14 episodes

Podcast by Wilderness Committee

Line in the Sand Wilderness Committee

    • Education

Podcast by Wilderness Committee

    British Columbia government stops logging in Canadian portion of Skagit Valley

    British Columbia government stops logging in Canadian portion of Skagit Valley

    The British Columbia government has stopped all logging in a Canadian part of the Skagit Valley, which is part of a major salmon producing stream for Puget Sound. The area is known as the “Donut Hole,” or Silverdaisy, and was an unprotected area of land between Manning and Skagit Valley Provincial parks, which are on the Canadian-U.S. border.

    In making the announcement, the B.C. government suspended all licenses to harvest timber in the 14,332-acre area.

    Doug Donaldson, British Columbia’s forests minister, says the government will transfer logging rights to another area of the province.

    "While we are committed to conserving the environment for future generations, we also need to protect forestry jobs as well,” Donaldson said. “To do this, we've been working with the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy to secure access to new harvest areas.”

    A stream near the area feeds into the Skagit River, which is a major source of salmon for Puget Sound. The area also is home to endangered wildlife, such as grizzly bears and spotted owls.

    The announcement does not cover mining interests in the area. Possible sale or transfer of those rights are being negotiated with relevant mining companies.

    Skagit Valley Provincial Park itself was created when Seattle City Light canceled construction of the High Ross Dam in 1984. In return, British Columbia agreed to sell power to Seattle, to compensate for what the hydroelectric dam would have generated.

    In a statement, Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan applauded the announcement, saying she will continue to advocate for total protection of the area from any future mining exploration.

    One of the companies that own mining rights in the area is Imperial Metals. In 2014, a dam holding back mine tailings ruptured near Mount Polley, sending more than 6 billion gallons of mining waste materials into Quesnel Lake.

    • 15 min
    S2: Keeping Watch

    S2: Keeping Watch

    It's back! With Trans Mountain gearing up for construction again, we're launching season two of our Line in the Sand podcast. This week, we’re talking to the environmental monitors who’ve been keeping a watchful eye on the company’s work at the tank farm on Burnaby Mountain. Join us over the coming weeks and months for more stories from the frontlines of the fight against the Trans Mountain pipeline.

    • 3 min
    Mount Polley mine disaster 5 years later

    Mount Polley mine disaster 5 years later

    It’s been over five years since Imperial Metals’ Mount Polley mine tailings dam failed, sending millions of cubic metres of water, slurry, sludge and tailings thundering down Hazeltine Creek and into Quesnel Lake.

    Along with the anniversary was the five-year deadline for federal Fisheries Act charges that expired Sunday, while the possibility of other charges under the same act remains with no timeline for a decision. British Columbia missed the three-year deadline to proceed with charges under both the province's Environmental Management Act and Mines Act.

    • 6 min
    Spotted owls and old-growth logging

    Spotted owls and old-growth logging

    Co-Executive Director Joe Foy talks about the endangered spotted owl and old-growth logging in British Columbia with Chris Cook of Gorilla Radio.

    Gorilla Radio is dedicated to social justice, the environment, community, and providing a forum for people and issues not covered in the corporate media.

    • 25 min
    Bridge Over Troubled Water

    Bridge Over Troubled Water

    Today, we talk to activists from near and far about a valiant action to prevent an oil tanker from leaving port.

    • 4 min
    Kwekwecnewtxw

    Kwekwecnewtxw

    Climate Campaigner Peter McCartney is on the ground at the Kwekwecnewtxw, which translates to "a place to watch from." A Watch House is a traditional structure of the Coast Salish people that has been used for tens of thousands of years to watch for enemies on their territories. Peter talks to Will George, a member of Tsleil-Waututh Nation, about the protests taking place at the Kinder Morgan Westridge Marine Terminal.

    • 3 min

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