26 episodes

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

Learn English Through Football languagecaster.com

    • Education

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Africa Cup of Nations Week 1

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Africa Cup of Nations Week 1

    In this football language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game, we look back at the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations that is due to start this weekend in Cameroon. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Africa Cup of Nations Week 1

    DF: Hello again everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team and we hope you are all well and staying safe. I am here in a freezing cold London, while the other member of the Learning English Through Football podcast team, Damon is in Tokyo where I imagine it is also really cold! Now, after a short break over the New Year – the festive period – we have already posted a couple of podcasts in 2022, with Damon talking about ‘heavy metal football‘ and then we did one on a group of phrases all linked to the expression ‘in a row‘ and another on some FA Cup resources after last week’s FA Cup 3rd Round weekend in England – some great resources and materials for learners and teachers of English.

    So, in today’s podcast for all fans of football who want to improve their English skills we look back at the first week of the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations that kicked off last weekend in Cameroon. In order to do this we’ll look at the good, the bad and the ugly from this first week. Of course, there is also a transcript with this listening report which you can use to help with teaching or learning English.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Thai)

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    Introduction

    Okay, this is the 33rd time that the Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON) will take place and it is the first time that Cameroon have hosted the event since 1972. There will be 23 other teams, along with the hosts, hoping to lift the trophy on February 6th after a month of football. The 24 participating sides are divided into six groups of four with the top two from each group and the best four third-place sides all qualifying for the last 16. Similar to the 2020 European Championship which took place in 2021, this tournament should have been played in the previous year but because of the pandemic was switched to 2022.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in French).

    Let’s have a look at some of the good, the bad and the ugly from the first week of the AFCON tournament.

    The Good

    • 7 min
    Learning English Through Football Podcast: FA Cup Learning Resources

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: FA Cup Learning Resources

    In this football language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game, of football, we look back at some of our previous podcasts and posts on the FA Cup. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: FA Cup Learning Resources

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    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team and we hope you are all well. Now, on this short football language podcast we review some of the FA Cup podcast and posts we have created over the past decade here at Languagecaster – hopefully a nice collection of resources for learning and teaching English. We have lots of listening activities such as podcasts with transcripts, as well as vocabulary expressions and quizzes all connected to the men’s FA Cup competition.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (Dulwich Hamlet fan).

    Podcasts

    OK, let’s start by looking at some of the podcasts we have done over the past decade that have featured the FA Cup. Remember all of these shows have a transcript and can be found by clicking on the links in this post here at languagecaster.com.



    2021 FA Cup Final: We discuss some of the language that described Leicester’s first ever FA Cup final victory.

    * 5 Great FA Cup Finals: [from 2013] We look at the biggest upsets, The Merseyside final and Ricky Villa’s goal.

    * 2017 FA Cup Final: in which we looked ahead to the Arsenal vs Chelsea final and explained the word ‘silveware‘. And here is the 2017 FA Cup Third Round Podcast.

    * 1976 FA Cup Final: Damon remembers one of his first ever FA Cup finals on TV

    * The FA Cup in Numbers (1): This report from 2011 looks at some of the numbers associated with the FA Cup – there is a worksheet with this report.

    * The FA Cup Numbers (2): We look at some more numbers connected to the FA Cup (from 2014)

    * The Language of the FA Cup: Back in 2013 we discussed some of the most typical FA Cup phrases, including David and Goliath!

    • 4 min
    Learning English Through Football Podcast: In a row

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: In a row

    In this football language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game, we look at some language that describes a team’s performance over a series of matches, including: ‘in a row‘; ‘consecutively‘ and ‘on the bounce‘. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: In a row

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team and we hope you are all well and staying safe. We also want to wish a Happy New Year to all our listeners around the world. Now, how did your team get on over the festive period? I saw my favourite team Spurs play three times and they picked up seven points with two wins and a draw so not too bad at all.

    Now, on this week’s football language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game, we look at some examples of language that describe a team’s performance over a series or run of matches, including: ‘in a row‘; ‘consecutive‘ and ‘on the bounce‘.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Irish).

