58 episodes

The METRANS Transportation Center is a US DOT University Transportation Center (UTC). Established in 1998 through the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), METRANS is a joint partnership of the University of Southern California and California State University, Long Beach. Under the UTC program, federal funding requires a dollar-for-dollar match with non-federal funds. The California State Department of Transportation (Caltrans) provides the full non-federal match to METRANS.

METRANS is the first and largest UTC in Southern California, home to nearly 2/3 of the state's population, and in GNP equivalent the 10th largest economy in the world. The Los Angeles region is also the most congested metropolitan area in the US and the only one in the 2004 State of California "extreme" non-attainment category for ozone. The region is a center for international trade: the Los Angeles/ Long Beach port complex is the largest container port in the US (Total Cargo Value: over $378 billion FY 2007); and LAX is the 4th largest air freight center in the US, following only Memphis, the FedEx hub, and Anchorage. As a center of both international trade and immigration, it is home to both extreme wealth and extreme poverty, and has one of the largest transit-dependent populations in the country. METRANS is committed to addressing the transportation challenges of regions such as Los Angeles.

METRANS' mission is to solve transportation problems of large metropolitan regions through interdisciplinary research, education and outreach. The University Transportation Center program has three objectives:

• Foster independent, high quality research to solve the nation's transportation problems
• Train the next generation transportation workforce
• Disseminate information, best practices, and technology to the professional community

METRANS accomplishes these objectives through a comprehensive and collaborative program of research, education, information dissemination and technology transfer organized around four topical focus areas. The main focus is goods movement and international trade, accounting for about half of all METRANS research and most of METRANS outreach and information dissemination activities. The second focus area is mobility of urban populations, with special emphasis on public transportation, and accounting for about one third of METRANS research. Highway infrastructure, and safety, security and vulnerability are relatively new topic areas.

The partnership of USC and CSULB brings together two large urban universities (a combined student body of about 65,000) with complementary strengths. USC is among the nation's leading research universities, and CSULB is one of the largest teaching universities in California. Participating faculty come from several fields of engineering, as well as planning, public policy, public administration, economics, and geography. USC offers PhD and masters programs with transportation specialization in engineering, urban planning, public policy, and public administration. CSULB offers an interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Global Logistics. Professional development programs are offered through its Center for International Trade and Transportation at the College of Continuing and Professional Education.

METRANS Transportation Center - USC and CSULB University of Southern California

    • News
    • 5.0, 2 Ratings

The METRANS Transportation Center is a US DOT University Transportation Center (UTC). Established in 1998 through the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), METRANS is a joint partnership of the University of Southern California and California State University, Long Beach. Under the UTC program, federal funding requires a dollar-for-dollar match with non-federal funds. The California State Department of Transportation (Caltrans) provides the full non-federal match to METRANS.

METRANS is the first and largest UTC in Southern California, home to nearly 2/3 of the state's population, and in GNP equivalent the 10th largest economy in the world. The Los Angeles region is also the most congested metropolitan area in the US and the only one in the 2004 State of California "extreme" non-attainment category for ozone. The region is a center for international trade: the Los Angeles/ Long Beach port complex is the largest container port in the US (Total Cargo Value: over $378 billion FY 2007); and LAX is the 4th largest air freight center in the US, following only Memphis, the FedEx hub, and Anchorage. As a center of both international trade and immigration, it is home to both extreme wealth and extreme poverty, and has one of the largest transit-dependent populations in the country. METRANS is committed to addressing the transportation challenges of regions such as Los Angeles.

METRANS' mission is to solve transportation problems of large metropolitan regions through interdisciplinary research, education and outreach. The University Transportation Center program has three objectives:

• Foster independent, high quality research to solve the nation's transportation problems
• Train the next generation transportation workforce
• Disseminate information, best practices, and technology to the professional community

METRANS accomplishes these objectives through a comprehensive and collaborative program of research, education, information dissemination and technology transfer organized around four topical focus areas. The main focus is goods movement and international trade, accounting for about half of all METRANS research and most of METRANS outreach and information dissemination activities. The second focus area is mobility of urban populations, with special emphasis on public transportation, and accounting for about one third of METRANS research. Highway infrastructure, and safety, security and vulnerability are relatively new topic areas.

The partnership of USC and CSULB brings together two large urban universities (a combined student body of about 65,000) with complementary strengths. USC is among the nation's leading research universities, and CSULB is one of the largest teaching universities in California. Participating faculty come from several fields of engineering, as well as planning, public policy, public administration, economics, and geography. USC offers PhD and masters programs with transportation specialization in engineering, urban planning, public policy, and public administration. CSULB offers an interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Global Logistics. Professional development programs are offered through its Center for International Trade and Transportation at the College of Continuing and Professional Education.

    • video
    Measure M: Yes or No on Sales Tax Measure for LA Transit?

    Measure M: Yes or No on Sales Tax Measure for LA Transit?

    This November, among the many referenda that Californians will vote on, Angelenos get to vote yes or no on whether to grant a permanent, 1/2-cent sales tax to support transit and transportation projects throughout southern California. Debate about Measure M has
    become pretty hot. The Mayor of Beverly Hills has called Measure M the “Forever Tax.” But previously passed Prop A and C are permanent, and those found support among LA County voters. Measure M pushes the sales taxes in LA County upwards of 10 percent, and in a region with high housing and cost of living, and relatively low wage growth, that increase is sure to be felt. Nonetheless, the measure boasts some impressive endorsements, from the LA Times and myriad urban advocacy organizations like the LA Bike Coalition.

    How should you vote?

