61 episodes

MCN's mission is to grow the digital capacity of museum professionals by connecting them to ideas, information, opportunities, proven practices, and each other. This audio collection contains recorded sessions from previous conferences, topical webinars, continuing educational lessons, and conversations between musetech professionals.

MCN Audio Collection MCN (Museum Computer Network)

    • Education

MCN's mission is to grow the digital capacity of museum professionals by connecting them to ideas, information, opportunities, proven practices, and each other. This audio collection contains recorded sessions from previous conferences, topical webinars, continuing educational lessons, and conversations between musetech professionals.

    GLAM Collections on Social Media: Navigating Copyright Questions

    GLAM Collections on Social Media: Navigating Copyright Questions

    Anne, Director of Legal Affairs & Intellectual Property at Newfields and editor of the book "Rights and Reproductions: The Handbook for Cultural Institutions", Aleksandra Strzelichowska, Collections Engagement Team, Senior Online Marketing Specialist from Europeana, and Mikka Associate General Counsel at the J. Paul Getty Trust.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Copyright & Open Access for GLAMs in the age of COVID19

    Copyright & Open Access for GLAMs in the age of COVID19

    SPEAKERS:

    Ariadna Matas, Copyright Policy Advisor, Europeana Foundation

    Sarah Pearson, Legal Counsel, Creative Commons

    Andrea Wallace, Lecturer in Law, Exeter University

    Organized by the Special Interest Group on Intellectual Property, Museum Computer Network and friends from the Open GLAM community!

    The current global health emergency forced libraries and museums to organize digital engagement strategies, from #MuseumFromHome to making digital broadcasts. However, this doesn’t mean that copyright laws have been suspended from working. How do we deal with copyright in this public health emergency? What are the important things we need to be looking at when we make our digital engagement strategies? Where can we go to find openly available content from museums and libraries? How do we make sure that we can legally preserve some of the current records being created by these digital engagement strategies?

    • 54 min
    We Are Nature, Storytelling in VR: How A Physical Exhibition Became a Virtual Experience

    We Are Nature, Storytelling in VR: How A Physical Exhibition Became a Virtual Experience

    Friday, November 8, 2019

    The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh was interested in creating a virtual experience of We Are Nature: Living in the Anthropocene, an exhibition that looks at how human behavior is impacting the Earth and creating what some scientists call a new era. The exhibition invited visitors to explore the evidence and to consider how the changes that are occurring affect their lives in practical ways. The museum's goal is to reach a wider audience with this story and to convince funders to support an expanded version of the exhibition.

    GuidiGO, in collaboration with MediaCombo, produced the virtual and interactive tour experience of “We Are Nature: Living in the Anthropocene." Users can visit the entire exhibition with an Oculus Go headset and "wander" into the gallery as if they were visiting a real space with interactive hotspots. The experience is based on a 3D capture of the exhibition shot in photogrammetry in August, 2018, as well as more than 150 HD 360 panoramas.

    Panelists will talk about their collaboration and what they learned along the way about creating a completely new version of a museum exhibition, and the different objectives this project can achieve.

    Session Type30-Minute Session (Presentation or Case Study)

    TrackExperience
    Chatham House RuleNo

    Key Outcomes

    - hear first hand about the work flow between one museum and two vendors to produce this product
    - gain a better understanding of how to apply VR to the exhibition experience
    - consider how creating a virtual reality version of one of their museum's exhibitions would benefit their institution
    - consider other ways to enhance the VR experience to provide more information for visitors
    - experience We Are Nature exhibition in an Oculus Go headset and compare that to the desktop experience

    Speakers

    Session Leader : Robin White Owen, Principal, MediaCombo

    Speaker : Becca Schreckengast, Director of Exhibition Experience, Carnegie Museum of Natural History

    Speaker : David Lerman, CEO, GuidiGO

    • 29 min
    Rethinking Digital Platforms in Order to Achieve Authentic Community Representation

    Rethinking Digital Platforms in Order to Achieve Authentic Community Representation

    Friday, November 8, 2019

    In the Fall of 2018, de Young Museum organized a pioneering exhibition entitled, ‘Contemporary Muslim Fashions’. The exhibition focused on the complex, diverse nature of Muslim dress codes worldwide. As we were the first major US museum to have ever explored this topic, we were up against a large amount of misinformation and Islamophobia. The questions quickly became: how do we educate our visitors on this subject while ensuring the museum is a welcoming environment to the Muslim community? We will tell the story of how we created a Facebook Group within the official museum Facebook page that grew to 500+ members sharing discussions on Muslim fashion, what it’s like to be Muslim in America, etc. These weren’t topics this community would have felt comfortable discussing in a public digital space, but by carving out a platform within our brand’s ecosystem, we fostered discussion that led to productive community engagement. By integrating representation and community outreach into our digital strategies rather than layering it on top simply for show, we can build spaces that amplify the voices of our communities and build more authentic connections.