    In a row

    Now, in this example here from the BBC looks at whether Celtic could win their tenth Scottish title in a row. So this phrase ‘in a row‘ has a meaning of one after the other – think about it as lining up the games or titles in a line. In football, if we hear this phrase it is usually describing a list of matches that have taken place one after the other. So, an in-form team can maybe win six games in a row – they win six matches one after the other. Of course, we can also use this phrase when a team is not playing so well – when a team loses a number of games in a row it means they have no wins or draws just defeat after defeat.

    On the bounce/On the spin

    So these two phrases also have a similar meaning to the phrase ‘in a row‘ as they both describe how a team performs over a run of matches: on the bounce and on the spin. I think on the bounce is slightly more common than on the spin but you will hear both of these phrases used when describing a good or bad run in football. So in the example from the recent Guardian report on the Spurs win at Watford, it means that even though Watford played well they lost again – they lost for the fourth time in a row, for the fourth time on the spin or on the bounce.

    In succession/Successive/Consecutive

    Another couple of phrases that are used to describe this phenomenon include successive and in succession. In the example from Sky Sports we can see how they describe Manchester City’s 15th win in a row – they won their 15th successive game, while we could also say that they had won their 15th game in succession. Another way of saying this would be that Manchester City won 15 consecutive matches.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Catalan).

    Good Bye

    DF: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com and that message was in Catalan. Right,

    • 4 min
    Heavy Metal Football – Football Language Podcast: 2021-22 Season

    Heavy Metal Football – Football Language Podcast: 2021-22 Season

    This football language podcast looks at the phrase – heavy metal football. This is a quote from the German coach, Jurgen Klopp, and is often used to describe a style of play. The transcript for this podcast is available below, and we also have a massive glossary of footballing phrases here. You can visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts, and if you have any suggestions or questions please contact us at admin@languagecaster.com or leave a question or comment on our forum. (DB=Damon)

    Heavy Metal Football – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

    DB: Hi there everyone. Happy New Year. We hope you are all well and enjoying the football wherever you are. Let’s hope 2022 is a good one, and particularly that we can say goodbye to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    My name’s Damon, one half of the langaugecaster team, and I’m in a chilly January Tokyo. Damian, the other member of the languagecaster team is in London, which I’m guessing is also pretty cold at this time of year. He has been busy over the winter holiday season, posting on football language – stripped of the captaincy and rollercoaster. Check out the podcast on the Women’s FA Cup final between Arsenal and Chelseas too

    On this podcast, I’ll be talking about the phrase ‘heavy metal football‘ and other language related to it.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in German).

    DB: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com, and that message was in German. At the beginning of the year, on the 2nd of January Chelsea played Liverpool in an action-packed game that ended 2-2. It could be described as heavy metal football, a phrase used by Jurgen Klopp in 2013. This phrase is often used to describe fast, exciting football, but what does it mean?

    First of all, Klopp used the phrase to describe the style of football he prefers as a coach. He said in an interview in the Daily Mail –

    “[Arsene Wenger] likes having the ball, playing football, passes. It’s like an orchestra. But it’s a silent song. But I like heavy metal more. I always want it loud,”

    When you use this phrase, you are describing a style of play that involves a lot of pressing, playing a high line, trying to win the ball back as soon as you lose it; basically, as Goal.com says, ‘intense, fast, and energetic’. This definitely describes the Chelsea 2-2 Liverpool game, especially the first half, which saw the four goals scored and both teams pressing and counter pressing.

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    A 100 miles per hour

    DB: So what other phrases are related to this, well, you can say the game was played at 100 miles per hour. This is Skysports using the phrase to describe Liverpool: ‘Liverpool’s utterly unapologetic style – a high line, 100mph, full-backs committing – makes them incredibly potent in the final third.’ 

    100mph emphasises the speed of play: first time passes as well as quick pressing.

    Gegenpress

    And talking of pressing, or quickly putting pressure on the opponent when they receive the ...