    Join us for our panel discussion of the Measure’s pros and cons moderated by Dr. Lisa Schweitzer, Associate Professor in the USC Price School. With us will be Laura Nelson of the LA Times, Stephanie Wiggins, Deputy Chief Executive Office of LA Metro, and Damien Goodman, Executive Director of Crenshaw Subway Coalition and Lead Organizer of No on Measure M, Dr. Jeffrey Sellers, Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at USC, and Dr. Mark Phillips, Assistant Professor of economics and tax policy at USC.

    • 1 hr 20 min
    • video
    Supply Chain Consolidation and Cooperation in the Agricultural Industry

    Supply Chain Consolidation and Cooperation in the Agricultural Industry

    This talk evaluates the California cut flower industry's current transportation practices and investigates the feasibility and cost of establishing a shipping consolidation center in Oxnard, California. The problem is formulated using a Mixed-Integer programming model. The model estimates a 34.8% shipping cost decrease, $20M, if all California farms participated in the consolidation center. Our analysis of estimated cut-flower trade flows originating from Miami shows that the magnitudes of these flows are relatively sensitive to shipping cost, controlling for market size.

    Maged Dessouky
    Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering
    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Wentao Zhang
    Ph. D. Candidate, Industrial Systems and Engineering
    USC Viterbi School of Engineering

    Maged M. Dessouky is a Professor in the Daniel. J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California and the Director of the Epstein Institute. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from Purdue University and a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He is area/associate editor the Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, IIE Transactions and Computers and Industrial Engineering, on the editorial board of Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, and previously served as area editor/associate of ACM Transactions of Modeling and Computer Simulation and IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems. He is a Fellow of IIE and was awarded the 2007 Transportation Science and Logistics Best Paper Prize.

    • 58 min
    • video
    I Want It Now: E-Commerce, Supply Chains and Transportation

    I Want It Now: E-Commerce, Supply Chains and Transportation

    "I Want It Now: E-Commerce, Supply Chains and Transportation" - Featuring Benjamin D. Conwell, Senior Managing Director, Cushman & Wakefield

    The explosion of eCommerce is driving drastically changed customer expectations globally which, in turn, is causing some of the most significant disruption in retail, transportation and international trade we’ve seen in the last fifty years. Amazon’s dominance and pace of innovation increasingly demand players aspiring to succeed in the new world order constantly reinvent the way they operate. Players in this space have little choice. And little time.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    • video
    Agglomerations in Los Angeles

    Agglomerations in Los Angeles

    Cities are the engines of economic growth because they provide opportunities for enhanced productivity. They provide opportunities for productive spatial arrangements, often involving “clustering” and “agglomerating.” But these widely cited descriptors are seldom defined. This research uses business location data for Los Angeles County to test various associated questions. (1) To what extent do technological links explain spatial clustering? (2) How does this vary by industry? (3) Are the smallest firms attracted to the densest areas because they are most dependent on information developed by others? (4) How does this vary by industry? This research investigates these questions at the sub-metropolitan (traffic analysis zone) level.

    Speakers:
    Peter Gordon
    Emeritus Professor, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy

    John Cho
    Associate Regional Planner, Southern California Association of Governments

    Peter Gordon, Ph.D.,is an Emeritus Professor of the Price School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California. He retired in 2013 after 43 years at USC. He now teaches each summer at Zhejian University in Hangzhou, China. Gordon’s interests are in urban economics and urban transportation economics. He is a Fellow of the Regional Science Association International, a past president of the Western Regional Science Association and received the Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971.

    John Cho, Ph.D., is Associate Regional Planner at SCAG. His research interests include topics in freight transportation, land use and transportation policy, and regional economics. He received a Ph.D. in industrial and Systems Engineering, and a Master of Science in Civil Engineering specialized in Transportation Engineering from USC, and an M.A. in Economics from Seoul National University.

    • 1 hr
    • video
    Have App Will Travel: Comparing the Price & Speed of Fifty CTA & UberPool Trips in Chicago

    Have App Will Travel: Comparing the Price & Speed of Fifty CTA & UberPool Trips in Chicago

    New “carpooling” services, such as LyftLine and UberPool, offers consumers lower prices than conventional ridesourcing service in exchange for extra stops to pick up and drop off other passengers. This presentation explores the competitive implications of this new mobility option for public transit. Professor Schwieterman shares results from his controlled experiment in which data collectors made 50 one-way trips between various urban locations to measure the differing costs, time, and conveniences associated with UberPool and Chicago Transit Authority service, an approach that controls for a wide variety of others factors, such as time of day, weather, and traffic conditions. The results show that saving from carpooling for commuter traveling downtown jobs in small, but the $5 - $6 additional cost to carpool is an attractive “value proposition” for many travelers who have historically used transit on neighborhood-neighborhood trips.

    Speaker:
    Joseph Schwieterman
    Director, Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development
    Professor, DePaul University

    Joseph Schwieterman is professor at DePaul University in Chicago and Director of the school’s Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development. A noted authority on passenger travel, he has twice testified on transportation issues before subcommittees of the U.S. Congress. Schwieterman is the primary author of an annual year-in- review of the intercity bus industry and currently researching how local policies affect “shared use” modes such as carsharing and ridersharing. Schwieterman holds a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Chicago.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    • video
    Cities and Economic Growth: Emergent Spatial Organization (ESO)

    Cities and Economic Growth: Emergent Spatial Organization (ESO)

    Peter Gordon, Ph.D., an Emeritus Professor of the Price School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California gives his presentation on “Cities and Economics Growth” to students, faculty, and practitioners. This presentation is a part of the Spring 2016 METRANS Research Seminar program, an ongoing series of presentations designed to share cutting-edge transportation research with interested parties throughout the industry.

    • 1 hr 2 min

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