13 episodes

To study English is to experience the power of literature, language, and culture. In this video and podcast series, we share the University of Washington English Department’s innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and crafting the stories that animate our world. You can also follow this public scholarship series in video form on our YouTube channel, bit.ly/uwenglyt, or follow us @uw_engl on IG, Twitter, and FB.

Literature, Language, Culture: A Dialogue Series The University of Washington Department of English

    • Education

To study English is to experience the power of literature, language, and culture. In this video and podcast series, we share the University of Washington English Department’s innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and crafting the stories that animate our world. You can also follow this public scholarship series in video form on our YouTube channel, bit.ly/uwenglyt, or follow us @uw_engl on IG, Twitter, and FB.

    Pimone Triplett and Charles LaPorte: Gwendolyn Brooks, Terrance Hayes, and “The Golden Shovel”

    Pimone Triplett and Charles LaPorte: Gwendolyn Brooks, Terrance Hayes, and “The Golden Shovel”

    Pimone Triplett and Charles LaPorte discuss how the poetic form from Terrance Hayes' "The Golden Shovel" grew out of deeper history of race and gender in America to help us better contextualize the famous Gwendolyn Brooks poem, "We Real Cool."  Watch the captioned YouTube version of this talk and more: 

    ✔︎ https://bit.ly/TriplettandLaPorte-YT

    This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series Editor, C. R. Grimmer and "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager, Jacob Huebsch.

    • 49 min
    Laura Chrisman and Colette Moore on "Colonization in Reverse"

    Laura Chrisman and Colette Moore on "Colonization in Reverse"

    Professors Laura Chrisman and Colette Moore discuss the different ways  literature and language studies can function together when reading and  teaching historical and literary texts. In this episode, you will learn  more about the poem, "Colonization in Reverse," it's historical context,  and how literature and language studies inform one another. Key texts  include the poem, "Colonization in Reverse" by "Miss Lou" (Louise  Bennett Coverley).

    Watch the youtube version of this talk and more: ✔︎https://youtu.be/99rWCoWNIcM



    About the Series:  This video is both part of the a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture" and the Annual Lee Scheingold Lecture in  Poetry & Poetics. These video and podcast episodes share our  innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring enthusiasm  for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and creative  uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and crafting  the stories that animate our world.   Whether you seek short-form discussions from experts in literature,  language, teaching, and cultural studies, or are simply curious about  our department’s community, you can subscribe to our channel here to  make sure you stay up to date on the series: ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe

    • 35 min
    Geoffrey Turnovsky & Anna Preus on Digital Humanities, Data Science and TEI

    Geoffrey Turnovsky & Anna Preus on Digital Humanities, Data Science and TEI

    Assistant Professor, Anna Preus and Associate Professor Geoffrey Turnovsky discuss the value of the Digital Humanities, including how instructors and students make use of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) in their classrooms, their learning, and in the practice of archiving. In this episode you can expect to develop a working understanding of TEI and how it shapes classroom practices and can be a form of hope when considered in and outside of classroom settings. Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This episode is the eleventh in a public scholarship dialogue series from The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 30 min
    Prof. Anis Bawarshi on Genre and Academic Leadership

    Prof. Anis Bawarshi on Genre and Academic Leadership

    University of Washington English Department Chair and Professor, Anis  Bawarshi discusses genre as a form of reading, understanding, and  creating meaning. In this episode you can expect to develop a working  understanding genre theory and how it shapes our day-to-day life, but  also how academic leadership and administration can be a form of hope  and world-building when viewed through a genre theory lens. Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This episode is the tenth in a public scholarship dialogue series from The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 32 min
    Lee Scheingold: Grieving, Sponsoring Public Poetry & Scholarship, & Writing 'One Silken Thread'

    Lee Scheingold: Grieving, Sponsoring Public Poetry & Scholarship, & Writing 'One Silken Thread'

    Lee Scheingold, sponsor of the "Lee Scheingold Lecture in Poetry & Poetics" and "Literature, Language, Culture: A Dialogue Series" shares why she created support for these projects. In this episode, you will learn more about her relationship to grieving her late husband and renowned scholar, Stuart Scheingold, about poetry as a way through grieving, and about what she believes poetry and humanities scholarship can offer for a move love and care. Key texts range from "Grief is the Thing with Feathres" to "One Silken Thread." Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This video is the ninth in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 30 min
    Prof. Josephine Walwema on Ubuntu Ethics and Technical Writing

    Prof. Josephine Walwema on Ubuntu Ethics and Technical Writing

    University of Washington English Department's Assistant Professor, Josephine Walwema discusses Ubuntu Ethics and explores how these ethics connect to the field of Technical Writing. In this episode, you can expect to develop a working understanding of terms in Ubuntu Ethics, but also the deep connections between Ubuntu Ethics and the technical writing community. Key texts range from Desmond Tutu's No Future without Forgiveness to Clifford G. Christians' "Introduction: Ubuntu for Journalism Theory and Practice". Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

    This video is the eighth in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

    • 22 min

Top Podcasts In Education

Mel Robbins
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
Ashley Corbo
The Atlantic
Rich Roll
Jordan Harbinger