31 episodes

In fall 2008, members of the Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies course at Colgate University embarked on a collaborative project to understand and interrogate 20th century histories of war and violence, as well as its resolutions. As part of this endeavor, students and faculty analyze and disseminate information about marginalized conflicts. By ‘marginalized’ we mean conflicts left unaddressed – either in our class examination or in the broader frame of existing historical knowledge. We aim to shock, surprise, and provoke reflection.

Marginalized Conflicts Colgate University

    • Education
    • 4.5 • 2 Ratings

In fall 2008, members of the Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies course at Colgate University embarked on a collaborative project to understand and interrogate 20th century histories of war and violence, as well as its resolutions. As part of this endeavor, students and faculty analyze and disseminate information about marginalized conflicts. By ‘marginalized’ we mean conflicts left unaddressed – either in our class examination or in the broader frame of existing historical knowledge. We aim to shock, surprise, and provoke reflection.

    Violence in Southern Thailand - Tyrell Haberkorn, postdoctoral fellow in Peace & Conflict Studies

    Violence in Southern Thailand - Tyrell Haberkorn, postdoctoral fellow in Peace & Conflict Studies

    In July 2007, nearly 400 citizens were arrested as suspected "terrorists" involved in Islamic insurgency in the three southern-most provinces of Thailand. Denied knowledge of the evidence against them, they were given the option of being formally charged under the criminal code or undergoing a four-month "occupational training" course. This podcast examines these detentions as part of the spectrum of violence in southern Thailand.

    • 9 min
    The Cambodian Genocide and the Continuing Effects of War after Conflict Resolution - Katherine Clark '11

    The Cambodian Genocide and the Continuing Effects of War after Conflict Resolution - Katherine Clark '11

    On April 17, 1975, the Khmer Rouge invaded the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh, and drove the inhabitants of the city to the countryside. The new leadership forced city-dwellers into agricultural communes, with hopes of bringing Cambodia into a new era. Any resistance to the new movement was met with violence and execution. During the period that followed over two million people perished in the Cambodian Genocide. However, the death toll did not end with conflict resolution. Instead, land mines, a product of the civil unrest, violence, and hatred, continue to kill and maim civilians. The number of casualties from land mines are much too high through out Cambodia and in over 65 other countries. What are the implications of such statistics?

    • 12 min
    The Armenian Genocide - Miriam Neustadt '11

    The Armenian Genocide - Miriam Neustadt '11

    From 1915 to 1918, the Ottoman Empire, today known as Turkey, brutally and systematically murdered 1.5 million Armenian Christians. The event was considered quite successful. In fact, predecessors like Adolf Hitler followed the model of the Ottoman government when organizing his Holocaust during WWII. Considered the first modern genocide, the Armenian Genocide still goes formally unrecognized in Turkey and the United States. How can such atrocity go unrecognized after ninety years?

    • 8 min
    The Lost Boys of Sudan - Olivia Straub '12

    The Lost Boys of Sudan - Olivia Straub '12

    Beginning in 1983, the Northern Sudanese government began launching attacks on Southern villages. Many people died in these vicious attacks; however, one group of people did survive. The Lost Boys of Sudan are a group of 7 to 17 year old boys who walked over 500 miles to escape the violence occurring in their homeland.

    • 8 min
    The Massacre in Drencia, Kosovo - Bardha Ajeti '12

    The Massacre in Drencia, Kosovo - Bardha Ajeti '12

    Fifty-eight ethnic Albanians, including Adem Jashari, the leader of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), were massacred by the Serbian police in hopes of suppressing the independence movement in Kosovo. The massacre resulted in the war in Kosovo between the years 1998-1999. This podcast unravels the events before, during and after that unfortunate day.

    • 7 min
    The Democratic Republic of Congo - Christopher Dixon '12

    The Democratic Republic of Congo - Christopher Dixon '12

    From the time of Leopold II to the turn of the century, the Congo has been ruled ruthlessly by self serving autocrats. Resources in the region are vital to today's global economy but have been the cause of conflict for the past 125 years. Proxy militia groups now divide and terrorize the Congolese people and weaken the DRC's government. This podcast gives a brief insight in to the history of the Democratic Republic of Congo as well as the issues the country faces today.

    • 13 min

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