9 min

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon LadyKflo

    • Arts

Picasso shifted his point of view while working on Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. This perspective change shows in the painting. In fact, he fragmented the figures into ambiguous planes. This gives viewers a sense of looking at them from several angles. We get a combination of views within a single scene.
For instance, the woman at the bottom right squats. Her legs face away from us. But this same woman's head looks straight at us. This serves as the most extreme example of ambiguity.
Read LadyKflo’s collected works and learn about more masterpieces with a click through to LadyKflo's site.
https://www.ladykflo.com/category/masterpieces/
Checkout her socials too:
https://www.instagram.com/ladykflo/
https://twitter.com/ladykflo

Picasso shifted his point of view while working on Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. This perspective change shows in the painting. In fact, he fragmented the figures into ambiguous planes. This gives viewers a sense of looking at them from several angles. We get a combination of views within a single scene.
For instance, the woman at the bottom right squats. Her legs face away from us. But this same woman's head looks straight at us. This serves as the most extreme example of ambiguity.
Read LadyKflo’s collected works and learn about more masterpieces with a click through to LadyKflo's site.
https://www.ladykflo.com/category/masterpieces/
Checkout her socials too:
https://www.instagram.com/ladykflo/
https://twitter.com/ladykflo

9 min

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