    • 5 min
    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2020-21 Women’s FA Cup Final

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2020-21 Women’s FA Cup Final

    In this football language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game, we look at some of the language used to describe the 2021 Women’s FA Cup final between Arsenal and Chelsea. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2020-21 Women’s FA Cup Final Chelsea vs Arsenal

    DF: Hello again everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team and we hope you are all well. Now, on this week’s football language podcast we feature some of the language used to describe the women’s FA Cup final between Arsenal and Chelsea from last weekend’s The Guardian newspaper, including the phrases, ‘unplayable‘ and ‘clip the ball‘.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Greek).

    Unplayable/Secure the treble

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    The Chelsea player Fran Kirby was so good in the final that she was described as ‘unplayable‘ in the report which means that no one could get near her because her level was much higher than anyone else on the pitch. To secure here means to succeed so when it is used with the word treble it means that Chelsea won the third of three titles – they won the treble. This cup win is of course last season’s title (2021) as the tournament was delayed due to Covid and so The Blues, Chelsea, have now completed the domestic (in this case England) treble: the 2020-21 WSL, the Women’s FA Cup and the League Cup.

    Clip the ball/Deliver final blow

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    Australian striker Sam Kerr clipped the ball over the keeper and this way of scoring is similar to dink over the keeper – the player skillfully lifts the ball over the goalkeeper. Clip, like dink,

    • 3 min
    Bounce – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

    Bounce – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

    This football language podcast focuses on one word – bounce. This is used in a variety of phrases in the language of football. The transcript for this podcast is available below, and you can also access our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions please contact us at admin@languagecaster.com or leave a question or comment on our forum. (DB=Damon)

    Bounce – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

    DB: Hello everyone. My name’s Damon, one half of the langaugecaster team. Damian, of course, is the other member of the languagecaster team. I hope he is doing well over in London. As for Tokyo, where I am based – it’s cold and a little bit rainy; winter is coming.

    Thanks for listening to our football language podcast and remember our site is a great place to come if you want to improve your English while also talking about the beautiful game of football.

    OK, today, I’ll be talking about one word – bounce – and how it is used in different phrases in football. Before I do that, if you like what we do here at languagecaster, please show us by leaving comments, sharing our podcasts and posts, and maybe also by leaving a donation to help keep us up and running. We really appreciate everyone who supports us, as it helps keep our website running!

    ** Click below to donate to languagecaster.com and keep the football language coming! **



    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Swahili).

    Bounce

    DB: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com and that message was in Swahili!

    OK, bounce, what does it mean? Well, to bounce is the action a ball makes when it is dropped; it bounces back up. So in a sport with a ball, you can imagine there will be a lot of use for this verb. It is also used as a noun – a bounce: for example, a big bounce means the ball bounced a long way up off the pitch.

    Let’s take a look at some of these uses.

    Bounce off

    This phrase is used a lot to describe when the ball hits a player rather than the player kicking or heading the ball. It is often accidental. The ball can bounce off someone, or bounce off the goal post. You may often hear it with ‘shin’ the part of the leg above the foot and below the knee. Nobody plans to kick the ball with the shin, so if it bounces off the shin, it means it was an accident. It could be lucky or result in a miss. Let’s look at some examples. Here is one from 2020 from the BBC:

    And Norwich’s nightmare continued when Wood eventually gave Burnley the lead- Johann Gudmundsson slipped as he curled it in from the right and it bounced off Wood’s shin as his overhead effort rolled into the bottom corner.

    So this was a lucky bounce. the ball hit the player’s shin and he scored.

    Bounce Back

    Now, our next phrase, bounce back, is not used to talk about the ball but about a team or a player. If a team bounces back from a defeat, it means they perform well after losing their previous match. They are bouncing ‘up’ again – in form or even moving up the table. A player can also bounce back after a poor run of form – several games where they have not played well. If they bounce back, they play really well. Here is an example from a href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/news/aubameyang-arsenal-arteta-update...

    • 5 min

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