2 sec

Lecture 1 Part 2 - Reading and Dyslexia PS2002 Cognitive Psychology 1

    • Social Sciences

You are already an expert in reading. By the age of five you already knew up to 5000 words. By the end of your degree you will probably have read about 20 million words. But reading is not so easy for people who have dyslexia. And for 
the brain, recognising and understanding words on a page is an immensely complex task. For example compare the words ‘Stalk’ and ‘Stork’: words with different spellings can have the same pronunciations, and vice versa; furthermore, same sounding words can have different meanings. This lecture is just the briefest introduction to the cognitive psychology of reading. We will learn about classical cognitive models of reading (specifically reading aloud), and explore the evidence for them from normal reading, and from the strange errors made by stroke victims suffering from acquired dyslexia. 

You are already an expert in reading. By the age of five you already knew up to 5000 words. By the end of your degree you will probably have read about 20 million words. But reading is not so easy for people who have dyslexia. And for 
the brain, recognising and understanding words on a page is an immensely complex task. For example compare the words ‘Stalk’ and ‘Stork’: words with different spellings can have the same pronunciations, and vice versa; furthermore, same sounding words can have different meanings. This lecture is just the briefest introduction to the cognitive psychology of reading. We will learn about classical cognitive models of reading (specifically reading aloud), and explore the evidence for them from normal reading, and from the strange errors made by stroke victims suffering from acquired dyslexia. 

2 sec

More by City, University of London