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CALI LibTour: An Audio Tour of the Library. Give your students access to this audio on the spot, in your library. Visit the site (http://libtour.classcaster.net) to print a QR code to display by collections in your libraries.

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CALI LibTour: An Audio Tour of the Library. Give your students access to this audio on the spot, in your library. Visit the site (http://libtour.classcaster.net) to print a QR code to display by collections in your libraries.

    Restatements of the Law

    Restatements of the Law

    This LibTour on Restatements of the Law, which you can download here, was written by Keith Ann Stiverson. Keith Ann is Director of the Law Library and Senior Lecturer at Chicago-Kent College of Law.
    LibTour Poster:
    Print the PDF handout and post it close to your library’s collection. Students can scan the QR code to hear the audio file instantly on their smart phones.
    Want to customize? LibTours are licensed under Creative Commons. Find out how else you can use LibTours?
    Transcript:
    Restatements of the Law are published by the American Law Institute (better known as ALI), a prestigious group of legal scholars and experts whose goal is to “restate” the common law rules that have developed in a particular area of law.
    The ALI was founded in the early 1920s after a report was published indicating that developing case law was too complex and uncertain. The goal of the ALI founders was to clarify and simplify the law so as to assure agreement on fundamental principles of our common law system.
    The Restatements are essentially summaries of case law, judge-made doctrines that gradually develop over time. They are well regarded because they are drafted by experts who prepare a tentative draft that is then reviewed by a group of advisers who are also experts. A single restatement project can take 20 years or more to complete.
    This careful process ensures that members of the bench, bar, and the legal academy have reviewed and criticized the final product, so you can see why a restatement is often considered even more influential than a treatise when you are citing authority.
    Note that restatements are not primary authority in any jurisdiction unless the state supreme court adopts restatement language in whole or in part.
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    • 1 min
    Federal Digests

    Federal Digests

    This LibTour on Federal Digests, which you can download here, was written by Sara Gras. Sara is an intern at Brooklyn Law School Library.
    LibTour Poster:
    Print the PDF handout and post it close to your library’s collection. Students can scan the QR code to hear the audio file instantly on their smart phones.
    Want to customize? LibTours are licensed under Creative Commons. Find out how else you can use LibTours?
    Transcript:
    This LibTour Covers Federal Digests. As the body of American case law began growing in the 19th century, it became difficult for practitioners to locate cases on particular topics of law. John B. West, the founder of West publishing and Westlaw, developed a classification system to respond to this problem called the West American Digest system.
    The American Digest System divides the law into major topic categories which are further divided into more specific subcategories – each subcategory is assigned a number.  The number assigned to the subcategory is called a KeyNumber – as in the KEY to your research.
    When a case is published, an attorney editor identifies each point of law contained in the case. These headnotes are assigned a KeyNumber which corresponds to a legal issue discussed in the case.  All of the cases related to any KeyNumber are listed and briefly described in a research tool called a “digest.”  In other words, a digest serves as an index of published case law from individual state courts, specialty courts like the Bankruptcy Courts, and the Federal Courts.
    You are currently looking at the West Federal Practice Digest. You’ll notice that the Digest is organized alphabetically. Let’s assume you would like to locate RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) cases in New York federal courts.
    The first step would be to locate the volume of the digest that contains this issue. As it happens, there are three digest volumes devoted to this topic – 82, 82A, and 82B. If you open Volume 82 and find the beginning of the section on Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations, you will notice a general outline of the subtopics contained within the section, along with the applicable KeyNumbers.
    Looking at this outline is your second step. It can be very helpful in narrowing down the focus of your research since it breaks each legal topic down granularly. For example, you may determine that you are specifically interested in those cases that involve conspiracy, which the outline indicates is KeyNumber 15.
    The next step is to go to the section of the volume where 15 is located and find the cases in the courts you are interested in – you’ll note they are organized alphabetically by state. You will find there are a number of cases in the Eastern and Southern Districts of New York that contain this issue.
    The final step is to always also check the pocket part in the back of the volume to see if any new opinions have been added since the publication of the bound volume.
    It is possible to utilize the Federal Digests to locate cases online when using Westlaw either by searching for a particular KeyNumber in a database, clicking a KeyNumber when reading a case, or utilizing the KeyNumber tools located at the top of the Westlaw screen.
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    • 2 min
    AM JUR Trials

