14 episodes

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MoneyWise is a daily radio ministry of MoneyWise Media. Hosted by Rob West and Steve Moore, the program offers a practical, biblical and good-natured approach to managing your time, talents and resources.

MoneyWise Rob West & Steve Moore

    • Christianity
    • 4.9 • 48 Ratings

To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085

MoneyWise is a daily radio ministry of MoneyWise Media. Hosted by Rob West and Steve Moore, the program offers a practical, biblical and good-natured approach to managing your time, talents and resources.

    Secret Consumer Scores

    Secret Consumer Scores

    To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    We all know that our FICO score has a huge impact on our finances, but did you know another number could be just as important and you may not even know about it? It’s called your Secret Consumer Score and most of us don’t even know we have one. Today, host Rob West and Steve Moore explain this little-known measurement and the affect it can have on your money.

    These consumer scores can impact other things, not just our buying decisions. Another name for this is, Secret Surveillance Scores.

    There are several companies doing the surveilling, including Sift, Zeta Global, and Retail Equation. They compile huge amounts of data on you and from that they determine your secret consumer score, which they then sell to those who want information on your buying habits.

    Sift specializes in protecting companies against fraud, and they concentrate more on transactions than people. Zeta Global rates your value as a customer, and retailers use that data to determine what services they’ll offer you and how they’ll treat you as a customer. Retail Equation tries to identify customers committing fraud. Big retailers use it to determine whether they’ll allow you to return a purchased item.

    Your secret consumer score could be used to determine the offers you receive, maybe even the prices you see when shopping online. Some landlords use it to determine whether you’re likely to pay rent on time and how much you can afford in the way of future rent increases.

    Make sure you shop around before making a major online purchase and be wary of ads you see while doing it, because they’re not likely to be the best deals out there.

    Try using a privacy window in your browser so your shopping can’t be tracked. That way, the offers you see may not be based on your secret consumer score.

    Adjust your privacy settings for your smartphone to prevent background data from being shared.

    Here are a couple of questions we answered from our callers on today’s program:

    I have $17,000 of revolving credit card debt. Should I take out a home equity loan and get it paid off? (Rob mentions ChristianCreditCounselors.org).

    I want to make sure that I’m investing in the right ways, and I want to get the right financial advisor for me. What would you recommend I do? (Rob mentions InspireInvesting.com and InvestEventide.com).


    Ask your questions at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, purchase books, and even download free, helpful resources like the MoneyWise app.

    Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it’s your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking the Donate tab at the top of the page.

    Faith in God’s Provision

    Faith in God’s Provision

    To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    The Bible is, among other things, a book of promises. One of the most repeated promises is that the Lord will provide. 2020 as a year tested many of us, but we took comfort in knowing that God is in control and is always faithful. Today, host Rob West and Steve Moore talk about finding peace and contentment in the new year.

    God provides not only for our financial needs by giving us the ability to earn a living, but for many other needs as well.

    In Genesis 22;14, Abraham used the Hebrew name Jehovah Jireh which translates as The Lord will provide.

    If you’re deeply fearful that God won’t keep His promise to provide, there’s a good chance that what you really fear is that He won’t provide in the way you want him to. God promises to provide for our needs, not our wants.

    When we obey God, we’re seeking His Kingdom and becoming more like Christ who was obedient unto death.

    We must acknowledge that God owns everything and that we’re only stewards of what he gives us.

    Philippians 4 says, Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

    Here are a couple of questions we answered from our callers on today’s program:

    I have credit karma. I checked my credit score and it’s only at about 686. I currently don’t have any open credit cards or anything like that. Should I take out a credit card in order to build my credit? (Rob mentions going to AnnualCreditReport.com)

    I have been carrying $30,000 of debt for years and I want to lift that burden. What would be the best way to pay off that debt?


    Ask your questions at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, purchase books, and even download free, helpful resources like the MoneyWise app.

    Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it’s your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking the Donate tab at the top of the page.

