28 episodes

In this course, Dr. Nash explores the relationship between Modern and Post-Modern philosophy. This is done through an examination of the thought of key philosophers, such as Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Soren Kierkegaard, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Nietzsche, and an exploration of the major movements in this period, including Naturalism, Romanticism, Nihilism, Existentialism, and Process Theology. In addition, Dr. Nash offers a critical analysis of the early 20th century liberal Protestant movement and the Evangelical response, particularly that of J. Gresham Machen.

Modern Philosophy Reformed Theological Seminary

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 2.5, 122 Ratings

In this course, Dr. Nash explores the relationship between Modern and Post-Modern philosophy. This is done through an examination of the thought of key philosophers, such as Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Soren Kierkegaard, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Nietzsche, and an exploration of the major movements in this period, including Naturalism, Romanticism, Nihilism, Existentialism, and Process Theology. In addition, Dr. Nash offers a critical analysis of the early 20th century liberal Protestant movement and the Evangelical response, particularly that of J. Gresham Machen.

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5
122 Ratings

122 Ratings

Darth Brosephus ,

Here and There

Contrary to some of the overly negative and overly positive reviews here, this is an average podcast; it’s not really even a podcast at all. This is a series of course lectures from Reformed Theological Seminary by the late Dr. Ronald Nash. He is very dissatisfied with the tone and form of modern philosophy from Kant onwards; and he is very conservative. This dissatisfaction is animated all the more during his lectures by his harsh demeanor and overly critical style of teaching. If you struggle to listen to someone that thinks differently than you and does not make any effort to hide it, this will not be an easy series for you. Personally, I find the professors tone to be very harsh and unpleasant at times. I have had the pleasure of being in the classroom with professors who passionately disagree with certain philosophical positions, but do so in the spirit of peer-hood. Nonetheless, I have engaged with his works of scholarship throughout writing projects in the past and will confess his brilliance; which shines at many times throughout this series. Even still, the lectures [here] are constantly bombarded by his own position and opinion, but that’s not to say that there aren't large spans of good scholarship in this series; which is what I came looking for initially, and is upon which I have judged this series. I personally recommend the episodes on Hegel and Kierkegaard for those interested. Again, even in those lectures dealing with Hegel and Kierkegaard, expect the ad hominem.

Consoiracy Jim ,

These Unbelievers Live in a Vacuum

It’s sad to read the unbelievers’ reviews. They don’t seem to understand why the professor is so “one-sided” and “biased.” His purpose is not to simply introduce students to the philosophers’ ideas (as would be the case in a secular school), but to aquatint future Christian ministry leaders with the ideas that have influenced Western thought, and how they relate to Christianity. So, of course the professor would ridicule and criticize many of the philosophers’ ideas; they need to be shown for the nonsense and garbage they often are.

Non-Christian philosophy since the so-called enlightenment is mostly nonsense masquerading as rational thought. Almost every system fails, and the ones that don’t usually rely on assumptions derived from those that do fail.

I’m a university student at this time. I’ve been into philosophy for several years. I go to a public university. Most of my course material is extremely biased against religion, and most of my professors use their classes as soapboxes for spreading their anti-Christian ideas. They make us read some of the dumbest “philosophers” that have ever lived.

These other reviewers don’t seem to understand what’s really going on in the world.

Beruit ,

Has anyone looked at the genre this is under?

This is a christian, giving lectures to a Reformed Theological Seminary. If opinion equates to propoganda on the merit of it being a different opinion than yours, then what is the point of thinking at all? If you listened to an atheist lecture on John Calvin at Oxford, I have no doubt you would find the same "polemics" at play. This professor is speaking to students who hold to the same belief system as he does, so he is not going to softball any of these issues for the ghost of an outside opinion in the room. You do not have to accept this teaching as true, no system of belief should expect this if it is being taught from a classroom, however you do need to respect it as actual teaching.

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