136 episodes

Money on the Left is a monthly, interdisciplinary podcast that reclaims money’s public powers for intersectional politics. Hosting critical conversations with leading historians, theorists, organizers, and activists, the show draws upon Modern Monetary Theory and constitutional approaches to money to advance new forms of left critique and practice. Money on the Left is the official podcast of the Modern Money Network’s Humanities Division. It is hosted by William Saas, Maxximilian Seijo and Scott Ferguson and presented in partnership with Monthly Review magazine. Follow us on Twitter & Facebook at @moneyontheleft.

Money on the Left Money on the Left

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.6 • 56 Ratings

Money on the Left is a monthly, interdisciplinary podcast that reclaims money’s public powers for intersectional politics. Hosting critical conversations with leading historians, theorists, organizers, and activists, the show draws upon Modern Monetary Theory and constitutional approaches to money to advance new forms of left critique and practice. Money on the Left is the official podcast of the Modern Money Network’s Humanities Division. It is hosted by William Saas, Maxximilian Seijo and Scott Ferguson and presented in partnership with Monthly Review magazine. Follow us on Twitter & Facebook at @moneyontheleft.

    Projections 2: The Calls Are From Inside the House

    Projections 2: The Calls Are From Inside the House

    Reflecting on recent protests outside of Brett Kavanaugh's home as well as a recent news story where police invaded the home of a 16 year old trans twitch streamer, Will Beaman (@agoingaccount) notes ways in which conservative narratives around household and parental identity are unstable and contested.

    • 16 min
    Focus on the Family Values (ft. Erica Robles-Anderson, @fstflofscholars)

    Focus on the Family Values (ft. Erica Robles-Anderson, @fstflofscholars)

    In this special episode of Superstructure, Cohost Natalie Tabb Smith (@orangeasm) is joined by Erica Robles-Anderson (@fstflofscholars) and Scott Ferguson (@videotroph) to discuss common interests between the Money on the Left Editorial Collective and the Oikos working group on kinship/economy. Naty, Erica and Scott reflect on households, financial forms, and reproductive politics in our contemporary political economy through the prism of Melinda Cooper’s 2017 text, Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism.

    • 1 hr 19 min
    Medium Femme - 6 - Pleasure on the Left (Part 2)

    Medium Femme - 6 - Pleasure on the Left (Part 2)

    Continuing their consideration of pleasure for a world of leftist struggle, co-hosts Charlotte Tavan (@moltopopulare) and Natalie Tabb Smith (@orangeasm) turn to a recently published Superstructure article co-authored by Erica Robles-Anderson and Scott Ferguson. Titled "The Visual Cliff: Eleanor Gibson and the Origins of Affordance," the essay critically locates the hidden history of contemporary user-experience design in a well-known psychological experiment. Conducted by Dr. Eleanor Gibson, the experiment placed babies alone atop a visual precipice in order to test their depth perception. Following the essay, Charlotte and Naty question the notion that we must remain frozen forever between false binaries, like babies staring over an impossible visual cliff. Doing so, their discussion weaves through thinkers as diverse as Lynne Segal, Adrienne Maree Brown, Lisa Duggan, Gayle Rubin, and more.

    • 1 hr 31 min
    Projections 1: Up for Grabs

    Projections 1: Up for Grabs

    In this first episode of Projections, Will Beaman (@agoingaccount) reflects on some recent comments from US Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va) suggesting Democrats should prioritize inflation over Roe v. Wade in their campaign messaging in the midterms.

