesus Christ to the many men and women who feel trapped within the grasp of the illness called addiction. Trying to reverse four generations of addiction within his family has not been easy but he knows it is possible. This is PART 1 of a 2-part podcast conversation.



    Steven Croshaw



    Chris Raleigh

    Highlights

    02:15 Introduction to the episode and the topic of sexual addiction and the speakers, Steven and Chris



    05:30 Chris talks more about his story of dealing with pornography and how it has inspired others as he has been willing to be honest and tell his story



    10:30 Steven tells his story of how he got into pornography and how he and Chris met in recovery.



    19:00 Betrayal trauma is equally important to address as pornography addiction. Wives need to be brought into the recovery process. They need support and resources to get through the process too.



    25:00 You can’t just stop the behavior. You can’t do it by yourself.



    27:00 While Steven’s leaders cared and were loving, they didn’t give him the right advice and resources that he needed



    27:30 Steven’s first experience with a sexaholics 12-step meeting. He walked away from it because he couldn’t relate.



    28:40 Steven’s life-changing experience of getting arrested for picking up a prostitute. It was a turning point for him.



    32:00 Through all of his recovery, Steven now understands that recovery is based on total and complete honesty.



    33:00 Steven describes his third disciplinary council as a positive experience even though he got excommunicated



    34:50 Anyone struggling with sexual addiction needs to know that you are responsible for your own recovery. Bishops and stake presidents don’t know how to help you.



    35:45 The steps Steven took to find the proper help



    37:15 How can I trust my husband after so much betrayal? How do I know my husband is truly in recovery?



    39:30 Steven and his wife have created a foundation to help others recover from sexual addiction and betrayal trauma



    40:00 What does recovery take and what does it look like?



    * Radical honesty

    * Willingness



    Links

    Listen to PART 2

    • 36 min
    Part 1: The Research Behind Becoming Christlike | An Interview with Ryan Gottfredson

    Part 1: The Research Behind Becoming Christlike | An Interview with Ryan Gottfredson

    This is a rebroadcast. The episode originally ran in September 2021.



    Ryan Gottfredson, Ph.D., is a cutting-edge leadership development author, researcher, and consultant. He helps organizations vertically develop their leaders primarily through a focus on mindsets. He is also an associate leadership professor at the College of Business and Economics at California State University-Fullerton. He holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior and Human Resources from Indiana University, and a B.A. from Brigham Young University. As a consultant, he works with organizations to develop their leaders and improve their culture.



    Ryan is the author of The Elevated Leader and Success Mindsets. He has written multiple articles for Leading Saints, presented at a live event about mindsets, and is a repeat podcast guest. As Ryan reviewed leadership research, he found it primarily answered one question: “What do leaders need to do to be effective?” The focus of his work has been on “What do leaders need to be to be effective?” In this podcast, Ryan and Kurt discuss the concept of vertical development and how it applies to individuals and leadership.





    Highlights

    06:25 Vertical development is the next topic Ryan has been studying and writing about. It applies to us emotionally and spiritually, and possibly even physically.

    07:40 Overview of mindsets: Mindsets are the mental lenses we wear that shape how we view the world

    09:10 What vertical development is



    * Three adult developmental stages that are a function of effort, both horizontally and vertically

    * Elevating our ability to make meaning of our world in more cognitively and emotionally sophisticated ways

    * 12:00 Examples of how people in different levels respond to constructive criticism



    13:45 The three different levels



    * Mind 1.0: Focused on our comfort, safety, and belonging. Self-protective. Dependent thinkers, exchanging power and independence for these needs.

    * Mind 2.0: Focused on being seen, advanced, and getting ahead. Independent thinkers, in self-reward mode.

    * Mind 3.0: Focused on contributing and adding value, externally focused on lifting and elevating others. Interdependent thinkers, able to see from different perspectives and sit with complexity. Only 1% of adults get to this place.



    20:00 Becoming more like the Savior happens through vertical development



    * Example of Mind 1.0 recommendation for seeking information

    * Approaching teaching from the perspective of vertical vs. horizontal development



    25:15 The tension between safety and truth



    * Example of people protecting the safety of beliefs in a Sunday School lesson

    * Being a seeker of truth and learning to sit with complexity instead of becoming defensive

    * It is in the interpreting that we connect with God



    31:05 Leaders operate differently depending on their vertical development



    * Do we even allow for a conversation about interpretation?

    * “Aspiring” fits into Mind 2.0

    * Mind 3.0 leaders are focused on creating a culture that is inclusive and allows for growth and development



    37:25 The culture of aspiring to leadership

    39:00 How do we go about developing vertically?



    * What makes meaning for us are our mindsets

    * Example of an inward vs. outward mindset and how it helps us become more like Jesus Christ

    * Seeing others as doing their best: “What has happened to you?” vs. “What is wrong with you?”