    Lessons From The Widow’s Oil

    Lessons From The Widow’s Oil

    To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    The story of The Widow’s Oil in 2 Kings 4 is a wonderful example of God providing for the faithful in miraculous ways. But what lessons does it hold for us?What can we glean from those seven verses that apply to our lives and our faith that God will provide? They are many, in fact, and today, Kingdom Advisors President Rob West reveals several of them. Then it’s your calls at 800-525-7000.
    Rob and Steve start with the first verse in 2 Kings 4, Now the wife of one of the sons of the prophets cried to Elisha, Your servant my husband is dead, and you know that your servant feared the Lord, but the creditor has come to take my two children to be his slaves.’
    First, the widow’s husband had been faithful and was deserving of God’s provision. But also, the creditor is acting against Jewish law by abusing a widow and orphans, and further, by threatening to enslave fellow Jews, which was also illegal.
    Verse two reads, And Elisha said to her, What shall I do for you? Tell me; what have you in the house?’ And she said, Your servant has nothing in the house except a jar of oil.’
    Here is a lesson that we have a part to play in God’s provision. He expects us to use what we have, even if it’s only one jar of oil. God will often use what we already have to provide in ways we can’t imagine.
    Zechariah 4:10,Do not despise these small beginnings, for the Lord rejoices to see the work begin.
    Sometimes we don’t expect God to provide because we lack confidence in the resources he’s already given us. But when we fully grasp that God owns everything and that His resources are unlimited our faith in His provision will grow and so will our gratitude for what He's given us already.
    Verses three and four, Then he said, Go outside, borrow vessels from all your neighbors, empty vessels and not too few. Then go in and shut the door behind yourself and your sons and pour into all these vessels. And when one is full, set it aside.’
    First, the widow was obedient. She did exactly what Elisha, as God’s representative, told her to do. We mustalso be obedient as we expect God’s provision. That means following His financial principles found throughout the Bible.
    Second, the widow didn’t rely on her own resources. She went to her neighbors and asked for help by providing additional containers for the oil. It’s not always easy to ask others for help when we need it, and we can’t let our pride stand in the way.
    And finally, God will put people in your life who want to help you, if you ask, if the need is real and you ask with humility. That won’t always be with money. It could be other resources, or maybe important information or advice that will help you turn things around. So again, don’t go it alone.

    Here are a couple of questions we answered from our callers on today’s program:

    We have a mortgage that we modified in 2012. Should we refinance it or remodify it again?
    I bought a townhome and right after we moved in, I started getting letters about additional insurance. I am raising two grandchildren and the only debt I have is on this townhome. Advice?
    I have been saving coins for a long time. I have a lot of different types of quarters. I know about the coin shortage. Should I cash these in?
    I would like to donate my required distribution to a charity. Do I have to pay taxes on this?
    I have a savings bond that I would like to transfer to my godson. Is this wise?
    I am 41 years old. I recently paid my house off. I have a little money in stocks and a little in savings. What is the best way to save for retirement?


    Ask your questions at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, purchase books, and even download free, helpful resources like the Mon

    Fun Facts About Money

    Fun Facts About Money

    To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    Money is something we all need and use. But do you ever think about all the things you don’t know about the money in your pocket? Today, host Rob West and Steve Moore talk about the background of our currency and other fun facts about the money we use.

    The pyramid on the back of the $1 bill is actually part of the U.S. official seal, supposed to represent permanency, and not part of some Illuminati conspiracy.

    The Secret Service was first organized to hunt down counterfeiters. It wasn’t until the assassination of William McKinley in 1901 that Congress asked the Secret Service to also protect the president.

    MoreMonopolymoney is printed each year than actual currency.

    The average lifespan of a dollar bill is only 22 months.

    500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 dollar notes were printed until 1969 when they were discontinued for lack of use.

    The Bible contains over 2300 verses relating to money or possessions, more than any other topic.

    Here are a couple of questions we answered from our callers on today’s program:

    I had a term life insurance for over 30 years and it just expired in September. What should I do next in terms of insurance?

    What are your feelings on churches that require their staff to tithe and give offerings?


    Ask your questions at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, purchase books, and even download free, helpful resources like the MoneyWise app.

    Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it’s your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking the Donate tab at the top of the page.

    How To Spot a Great Contractor

    How To Spot a Great Contractor

    To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    Here’s a question for you, how many contractors does it take to screw in a light bulb? I’ll let you know, when one of them, calls me back. All kidding aside, in a profession where reputation is everything most contractors want to do a good job for you. Today, Kingdom Advisors President Rob West has some questions to ask before hiring one. Then we take your calls at 800-525-7000.