    AM JUR Trials

    This LibTour on AM JUR Trials, which you can download here, was written by Darla Jackson. Darla is the Associate Director of the Law Library at Oklahoma City University School of Law.
    LibTour Poster:
    Print the PDF handout and post it close to your library’s collection. Students can scan the QR code to hear the audio file instantly on their smart phones.
    Want to customize? LibTours are licensed under Creative Commons. Find out how else you can use LibTours?
    Transcript:
    This CALI LibTour covers AM JUR Trials. Published by West, a Thomson Reuters business, American Jurisprudence Trials (commonly referred to as AM JUR Trials) has traditionally been a treatise on trial practice.  West has expanded the treatise to include other dispute resolution forums, such as mediation and arbitration.  So for example, in Volume 118, you’ll find an article discussing mediation and arbitration of family law disputes.
    The multi-volume set was initially published in 1964 and now contains 119 volumes.  The first six volumes, entitled Practice Strategy Controls, cover matters common to all types of trial practice.  The remaining volumes, entitled Model Trials, contain articles detailing the handling of specific types of issues, including criminal, personal injury, and business transactions.   Articles provide guidance on all phases of litigation and dispute resolution, including client interviews, discovery, pleadings, motions, witness examinations, review, and appeals.  The articles feature checklists, model pleadings, discovery and motion forms, sample litigation aids, sample witness examinations and cross-examinations, and sample opening statements, and final arguments.
    AM JUR TRIALS is updated by annual pocket supplements.   The set is accompanied by a separate annual multi-volume softcover index, which is occasionally supplemented with an update pamphlet.   The first volume of the index also contains a Quick Access Guide listing articles by volume and topic.  Index entries are arranged alphabetically by topic; and for volumes 1-76 are pinpointed to volume and page.  Entries for volumes published after volume 76 are pinpointed to the article and section.
    Articles in AM JUR TRIALS, unlike the entries in American Jurisprudence Second and other related sets, are not prepared by the editorial staff of the publisher.  Rather, an experienced lawyer authors each article.  Thus, using AM JUR Trials is an excellent means of obtaining practice advice from experienced lawyers in the trial bar.
    Let’s use AM JUR Trials to find some guidance on a criminal trial issue in the following scenario.  You are serving as the appointed pro bono counsel for an individual charged with rape.  You normally are involved in civil litigation and would like to obtain some general guidance on handling this type of prosecution.  More specifically, you are interested in learning about DNA evidence in a rape prosecution.   Using the List of Articles by Topic provided by the Quick Access Guide in the first volume of the 2010-2011 Edition of the General Index, you find an article entitled “Handling the Defense in a Rape Prosecution” is located in Volume 18 at page 341.  Before you review the article, you want to see if the article addresses DNA evidence.  You locate the term “Rape” in the General Index, but do not find a reference to DNA evidence under the term rape.  Nonetheless you turn to the article and find useful information, including some cross-examination questions for the complaining witness.  Then, you turn to the 2010 pocket supplement in the back of the volume and find that the article has been updated and despite its omission from the index, Section 50.5 in the update addresses DNA evidence in rape prosecutions.
    AM JUR Trials is also available on Westlaw and WestlawNext.   On WestlawNext , the system suggest the resource

    • 3 min
    Law Journals (or Law Reviews)

    Law Journals (or Law Reviews)

    This CALI LibTour on Law Journals, also called Law Reviews, was written by Melanie Oberlin. Melanie is the Instructional Services Librarian at the George Mason University School of Law. You can download the audio file here.
    LibTour Poster:
    Librarians and legal writing professors:  Download the pre-made, letter-sized poster. Print the PDF and post it close to your library’s collection. Students can scan the QR code to hear the audio file instantly on their smart phones.
    Want to customize? LibTours are licensed under Creative Commons. Find out how else you can use LibTours?
    Transcript:
    This CALI LibTour covers law journals, which are also called law reviews. These are scholarly journals with articles about the law.
    Each law journal publishes a few issues per year. New issues are paperback. Some libraries bind a year’s worth together in hardback. Often, the new, paperback issues are located in one place, and the bound volumes are located elsewhere in the library.
    If you look at the front cover of a paperback issue, you see the title of the journal, the volume number, issue number, and date. You see a list of the Articles, Notes, and Comments. Articles are written by professionals – usually law professors, but sometimes practicing judges or attorneys. Notes and Comments are written by students. Each article covers a very specific point of law.
    The specificity is what makes law journal articles a unique secondary source. Remember that secondary sources are writings about the law. The law itself is called a primary source, or primary authority. Law journal articles are similar to treatises – another secondary source – because they are written by an author who knows a lot about the subject, and they include extensive footnotes to primary authority and other secondary authority. If a law journal article is written by a well-known scholar, is published in a well-regarded journal, or includes excellent analysis, it may be cited in legal documents.
    You might use a law journal article to understand a point of law or help craft an argument for a memo or a brief. For example, let’s say that in your Civil Procedure class you learned about pleadings standards, and your professor mentioned Twombly and Iqbal, two Supreme Court decisions about pleadings. You might find law review articles to help you understand these decisions. Each article will provide a brief history about pleading standards, analyze the two decisions in detail, give examples of how the decisions will affect specific cases, and, finally, raise questions about the usefulness of the decisions or suggest how lower courts should apply them.
    To find law journal articles, you could search the “law reviews and journals” database on Westlaw or Lexis. Or, you could use an index to legal periodicals to help you find citations to articles. Law journal articles are available in print, and online at Westlaw, Lexis, HeinOnLine, and at the journal’s website.
    Hopefully, you will find a helpful article that was written recently. You don’t update articles using KeyCite or Shepard’s like you do for cases. Instead, if an article is old or seems out-of-date, you simply look for a newer article on the same subject.
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    • 2 min
    Annotated State Codes

