17 episodes

Welcome to LitSciPod: The Literature and Science Podcast! We are eager to talk interdisciplinarity, the similarities and differences between humanities and STEM subjects and feature interviews with leading scholars every episode.

LitSciPod: The Literature and Science Podcast LitSciPod

    • Society & Culture

Welcome to LitSciPod: The Literature and Science Podcast! We are eager to talk interdisciplinarity, the similarities and differences between humanities and STEM subjects and feature interviews with leading scholars every episode.

    Episode 6 - Mind your Matter: Science and Victorian Poetry

    Episode 6 - Mind your Matter: Science and Victorian Poetry

    Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric)
    Music composed and performed by Gareth Jones.

    About the episode:

    The sixth episode of the second series of LitSciPod is all about analogy and language shared between literature (especially poetry), science, and science writing.

    Laura and Catherine are joined by a special guest: Dr Greg Tate (@drgregorytate), Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of St Andrews. Greg shares his research on matter, form, and rhythm in nineteenth century poetry and the physical sciences. He asks why there is so much poetry in the science writing of the period (and even today) and what that says about the connections between literature and science. Greg also discusses how Hardy’s poetry draws on Einstein’s theory of relativity, why the concept of the ether is so important to science and poetry.

    At the end of the episode, you can hear Greg read an excerpt from Mathilde Blind’s The Ascent of Man (1889).

    Episode resources (in order of appearance):

    Introduction:
    Michael Faraday’s letter to sister Margaret quoted in Dafydd Tomos (ed.), Michael Faraday in Wales, including Faraday’s Journal of his Tour through Wales in 1819 (Denbigh, 1972), 58.
    T. S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (1915)
    Robert Frost, ‘A Patch of Old Snow’ (1916)

    Interview:
    Greg Tate, Nineteenth-Century Poetry and the Physical Sciences: Poetical Matter (Palgrave, 2019)
    William Whewell’s review of J. Herschel's Preliminary discourse on the study of Natural Philosophy in The Quarterly Review 45.90 (1831), pp. 374-407.
    Thomas Hardy, ‘The Absolute Explains’ (1924)
    Hilaire Belloc, ‘The Fake Newdigate Poem’ (~1894)
    Patrick Guthrie Tait and Balfour Steward, The Unseen Universe (1875)

    Be sure to check out our new Tumblr page, which includes bonus material for each episode: https://litscipod.tumblr.com/.

    • 53 min
    Episode 5 - Thinking Historically: Public Health and the Military

    Episode 5 - Thinking Historically: Public Health and the Military

    Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric)
    Music composed and performed by Gareth Jones.

    Laura and Catherine are joined by a special guest: Dr Robert C. Engen (@RobertEngen), Assistant Professor in the Department of Defence Studies at the Canadian Forces College. Robert discusses his interdisciplinary research on parallels between the military responses to the 1918 pandemic and the current COVID-19 pandemic, public health and global conflict, a project commemorating the Battle of Hill 70, as well as more recent work on the human dimension of AI in warfare. At the end of the episode, you can hear Robert read an extract from The Glass Bead by Herman Hesse.

    Episode resources (in order of appearance):

    Introduction:
    -Katie Russell, ‘“Arts subjects have as much value as STEM”: the new education campaign tackling the myth of 'soft' degrees’, The Telegraph (25 June 2020)
    -Vanessa Thorpe, ‘University and Arts Council in drive to re-brand “soft” academic subjects’, The Guardian (21 June 2020)

    Interview:
    -Pamela K. Gilbert, Cholera and Nation (2008)
    -Claire Hooker, Chris Degeling and Paul Mason, ‘Dying a Natural Death: Ethics
    -Robert C. Engen, “CAF health protection during pandemic disease events: 1918 and 2020”, Journal of Veteran, Military, and Family Health (preprint, May 2020)
    -Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    -Robert C. Engen, Canadians Under Fire: Infantry Effectiveness in the Second World War (2009)
    -Robert C. Engen, Strangers in Arms: Combat Motivation in the Canadian Army (2016)
    -Robert C. Engen, Douglas Delaney, Meghan Fitzpatric (eds.) Military Education and the British Empire, 1815-1949 (2018)
    -Museum of Healthcare at Kingston - Margaret Angus Fellowship
    -Hill 70 project
    -Robert C. Engen, Inhuman Dimensions of Warfare (blog)

    • 54 min
    Episode 4 - Touching Contagion

    Episode 4 - Touching Contagion

    Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric). Music composed and performed by Gareth Jones.
    Laura and Catherine are joined by a special guest: Dr Kari Nixon (@HalfSickShadows). At the end of the episode, you can hear Kari read the poem ‘Inskripsjoner/Inscriptions’ bilingually in Norweigian and English by Tarjei Vesaas, trans. by Kenneth G. Chapman.
    Episode resources:
    Introduction:

    Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South (1854)
    Aldous Huxley, Brave New World (1932)
    Catherine Charlwood, ‘“Habitually Embodied” Memories: The Materiality and Physicality of Music in Hardy's Poetry’, Nineteenth-Century Music Review (2020) DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1479409819000338
    Sile O’Modhrain and R. Brent Gillespie (2018) ‘Once More, with Feeling: Revisiting the Role of Touch in Performer-Instrument Interaction’. In: Papetti S., Saitis C. (eds) Musical Haptics. Springer Series on Touch and Haptic Systems. Springer, Cham
    Roland Barthes, Mythologies (1957)

