100 episodes

Live at the Lortel offers audiences an opportunity to hear from their favorite stage performers and artists in an intimate setting – the 299-seat Lucille Lortel Theatre. Guided by host, interviewer, and professional theatre- lover Eric Ostrow, these conversations dig deep into the artists’ work and career, including past, current, and future projects.

Live at the Lortel: An Off-Broadway Podcast Lucille Lortel Theatre Foundation

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 56 Ratings

Live at the Lortel offers audiences an opportunity to hear from their favorite stage performers and artists in an intimate setting – the 299-seat Lucille Lortel Theatre. Guided by host, interviewer, and professional theatre- lover Eric Ostrow, these conversations dig deep into the artists’ work and career, including past, current, and future projects.

    George Salazar

    George Salazar

    George Salazar is best known for his work on Broadway as “Michael” in the cult sensation Be More Chill, a role for which he won a Lucille Lortel Award, two Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards, and garnered nominations for both Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle Awards. His act two number, “Michael in the Bathroom” has been streamed over 50 million times. His theater credits also include “Seymour,” opposite Michaela Jaé Rodriguez, in the critically-acclaimed Pasadena Playhouse production of Little Shop of Horrors, his Drama Desk-nominated performance as “Grover” and “Mr. D” in The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical, “Michael” in the off-Broadway revival of Jonathan Larson’s tick, tick… BOOM!, David Byrne and Fat Boy Slim’s Here Lies Love, The Broadway revival of Godspell, and more. He has appeared on television as “George Conway” in American Crime Story: Impeachment and recurred as “Eric Sosa” on NBC’s Superstore for two seasons. George is also the voice of “Dad Hatter” in Disney Junior’s animated series, Alice’s Wonderland Bakery.

    Philanthropic/Activist Causes: I’m a huge ally and defender of Trans rights. I also care deeply about immigration/deportation, specifically the string of transfers of incarcerated people who finish their sentences for non-violent crimes only to then be transferred to ICE detainment.

    • 58 min
    Jerry Zaks

    Jerry Zaks

    Jerry Zaks currently directs his 26th Broadway show, The Music Man. He has received four Tony Awards and been nominated eight times. He's also received four Drama Desks, two Outer Critics Circle Awards, and an Obie. His credits include Mrs. Doubtfire, Hello, Dolly!, A Bronx Tale: the musical, Steve Martin’s Meteor Shower, Nantucket Sleigh Ride, Shows For Days, Sister Act, The Addams Family, Guys and Dolls, Six Degrees of Separation, Lend Me a Tenor, House of Blue Leaves, The Front Page, A Funny Thing...Forum, Smokey Joe’s Café, Anything Goes, La Cage aux Folles, Little Shop of Horrors, The Man Who Came to Dinner, The Foreigner, A Bronx Tale, Laughter on the 23rd Floor, and the original production of Assassins. He began his career directing the extraordinary plays of Christopher Durang including Sister Mary Ignatius..., Beyond Therapy, Baby with the Bath Water, and The Marriage of Bette and Boo. He directed the award-winning film Marvin’s Room, starring Meryl Streep and Diane Keaton; and Who Do You Love, which was featured in the Toronto Film Festival. Mr. Zaks is a founding member, and serves on the board, of the Ensemble Studio Theater. He received the SDC’s George Abbott Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre.

    Philanthropic/Activist Causes: Ensemble Studio Theatre

    • 55 min
    Danielle Brooks

    Danielle Brooks

    Grammy Award winning & Tony Award Nominated Actress Danielle Brooks most recently starred on Broadway in The Piano Lesson opposite Samuel L. Jackson and John David Washington. The play is directed by LaTanya Richardson Jackson. Brooks previously starred on Broadway as “Sofia” in the Tony Award winning revival of The Color Purple. Later this year, she will star in Warner Brothers’ feature film adaptation of the musical directed by Blitz Bazawule. Brooks stars opposite John Cena on the hit HBO Max series Peacemaker, the spinoff series to James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad movie. Brooks starred as the legendary Gospel singer Mahalia Jackson in Mahalia. For her performance, Brooks earned the “Actress Award for Television” from the Critics Choice Association Celebration of Black Cinema & Television. Additionally, Brooks was nominated for a Critics Choice and a NAACP Image Award. Danielle Brooks starred as "Tasha 'Taystee' Jefferson" in Netflix’s Emmy nominated series Orange is the New Black. Danielle is the co-founder of “Black Women on Broadway,” which honors the legacy of Black Women’s contributions to the theatre.

    Philanthropic/Activist Causes: Black Women on Broadway

    • 58 min
    Fedna Jacuqet

    Fedna Jacuqet

    Actor/writer/director FEDNA JACQUET most recently starred as Passenger 1 in the critically acclaimed Lee Daniel's production of Ain’t No Mo for its Broadway and Off-Broadway runs. As a writer and director, her film Chante Maman Mwen (My Mother’s Song) most recently was honored at the Urbanworld Film Festival in NYC. She is a 2020-2022 National Black Theatre Playwright in Residence, 2019-2021 Huntington Theatre Playwriting Fellow, and a 2019 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellow in Playwriting/Screenwriting. Written work for the screen includes Isaiah (ABFF/TV One Screenplay Competition Finalist), Homebase (Juilliard/NYU Grad Acting), Inheritance (2020 Tribeca Chanel Through Her Lens Finalist), and Going Home. Written plays include Pefeksyon (Playwright's Realm Finalist, DVRF Finalist, Studio Tisch), Inheritance (Classical Theatre of Harlem Playwright's Playground, Studio Tisch), Gurlfriend, and Heroes.