    Music: “Lilac” from “This Would Be Funny If It Were Happening To Anyone But Me” EP by flirting.
    http://flirtingfullstop.bandcamp.com
    Twitter: @actualflirting

    • 12 min
    Medium Femme - 5 - Pleasure on the Left (Part 1)

    Medium Femme - 5 - Pleasure on the Left (Part 1)

    Co-hosts Charlotte Tavan (@moltopopulare) and Natalie Tabb Smith (@orangeasm) discuss conceptualizations of pleasure on the left, looking at a recent article arguing against the radicalism of polyamory in Novara for part 1 of this installment of Medium Femme.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Place-Based Narrative Labor with Sonia Ivancic

    Place-Based Narrative Labor with Sonia Ivancic

    Money on the Left speaks with Dr. Sonia Ivancic about the importance of regionally sensitive and affirmative storytelling in provisioning processes. Assistant Professor in organizational communication at University of South Florida, Dr. Ivancic is a community-engaged researcher, whose work on “place-based narrative labor” offers essential new tools for displacing prevailing scarcity logics and rhetorics of austerity with more capacious ways of thinking, arguing, and narrating. 
    Through embedded fieldwork with non-profit, rural Appalachian food distributors, Professor Ivancic has developed astute critiques of the narrative frames used by some grant-making non-profits as they paradoxically seek to address privation and hunger in Appalachia by perpetually framing privation and hunger in Appalachia as the region’s most salient and seemingly default characteristics. In place of this “deficit-driven” characterization–which, owing to the ways that such projects depend on the grant cycle, is nearly always the dominant kind of characterization–Dr. Ivancic identifies and promotes an “asset-driven” mode of place-based narrative labor. With this asset-based approach, the provisioning process affirmatively calls attention to and works to expand the capacities and potentials of a given community, honoring the dignity of particular communities, while opening political imaginaries to include new metrics for collective flourishing and renewal. 
    In our conversation, we extend Ivancic’s theorization of asset-driven place-based narrative labor to rethink the challenges and potentials of a Federal Job Guarantee under a future Green New Deal. We also draw rich parallels between her account of narrativity in local provisioning and conceptions of macro political economy in Modern Monetary Theory and other heterodox traditions in political economy. 
    Visit our Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/MoLsuperstructure
    Music by Nahneen Kula: www.nahneenkula.com

    • 1 hr 16 min

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5
56 Ratings

56 Ratings

inanekev ,

Trying to follow

Some bits are quite cool but after listening to 4 episodes I still mostly don’t know what the hosts are talking about. Just when I think I’m starting to grasp it, there’s a digression into Hegel jokes that I don’t follow... I wanted to get a handle on how Left MMT works and thinks, but I’m not really grasping more than the outlines of its critique of Marxism. Everything else is conveyed in a difficult mixture of grad school lingo, high context humor, and What’s New in Vulgar Marxist Media. Going to keep listening but it would be helpful if there was a bit more focus in the non-interview episodes. When there isn’t a guest to interrogate, i feel like I’m outside the podcast trying to overhear what’s happening. I keep seeing this podcast described as an urgent project and so I’m trying to keep up, but I feel like I’m missing out on something. At the very least, it would be great if there was like a background prerequisite reading list for engaging with the podcast!

J.P. McD ,

A Cherished Hate-Listen

Worst podcast I’ve ever listened to, but it does bring me back once in a while for my Ninety Minutes of Hate. Despite hating most other people on the left and most movies (because the Jedi don’t use MMT or whatever), they bizarrely seem to adore the awful Disney+ Marvel shows. It’s been a few months so I wonder if that host who laughs obnoxiously at everything she says is still on…

D@DC ,

In-group hot air

Of the two male hosts, one rambles so much by the time he gets to his point it’s hard to figure out the point he was trying to make. The female host insists on making a joke about every second or third sentence uttered by others and seems to find herself very funny. The other male host seems to have interesting ideas or arguments to present but the relentless interruptions, in-jokes, and immaturity of his two companions gets in his way. Overall it feels like listening in on three grad students riffing on and making jokes about their chosen discipline. When they started “Superstructure” I had high hopes but in the end it’s just been eavesdropping on three acquaintances talking to themselves instead of three people presenting ideas, arguments and analysis to others not already in their in-group.

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