    Session Type30-Minute Session (Presentation or Case Study)

    TrackContent
    Chatham House RuleNo

    Key Outcomes

    After attending this session, participants will have tangible examples of ways they can more authentically engage the communities they strive to represent. They will have guidance on how to broach intimidating topics and speak authentically, even when their staff may not represent the voices they aim to amplify.
    By learning to ask the right questions, create with a purpose, and set clear goals at the outset of a project, attendees will also now be able to create more effective digital platform strategies by asking, “What is our goal in creating content for this platform? Who is our audience? What will they get out of this, and will they feel represented?”

    Speakers

    Session Leader : Jessie Ayala, Digital Engagement Manager, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

    Co-Presenter : Miriam Newcomer, Director of Communications, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

    • 34 min
    Push/Pull/Partner: Content Strategies for Community Engagement

    Push/Pull/Partner: Content Strategies for Community Engagement

    Friday, November 8, 2019

    How can museums utilize technology to co-create content with the public in ways that feel equitable and rewarding to all parties? Through our digital interpretive practice, Mia has come to view its work in relation to the public in rough terms of push, pull, and partner. We broadcast (“push”) museum-generated content; we commission (“pull”) content from members of the public. And sometimes we share authority over decision-making and content development (“partner.”) This panel will present two of Mia’s digital content partnerships through this push/pull/partner schema.

    In one case, Mia sought to co-develop digital interpretive materials about traditional Somali artworks with Somali students enrolled in a University of Minnesota course on oral history. This project challenged our assumptions about how and when to use digital tools and the necessity of partnership and shared commitment to see a project through. We will also present our use of Hearken, a digital tool designed for public media newsrooms, to partner with our public on the development of an interpretive strategy for a Buddhist sculpture exhibit.

    We will conclude with a set of considerations to bring to future opportunities to partner with the public on digital content creation in meaningful and dynamic ways.

    Session Type30-Minute Session (Presentation or Case Study)

    TrackContent
    Chatham House RuleNo

    Key Outcomes

    Attendees will:

    Learn how to strategically craft museum/community content partnerships that adapt to the skillsets and knowledge bases of the participants

    Learn how and when to leverage technology based on community partners

    Gain insight into how to manage through ambiguity

    Think critically about the factors - funding, timeline, staffing - lead to successful projects

    Speakers

    Session Leader : Alex Bortolot, Content Strategist, Minneapolis Institute of Art

    Co-Presenter : Gretchen Halverson, Digital Program Coordinator, Minneapolis Institute of Art

    • 34 min
    Patron-Participatory Machine Learning through in-gallery Interactives

    Patron-Participatory Machine Learning through in-gallery Interactives

    Friday, November 8, 2019

    Over the course of the Collections as Data: Part to Whole project, Carnegie Museum of Art has not only increased points of access as related to the Teenie Harris collection data, but we are currently expanding our role as stewards by building in-gallery interactives for the public. Significantly, new information gathered from these interactives will then become a part of the collections as data that is then provided back into the community, beginning the cycle all over again. In the fall of 2019, CMOA will open a semi-permanent exhibition and community engagement space in its permanent galleries. This will be a dedicated Teenie Harris gallery space for exhibitions, community relations, and the omni-directional exchange of information with the public. This space will be staffed periodically by “citizen archivists” who will have a public facing presence to aid patrons in research and retrieval of images, as well as collecting image information of the who/where/when/why of Harris images. In addition to prints and gallery panels, these interactives will allow patrons to engage with faceted search, heat maps using GIS technology, personal and family identification using facial recognition technology, and public history using an amalgamation of newly developed programming.

    Session Type30-Minute Session (Presentation or Case Study)

    Chatham House RuleNo

    Key Outcomes

    After this session, attendees will walk away with concrete examples of how to consciously uplift the voice of under documented communities simultaneously within the walls of powerful institutions. All while using technology that has traditionally silenced those same under documented voices.

    Speakers

    Session Leader : Dominique Luster, Teenie Harris Archivist, Carnegie Museum of Art

    Co-Presenter : Charlene Foggie-Barnett, Teenie Harris Archive Specialist, Carnegie Museum of Art

    • 29 min

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