10 episodes

To study English is to experience the power of literature, language, and culture. In this video and podcast series, we share the University of Washington English Department’s innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and crafting the stories that animate our world. You can also follow this public scholarship series in video form on our YouTube channel, bit.ly/uwenglyt, or follow us @uw_engl on IG, Twitter, and FB.

Literature, Language, Culture: A Dialogue Series The University of Washington Department of English

    • Education

To study English is to experience the power of literature, language, and culture. In this video and podcast series, we share the University of Washington English Department’s innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and crafting the stories that animate our world. You can also follow this public scholarship series in video form on our YouTube channel, bit.ly/uwenglyt, or follow us @uw_engl on IG, Twitter, and FB.

    Prof. Anis Bawarshi on Genre and Academic Leadership

    Prof. Anis Bawarshi on Genre and Academic Leadership

    University of Washington English Department Chair and Professor, Anis  Bawarshi discusses genre as a form of reading, understanding, and  creating meaning. In this episode you can expect to develop a working  understanding genre theory and how it shapes our day-to-day life, but  also how academic leadership and administration can be a form of hope  and world-building when viewed through a genre theory lens. Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This episode is the tenth in a public scholarship dialogue series from The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 32 min
    Lee Scheingold: Grieving, Sponsoring Public Poetry & Scholarship, & Writing 'One Silken Thread'

    Lee Scheingold: Grieving, Sponsoring Public Poetry & Scholarship, & Writing 'One Silken Thread'

    Lee Scheingold, sponsor of the "Lee Scheingold Lecture in Poetry & Poetics" and "Literature, Language, Culture: A Dialogue Series" shares why she created support for these projects. In this episode, you will learn more about her relationship to grieving her late husband and renowned scholar, Stuart Scheingold, about poetry as a way through grieving, and about what she believes poetry and humanities scholarship can offer for a move love and care. Key texts range from "Grief is the Thing with Feathres" to "One Silken Thread." Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This video is the ninth in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 30 min
    Prof. Josephine Walwema on Ubuntu Ethics and Technical Writing

    Prof. Josephine Walwema on Ubuntu Ethics and Technical Writing

    University of Washington English Department's Assistant Professor, Josephine Walwema discusses Ubuntu Ethics and explores how these ethics connect to the field of Technical Writing. In this episode, you can expect to develop a working understanding of terms in Ubuntu Ethics, but also the deep connections between Ubuntu Ethics and the technical writing community. Key texts range from Desmond Tutu's No Future without Forgiveness to Clifford G. Christians' "Introduction: Ubuntu for Journalism Theory and Practice". Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This video is the eighth in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 22 min
    Prof. Douglas S. Ishii on Crazy Rich Asians, Critical University Studies, and Queer of Color Theory

    Prof. Douglas S. Ishii on Crazy Rich Asians, Critical University Studies, and Queer of Color Theory

    University of Washington English Department's Assistant Professor, Douglas S. Ishii discusses the unexpected connections between films like Crazy Rich Asians and fields such as Critical University Studies and Queer of Color Theory. In this episode you can expect to develop a working understanding the cultural studies terms themselves, but also much of the rich history around the activism and community built along these lines. Key texts range from Fred Moten's The Undercommons to the blockbuster film Crazy Rich Asians. Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This video is the seventh in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 25 min
    Why Study and Teach Medieval Literature Now? Prof. Leila K. Norako on Chaucer, Feminism, & COVID-19

    Why Study and Teach Medieval Literature Now? Prof. Leila K. Norako on Chaucer, Feminism, & COVID-19

    University of Washington English Department's Assistant Professor, Leila K. Norako, shares how reading, teaching, and studying medieval literature informs our understanding and sense of agency during COVID-19. Key texts range from "Bisclavret" by Marie de France to "The Pardoner's Tale" by Geoffrey Chaucer. Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This video is the sixth in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 26 min
    Lydia Heberling on How Reading Multimodal Literature Can Support Indigenous Sovereignty

    Lydia Heberling on How Reading Multimodal Literature Can Support Indigenous Sovereignty

    University of Washington Doctoral Candidate, Lydia M. Heberling shares how reading multimodal literature -- from canoes, to fish, to comics --  can support Indigenous Sovereignty. Key texts range from "Bad Indians" by Deborah A. Miranda to "Second Serving" by L. Frank. As an episode on multimodal knowledges, key forms include wax cylinder recordings, ti'ats, and Grunion fish. Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This video is the fifth in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture"  Series Editor, C. R. Grimmer, and "Literature, Language Culture" Project  Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    • 22 min

Top Podcasts In Education