    Interview:

    Pamela K. Gilbert, Cholera and Nation (2008)
    Claire Hooker, Chris Degeling and Paul Mason, ‘Dying a Natural Death: Ethics and Political Activism for Endemic Infectious Disease’, in Endemic: Essays in Contagion Theory, ed. by Kari Nixon and Lorenzo Servitje (2016), pp. 265-90
    Anne Finger, Elegy for a Disease: A Personal and Cultural History of Polio (2013)
    Giorgio Agamben, ‘L’invenzione di un’epidemia’ (25 February 2020)
    The Art of Advertising. Bodleian Libraries (March to August 2020)
    Robert Spear. ‘Arrest all dirt and cleanse everything.’ Hudson’s Dry Soap. The Sunday at Home (c. 1889)
    Christopher Pittard, Purity and Contamination in Late Victorian Detective Fiction (2011)
    Henry Stacy Marks. ‘Cleanliness is next to godliness.’ A & F Pears Ltd (c. 1889)
    Judith Walzer Levitt, Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public’s Health (1996)
    Priscilla Wald, Contagious: Cultures, Carriers, and the Outbreak Narrative (2008)
    Ellen Gutoskey, ‘Super Spreader: The Strange Story of Typhoid Mary’, Mental Floss (20 March 2020)
    ‘Influenza’ from the handwritten manuscript magazine for the Myllin Literary and Debating Society, number 1 (1898) held in the National Library of Wales archives
    Kari Nixon, ‘I’m a Mom and a Vaccine Researcher. Here’s Why You Should Vaccinate Your Children’ HuffPost (25 April 2019)
    Welsh Newspapers Online database, National Library of Wales
    ‘Vaccination Exemption’, South Wales Daily News (17 August 1899)

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Episode 4 teaser

    Episode 4 teaser

    Teaser for Episode 4.

    • 1 min
    Episode 3 - Outbreak: A Two Cultures Pinch-Point

    Episode 3 - Outbreak: A Two Cultures Pinch-Point

    Produced by: Catherine Charlwood (@DrCharlwood) and Laura Ludtke (@lady_electric). Music composed and performed by Gareth Jones.

    Laura and Catherine are joined by a special guest: Dr Emilie Taylor-Pirie (@DrETaylorPirie, née Taylor-Brown), an Early Career Academic specialising in the intersections between literature, science and culture. Millie discusses nineteenth-century responses to malaria and how scientists couched their work in imaginative language; how studying a joint honours in English Literature and Biology set her up for an interdisciplinary career; the importance of being prepared for a zombie apocalypse; and much more! At the end of the episode, you can hear Millie read an extract from Henry Seton Merriman’s imperial romance novel With Edged Tools (1894): ‘The Accursed Camp’

    Introduction:


    Kari Nixon, ‘The way we talk about coronavirus matters’, 3 March 2020, CNN.com
    Alice Bennett (@AlicePonderland), ‘A lot of people …’, Twitter, 20 March 2020
    Adrian Bott (@Cavalorn), ‘For those who didn't know …’, Twitter, 20 March 2020
    Susannah Walker (@QuadRoyal), ‘Full evisceration here: …’ Twitter, 20 Mar 2020
    Bex Lewis, Keep Calm and Carry On: The Truth Behind the Poster (2017)
    Angus Calder, The People’s War: Britain 1939–1945 (1992)
    Museum of Healthcare at Kingston (Ontario), ‘Midwifery basin,’ From the Collection
    Amy Davidson Sorkin, ‘The Fever Room: Epidemics and Social Distancing in Bleak House and Jane Eyre’, New Yorker, 20 March 2020
    Charles Dickens, Bleak House (1853)
    ‘Typhus Epidemic’, Evening News (17th Dec 1896), p. 3, Welsh Newspapers Online

    Interview:


    Emilie Taylor-Brown, ‘(Re)Constructing the Knights of Science: Parasitologists and their Literary Imaginations’, Journal of Literature and Science 7.2 (2014) pp.62-79
    M. Easter-Ross, ‘Biblical Physics’, John O'Groat Journal, 30 December 1842, p.4
    Sydney Whiting, Memoirs of a Stomach (1853)
    F. P. Maynard, ‘Notes on the Examination of Malarial Blood’, Indian Medical Gazette 30.11 (1895) pp.412-20 (p.420)
    Ronald Ross, ‘Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, and Cervantes', Science Progress, 11.41 (1916), pp.137-40 (p.137)
    Emilie Taylor-Brown, ‘Death, Disease, and Discontent: The Monstrous Reign of the Supervirus’, in Unnatural Reproductions and Monstrosity: the Birth of the Monster in Literature, Media, and Film eds. Andrea Wood and Brandy Schillace (2014) pp.133-158
    Emilie Taylor-Pirie, 'The Art and Science of COVID-19', 16 March 2020, LinkedIn 
    Center for Preparedness and Response, 'Zombie Preparedness', (page last reviewed Oct 2018), CDC
    https://washyourlyrics.com

    • 54 min
    Episode 3 Teaser

    Episode 3 Teaser

    Coming soon... Outbreak: A Two Cultures Pinch-Point, feat. Dr Emilie Taylor-Brown

    • 1 min

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