    Annotated State Codes

    This LibTour on Annotated State Codes was written by Sue Altmeyer, Electronic Services Librarian at Cleveland Marshall College of Law. You can download the audio file here.
    LibTour Poster:
    Librarians and legal writing professors:  Download the pre-made, letter-sized LibTour poster. Print the PDF and post it close to your library’s collection. Students can scan the QR code to hear the audio file instantly on their smart phones.
    Want to customize? Find out how else you can use LibTours?
    Transcript:
    This CALI LibTour covers the Annotated State Codes. A state code contains current state legislation arranged by subject.  Each of the fifty states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories have their own code.  Codes are typically organized into broad topics, sometimes called titles, chapters or codes.  For example, in Indiana, Title 6 deals with Taxation while Title 31 deals with Family and Juvenile Law.  As another example, in California, there is a Penal Code, Family Code and a Revenue and Taxation Code, all of which are part of the California Code.
    An annotated code has research references and case summaries underneath each code section.   A research reference directs the reader to text discussions of the statute, as well as to related code sections or regulations.   Case summaries, called “case annotations” are organized into an outline of subtopics to easily find the cases desired.  The annotations are a tremendous aid when researching issues pertaining to a statute.  If the code is published by Westlaw, it will have references to the West Digest.  The West Digest can help locate more cases on point.
    Codes also usually contain state court rules and rules of evidence.  Like the code sections, the rules are annotated: they have case summaries and research references underneath the text of the rule.
    How do you find a code section pertaining to a particular subject?  One can use the index volumes located at the end of the set.  Sometimes there is also an index at the end of each volume. A desired code section can also be located by browsing the table of contents of a code title or chapter.
    Print codes are updated by pocket part inserts at the back of the book or free standing paperback volumes located on the shelf next to the book.  Check the copyright date of the book.  If the book itself is less than one year old, there may not be a pocket part or supplement volume.  To update beyond the pocket parts and supplements, there are paperback volumes at the end of the set containing new Acts.  These are called “Annotated Bulletin”, “Legislative Service” or the like.
    Annotated Codes for all fifty states, DC and the territories are on LexisNexis and Westlaw.  Unannotated Codes are free on the Internet.
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    • 2 min
    Legal Periodicals & Books

    Legal Periodicals & Books

    This LibTour on Legal Periodicals & Books was written by Margaret Krause, Reference Librarian, Georgetown Law Library. You can download the audio file here.
    LibTour Poster:
    Librarians and legal writing professors:  Download the pre-made, letter-sized LibTour poster. Print the PDF, and post it close to your library’s collection. Students can scan the QR code to hear the audio file instantly on their smart phones.
    What Else Can I Do With This?:
    We offer LibTour materials to you under this Creative Commons license. It means those of you at schools and libraries – including law firm and public libraries – can use LibTour about however you want. Just give credit to CALI and don’t turn around and sell our work.
    But, change it around completely, post it on your own site, work it into your library tours, paste all the QR codes onto one handout…whatever you want. Just have fun, be creative, share and let us know what you’re doing with them!
    Transcript:
    This CALI LibTour is an introduction to Legal Periodicals & Books, an index of law review articles and legal books written in the United States,­ Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand. As an undergrad, you might have used the Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature, or WilsonWeb database, to find scholarly journal articles written on a particular subject. For legal literature, the H.W. Wilson Company produces the Legal Periodicals & Books annual indices to assist researchers in locating relevant articles by specific legal subjects.
    Legal Periodicals & Books has been published since 1908, when it was originally titled the Index to Legal Periodicals & Books, or ILP. At that time it indexed just 39 legal publications. Today, articles from over 700 law journals are indexed by author, subject, and jurisdiction. Law review articles are indexed by broad subject areas, such as ethics, judicial independence, and self-incrimination. Researchers can quickly locate articles on a particular subject, by using this controlled vocabulary.
    Today, many researchers use this set of indices as an online database, called Legal Periodicals & Books, which indexes legal articles & books back to 1981. For historical research, the database of Legal Periodicals Retro will offer subject & author access to the articles written from 1908 to 1981.
    Just so you know how this set works, let’s try to locate articles written on the legal questions surrounding detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Let’s start our research in Volume 43, which covers September 2003 to August 2004. By simply looking up Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, which we find on page 742, we can identify a few articles written on this topic. For example, the first article is published in volume 21 of the Berkeley Journal of International Law on pages 662 to 682.
    You’ll also notice on this page, the subject “Guardian and Ward”. Since this is primarily a legal issue legislated at the state level, you will see that the index has sub-headings by state, so you can identify an article on California laws related to guardian and ward.  One other valuable feature of Legal Periodicals & Books is that it includes a Table of Cases and a Table of Statutes. In this volume 43, if you turn to page 1829, you’ll see what I mean. This is helpful if you want to locate law review articles written about a specific case, or a specific statute, such as the Clean Air Act.
    To quickly identify relevant legal literature on a specific topic, make use of the Legal Periodicals & Books in print, or online on Lexis, Westlaw and WilsonWeb.
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    • 2 min

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