    Philanthropic/Activist Causes: The Steppingstone Foundation

    • 55 min
    Camille A. Brown

    Camille A. Brown

    Camille A. Brown - (Director/Choreographer) 3-time Tony award nominee is the first Black woman to direct and choreograph a play on Broadway in 67 years. Ms. Brown choreographed the Met Opera's critically acclaimed Porgy and Bess and Terrence Blanchard's Fire Shut Up in My Bones, which she also co-directed with James Robinson, making her the first Black director of a Met mainstage production. She is also the founder and director of Camille A Brown and Dancers. Awards include the 2021 ISPA/International Society for the Performing Arts Distinguished Artist Award, 2020 Dance magazine Award, Bessie Award (Mr. TOL E. RAncE), Jacob's Pillow Dance Award, Doris Duke Artist Award, United States Artists Award and five Princess Grace Awards. Foundation fellowships from Ford Art of Change, Guggenheim, TED, Emerson Collective. In addition to a Tony Award nomination, Camille has received an Obie Award, two AUDELCO Awards, three Drama Desk nominations and three Lortel nominations.

    Philanthropic/Activist Causes: Every Body Move and Social Dance for Social Change 

    • 54 min
    Jessica Stone

    Jessica Stone

    Jessica Stone (Director) worked as an actress on and Off-Broadway, in television, and in film before transitioning to directing. Her directing career began in earnest with her all-male 2010 production of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum for the Williamstown Theatre Festival. She has since been directing all over the country at such theaters as The Old Globe, A.C.T, Shakespeare Theatre Company, Huntington Theatre Company, Two River Theatre Company, and the Williamstown Theatre Festival, among others. Productions include As You Like It, Kate Hamill’s Vanity Fair, Barefoot in the Park, Dancing at Lughnasa, Bad Dates, Ken Ludwig’s Robin Hood! (world premiere), Ripcord, Bad Jews, Arms and the Man, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, Charlotte’s Web, June Moon, Last of the Red Hot Lovers, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, and Absurd Person Singular.

    Philanthropic/Activist Causes: Mentoring young theater artists, gun safety, and helping unregistered and low propensity voters to participate in our democracy.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
56 Ratings

56 Ratings

Brainiomoocow ,

Brilliant and important

Host Eric Ostrow is not only knowledgeable and charming, but he takes the interviews into territory that is much deeper and more important than mere performances. He delves into poignant human issues and vital social concerns with wit and warmth.

Donny Repsher ,

Thank You

I want you to know how grateful I am for Live at the Lortel. Before the quarantine, I can’t describe what it felt like to walk into a space like the Lucille Lortel. What a gift it was to be in the same room as these artists I so admire, whose careers I follow so closely, whose work I have been so fortunate to see across New York. I love your podcast because I believe it is the closest thing we have to the legacy left by James Lipton and Inside the Actors Studio. Nowhere else are we given long-form, deep-dive conversations, by artists, for artists, about craft, career, about what it means to be a human being and an artist, to work and to live making a life in the American theatre.

I’m writing because I have seen the changes you’ve made in Season Two of the podcast, and I know how valuable feedback can be to service delivery—especially in the shifting landscape we’ve found ourselves in. We are witnessing a sea change across the performing arts sector, a call for real transformation within all our platforms—to be intentional about the voices that we are lifting up, about the stories we’re telling and who we’re asking to tell those stories.

This is why I think it’s so important that we’re seeing platforms like Live at the Lortel recognize and so nimbly embrace this call for greater intentionality. I share your belief that we must center those voices we’ve for so long kept at the margins, because we must ultimately be led by those artists towards this future we seek—a more equitable, justice-oriented future. In a moment of true upheaval, I believe Live at the Lortel is chief among the platforms carrying this torch forward for us all.

I think you’re doing important work. We are living through a moment when artists so desperately need to hear from other artists. The hour you give to each of your guests is, without fail, such a rich, nourishing, healing hour of conversation. I look forward to everything you have in store for us in the future. We need you.

Thank you for all you do.

jonesthingNYC ,

Creative Director, Dream Out Loud Media

Live at the Lortel is a delight! Host Eric Ostrow is the perfect blend of well researched, passionate, effortlessly witty & warmly intimate. Each episode has the feel of a spontaneous, wondrous & fortuitous hang out with some of the most talented, generous & bright creators you've ever hoped to meet.
With a focus on & access to Off Broadway talent, Live at the Lortel is sharing some of the most interesting & diverse voices in American theatre. It's easy to become jaded by self promotional, clever, press junket tales of show business insiders.
In contrast, Eric Ostrow takes the time & does the work to dig deeper, seek out innovators & make us all feel like we're chatting together in the family room over coffee or a cocktail. You'll leave inspired.
Bravo!

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