    46:20 Learning acceptance: Healing from our own traumas as we recognize Christ accepting us



    * Vertical development involves calming our response so we have a greater tolerance
    ...

    • 1 hr 1 min
    When the Gospel Seems Unjust to the Rising Generation | An Interview with Tyler Johnson

    When the Gospel Seems Unjust to the Rising Generation | An Interview with Tyler Johnson

    Dr. Tyler Johnson is is a medical oncologist, author, and a clinical assistant professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He also serves as a leader of the Stanford inpatient oncology services, including supervising the oncology housestaff service. Tyler has served as Bishop in the Stanford Ward and taught institute. He co-hosts The Doctor's Art podcast and writes on the intersection of medicine, ethics, and spirituality. Tyler's writings has been featured by Religion News Service, the Salt Lake Tribune, BYU Studies, Dialogue, and The San Jose Mercury News, where he is a regular contributor.

    Highlights

    02:00 Introduction to the episode and Tyler Johnson



    03:30 Tyler’s background as an oncologist and professor



    09:30 Teaching experience in the church and at the institute at Stanford



    14:00 Many youth are leaving the church. We can do a better job at teaching them.



    18:20 Where do we fail to teach the power of the gospel to youth and others?



    20:00 Us vs them dynamic when it comes to people who leave the church and those who stay



    22:30 As a leader, how do we avoid the us vs them dynamic at church and in our classes



    25:45 Tyler breaks down the four parts of America and why it’s important to understanding and helping our youth today



    * Free America

    * Real America

    * Smart America

    * Just (justice) America



    36:30 Most youth today belong to "just America." They value justice and fairness and have lots of concerns. Understanding these values is really important as a leader.



    39:30 How can leaders best help and guide the youth (just America)?



    41:20 When someone comes to you with a deeply felt question, it's better to recognize the virtuous impulse behind the question before dealing with the content of the question



    47:00 Empathy before certainty or ambiguity. Productive discussions are going to come from showing empathy for people’s concerns. Show them you are on their team.



    52:00 The different types of Americans and these mindsets in the church. People that belong to just America don’t feel like they belong in the church.



    59:00 Tyler talks to people that feel they are part of just America



    1:05:30 We all need space and grace. Even the highest leaders of our church.



    1:06:45 We hold back empathy from our leaders because they are the ones in power



    1:08:00 Why the past 10 years of American life have been uniquely stupid. Social media makes it so easy for us to shoot people down who value different things than us.



    1:13:00 A lot of us grew up with the fairytale version of the gospel when in reality church history was really messy. This is what young people are struggling with today. We need to let go of the fairytale and embrace the messiness.



    1:22:00 The defining virtue of the Savior's atonement is his perfect empathy. We are joining the Savior in His work when we show empathy to those that we lead.



    1:23:30 Tyler’s final thoughts and testimony

    Links

    How America Fractured into Four Parts, by George Packer

    Why the Past 10 Years of American Life Have Been Uniquely Stupid, by Jonathan Haidt

    The God Who Weeps

    The Other Prodigal,

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Taking the Guilt Out of Family History Work | A How I Lead Interview with Rick Bennett

    Taking the Guilt Out of Family History Work | A How I Lead Interview with Rick Bennett

    Rick Bennett currently serves as family history leader in his ward and as a temple worker at the Mount Timpanogos Utah Temple for the past ten years. He has served previously as ward mission leader, elders quorum counselor, membership clerk, Gospel Doctrine teacher, Primary teacher, and missionary in South Carolina/Georgia. He has a masters degree in biostatistics from the University of Utah and teaches at Utah Valley University and Western Governors University. For the past seven years, Rick has hosted Gospel Tangents, a podcast and YouTube channel focusing on Mormon history, science, and theology, where he interviews not only Latter-day Saint scholars and leaders, but Restoration leaders from other offshoots like Community of Christ, Strangites, Bickertonites, and even fundamentalist Mormon cousins in the Restoration Movement. Rick loves not only family history but Mormon history as well.

    Highlights

    02:40 Introduction to Rick Bennett



    04:40 Rick talks about his podcast, which focuses on Church history, science, and theology



    21:30 How Rick got into family history



    23:30 Roots Magic, a tool for family history



    27:15 Family history tools and programs



    27:50 If family history doesn’t excite you then that's ok. Do what you can do. Take the time to record your own history and your parents' or grandparents' history.



    30:15 Doing a ward podcast can be another way to record people’s history



    34:30 Do what you want to do in family history. Some people love uploading photos or interviewing family.



    37:15 Rick shares some of his family history and talks about how he has found some of his family records



    42:45 Tips for improving family history in your ward



    * Find the computer guy

    * Connect to your in-laws by helping them with their history

    * Get people excited about finding stories



    43:20 Another way to help with family history is to take pictures of grave stones and put them on findagrave.com



    49:00 Cancel Sunday school and do family history. Get people excited by going to the church history center.



