100 episodes

Houston Chronicle reporters Marissa Luck and Rebecca Schuetz talk to the region's developers, deal makers and dreamers about all things Houston and real estate.

Looped In Houston Chronicle

    • Business
    • 4.4 • 91 Ratings

Houston Chronicle reporters Marissa Luck and Rebecca Schuetz talk to the region's developers, deal makers and dreamers about all things Houston and real estate.

    What a controversy in Beyonce's old neighborhood tells us about historic districts

    What a controversy in Beyonce's old neighborhood tells us about historic districts

    In a city with virtually no official zoning, the ability to create a historic district over a particular neighborhood is supposed to be a key tool Houstonians can use to preserve the character of a place. But in the case of one historically Black community in Houston’s Third Ward, called Riverside Terrace, residents were convinced a proposed historic district would actually lead to more unwanted change – gentrification – not less of it. In this episode, Rebecca and Marissa talk to reporter Nora Mishanec about the controversy sparked by the now failed Riverside Terrace historic district proposal and how it shines a light on situations when these special designations may actually become instruments of exclusion rather than inclusion.

    Read more on HoustonChronicle.com:

    18 Houston homes could become a historic district. Some residents fear they're losing control.

    Proposed Riverside Terrace historic district has longtime residents fighting for their neighborhood

    Turner pulls plan for Riverside Terrace historic district amid opposition from Third Ward residents

    A 2-year journey to remove racist deed language was finally solved thanks to new Texas law
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    • 30 min
    How a nonprofit puts the "choice" back in housing choice vouchers

    How a nonprofit puts the "choice" back in housing choice vouchers

    A federal program is meant to give low-income families the freedom to choose where they live. But most landlords are not interested in participating, put off by requirements such as lengthy inspection periods and the prospect that the voucher might not meet them where the market is, relegating families with vouchers to the few properties that accept the housing subsidy. The Houston nonprofit NestQuest has set out to change that.

    READ: Houston nonprofit tackles headaches with rent voucher program

    Connect with Rebecca
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    • 16 min
    Why downtown Houston will never be the same

    Why downtown Houston will never be the same

    More than two years after lockdowns turned downtown into an apocalyptic landscape of darkened towers and deserted streets, downtown Houston is coming back to life. While it hasn’t completely recovered yet, people are once again crowding into Astro’s games, catching concerts at Jones Hall, cruising through Discovery Green Park and converging at large events and conferences. Their return has boosted sales for hotels and some restaurants.But there’s a critical element missing: the 168,600 office workers that used to flow into the central business district every weekday. With hybrid work here to stay, the downtown economy is undergoing a fundamental shift. We sit down with Kris Larson and Angie Bertinot of Central Houston, a nonprofit focused on economic development in downtown, to discuss where the downtown is going post pandemic.

    CONNECT with Marissa Luck and Rebecca Schuetz.MORE: The 5-day, in-person workweek is mostly dead. What does that mean for downtown Houston?

    Houstonians are out to play, fueling a revival for downtown's hotels and venues
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    • 34 min
    FOMO, and why that phrase “housing bubble” keeps bubbling up

    FOMO, and why that phrase “housing bubble” keeps bubbling up

    A new paper by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas warns we may be in a housing bubble, driven by fear of missing out (FOMO) in the market as prices surge and mortgage rates rise. But it’s a tricky thing defining a bubble, and even then, bubbles don't necessarily pop — Rebecca Schuetz and Marissa Luck talk to Enrique Martinez-Garcia and Laila Assani, Dallas Fed economists, about how home prices are outstripping wages and rents and what that means for Texans.

    Read the Dallas Fed paper:Real-Time Market Monitoring Finds Signs of Brewing U.S. Housing BubbleRead the story by Marissa Luck and Katherine Feser:Houston homebuyers grasping for any deal in red-hot market may get shut out by higher mortgages
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    • 23 min
    Hello, hybrid

    Hello, hybrid

    A hybrid workplace is emerging as the new normal for office workers post pandemic. But how will splitting their time between their pajamas and their pumps impact the way employees work? Can cubicles cut it anymore now that employees have grown accustomed to lounging on their patio or taking a walk on a lunch break? We talk with two thought leaders at global architecture firm Gensler’s Houston office – Dean Strombom and Vince Flickinger – about how companies are rethinking their physical space in the pandemic. Hint: It’s not just about reducing real estate footprints.

    READ: Shell’s pilot office design in Houston offers a peek at the hybrid workplace of the future

    More stories by Marissa Luck and Rebecca Schuetz on HoustonChronicle.com.

     
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    • 27 min
    What’s up with Luby’s?

    What’s up with Luby’s?

    Luby’s, a cafeteria-style restaurant, is so ingrained in Texas culture that the TV series “King of the Hill” has a character named after its signature platter. So when Luby’s board voted to liquidate the brand, many were shocked. But — as Amanda Drane, who formerly covered retail for the Houston Chronicle, tells Rebecca Schuetz — liquidating Luby’s is different than Luby’s disappearing.

    READ: A Chicago catering entrepreneur bought Luby's. Here's what happens next for the Houston brand.
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    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
91 Ratings

91 Ratings

GimmeDatThang ,

Look Forward to Every Episode.

Now that Swamplot.com is no more I look to this podcast for what’s happening. Would like a bit more in-depth conversation in the topics discussed making it a longer show. Would like to see a video version as well. Still enjoying the podcast. 👍🏽

Zombified2 ,

We need more shows

I love to hear about all of the different developments in Houston and the different areas! I love the history, gossip and guests. It’s fast paced and fun for all. I feel like it’s not as frequent.

Changben ,

I love it

This show is informative and fun, local and down to earth. Great job, keep it up, more listeners will follow

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