    56:45 Creating groups as families or wards to help give people names for the temple



    1:03:00 Final thoughts and testimony

    Links

    Gospel Tangents Podcast

    Gospel Tangents podcast interviews with Kurt Francom

    Why Your Ward Needs a Podcast

    Read the TRANSCRIPT of this podcast

    Listen on YouTube

    Get 14-day access to the Core Leader Library



    The Leading Saints Podcast has ranked in the top 20 Christianity podcasts in iTunes, gets over 500,000 listens each month, and has over 10 million total downloads as part of nonprofit Leading Saints' mission to help latter-day saints be better prepared to lead. Learn more and listen to any of the past episodes for free at LeadingSaints.org.

    Past guests include Emily Belle Freeman, David Butler,

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Leading with Authority & Equality | An Interview with Brooke Rasmussen

    Leading with Authority & Equality | An Interview with Brooke Rasmussen

    Brooke Rasmussen is completing her masters in Marriage and Family Therapy at Whitworth University in Spokane, Washington and is an intern at Partners with Families and Children, a social safety net for families facing neglect and abuse. Brooke is passionate about helping clients find personal and relational growth in their marriages and teaches Gottman Institute Marriage Courses online with her husband, Scott. Her research at Whitworth focuses on pornography use and its connections to emotional intelligence. Brooke and Scott traveled the world through his career as a diplomat, living in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East before putting down roots in Spokane with their eight children. Brooke's experience as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is fundamental to her development as a leader and thinker.





    Highlights

    02:15 Introduction to Brooke and the topic of personal development



    05:30 Brooke’s process of preparing for the Leading Saints Women’s Conference



    07:45 What is a vertical relationship?



    10:00 In a vertical relationship, there are only winners and losers. You are one up or one down. It can lead to pulling rank, shaming, and others feeling less than.



    14:30 Identifying our own behaviors of trying to one up someone else



    16:30 Kurt gives examples of one-up situations



    18:40 We go one down in a vertical relationship when we are playing a victim role. When we are minimizing our choices and acting like we are forced into things. When we hide our needs or desires.



    20:00 A one-down mindset can be when we let others emotionally protect us or we try to protect them. This happens a lot in families. Brooke gives examples of what this looks like.



    22:00 Playing small can be deflecting or self deprecating. It’s ok to want to aspire.



    24:30 Historically women use the one-down spot for power. There is a victim power.



    26:00 It gets tricky with the one-down position by saying it's a Christlike position



    26:30 Brooke explains what it really means to turn the other cheek



    28:30 Christ invites us to have horizontal relationships, where we are all on equal ground



    29:40 The call of Christianity isn’t a call to be a victim. It’s a call to step into power.



    30:40 If someone tries to one-up you then what does it look like to bring them back down to a horizontal relationship?



    31:30 Brooke shares her own personal experience of a marriage fight and stopping the dynamic of trying to one-up each other



    34:15 What to do in a church meeting when you feel like you got bulldozed. Learn to speak up for yourself and bring a meeting back to horizontal.



    37:20 What can you do or say when someone else is playing the one-down card and acting like they are fine? You know they are trying to be accommodating. You can invite them to equal ground.



    38:15 How anxiety plays into the horizontal and vertical relationship dynamics



    41:00 God has established horizontal relationships and plans since the beginning of time. It’s not meant to be a power struggle, that is why He established councils.



    42:00 If you are receiving as much as you are giving then you aren’t going to get burned out in your calling. It has to be a team effort and a horizontal experience in our wards.



    46:20 We shouldn’t abolish all authority and priesthood keys but it's all about inner intention. As a leader you can take the time to listen to everyone and put yourself on equal ground with others.



    49:30 What to do when you have a tyrannical leader? Some people will refuse to step down.



    51:30 There are real victims and perpetrators. We can still find dignity in our situation and show respect for ourselves.

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
953 Ratings

953 Ratings

MPWHIT ,

Pretty good- Radio Free Mormon is Better

Well done show but Radio Free Mormon Podcast is a little better in my opinion.

jfjsndnc ,

Love this podcast

I have appreciated so many of these interviews! Thank you for the l uplifting and thoughtful content.

ColoradoGirl1 ,

Christ Focused and Thought Provoking

This podcast is amazing!! I started listening to is about a year ago and it quickly became one of my favorites. I think one of the reasons I was drawn to it was the different way that Kurt and so many of his guests think. There are so many new ideas about leadership and the way people see god, and themselves, and others, and how we can break away from doing things because it’s the culture and turn towards doing things because we love god and our fellowmen and want to build Zion. I’ve implemented various ideas I’ve heard in the podcast when I saw they filled a need in leadership positions and also just in my own life with friends and family when I haven’t been in leadership positions and it was so fun to try them out and give people and myself new experiences. Most importantly, Christ is always at the center of the podcast which I really think is what makes the conversations so powerful to me!

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