    The first thing would be to ask for a list of recent references, two or three should do it. If you get positive feedback from folks who’ve hired the individual within the last few months, you can be confident about the answers to all of the questions.
    How long will it take you to complete the work? You want to get an idea of where you land on their list of priorities. Most contractors have more than one customer at a time, that’s the nature of the business. A great contractor will give you a realistic timetable for getting the job done.
    Who do you work for? Now, hopefully a Christian contractor would say, I work for God. But at the very least you want a contractor who says, I work for you, of course. At any rate, the answer will tell you a lot about the individual.
    How much experience do you have doing this particular job?
    Are you licensed and bonded? Of course, the answer has to be yes, and you’ll want to see proof of that.
    Will you give me a detailed estimate? You want the individual to explain every item in the estimate and why it’s needed.
    How important are the details to you? For example, how does that new hardwood floor transition to the carpet in the hallway? Is it the same height? If not, how will you account for that?
    Will I be able to live here while the work is done?
    Who’s responsible for the clean up? Where will the workers take their lunch break? Do you expect bathroom privileges? You want to work out those details with your contractor up front, and a great one will be happy to comply with your wishes.
    What payment will you need to start the work? A great contractor won’t need all of the money up front, but it’s not unusual for a contractor to ask for some payment before beginning the work.

    Here are a couple of questions we answered from our callers on today’s program:

    My husband and I recently sold our home and have about 350K in cash. We are living in our cabin for the time being. We have the money in Capital One. Is this wise?
    I received a request from AAA offering me an insurance policy for accidental insurance. It doesn’t seem too expensive. Is this a wise idea?
    I have a child that is a senior in an expensive college. I am financially responsible for him, because his father and I are divorced. I have cosigned for him. I have looked into taking out a life insurance policy for him. Is this wise?
    I have always had a term life insurance policy. It won’t change until I am 70 years old. Should I just keep doing this until age 70?


    Ask your questions at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, purchase books, and even download free, helpful resources like the MoneyWise app.
    Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it’s your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking the Donate tab at the top of the page.

    Debt Collection Rule Changes

    Debt Collection Rule Changes

    To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    If you’re behind on your bills the last thing you want is to see a collection notice in the mail or get a call from a collector, but now they have even more ways to ruin your day.Recent rule changes now allow collection agencies to text and email you. And the new regs have consumer rights groups riled up. Financial planner and teacher Rob West has the details, then we take your calls and questions at 800-525-7000.

    Proverbs 3:27 says,Do not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to do it. So as believers, we must always pay our debts, if not immediately, as soon as we can.

    Debt collectors have a long history of harassing people for payment with constant phone calls and bogus threats about legal and even criminal action if they don’t pay. So, rules were put in place to prevent that type of harassment.

    Those restrictions were put in place in 1977, when email and texting were only science fiction. So, for over a year, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has been grappling with how to incorporate modern communication into the regs that govern collection agencies.

    The CFPB has simply decided to allow collectors to use, not just email and texting, but also social media and voice messaging even though a recent survey showed that 70-percent of Americans are against it.

    The CFPB’s position is that by providing collectors with these new means to contact people, it will reduce the number of phone calls and snail mail messages they receive

    Collection agencies by definition are third parties. That means your creditor sold your debt to an outside entity and that agency has the right to contact you for payment.

    But with these rule changes, a person could get emails with links from unknown third parties that might be legitimate and might not be. Unfamiliar emails with links are often phishing attempts that could download malware to your computer.

    And the FCC is now warning people about smishing attempts. These are harmful links in text messages. So there’s a lot to be concerned about with these new rules.

    There is one bright spot in the new regs. The language specifically gives you the right to opt out of receiving those types of messages. But you have to make your request in writing, by snail mail, which is somewhat ironic.

    And a collection agency must provide you with simple instructions for opting out of receiving any more emails or text messages.

    Collectors are legally required to give you their name, the name of the original creditor, the amount owed, and to provide verification if you dispute the claim.

    Here are a couple of questions we answered from our callers on today’s program:



    I sold my primary residence. I have a duplex that is on a line of credit. I owe about 200K on it. Should I use the money to pay off the line of credit, or make improvements on it?

    How can I build up my short-term savings quickly?

    I am 50 years old and I can’t work. I have two high school boys. Do I need to save like I am in retirement or saving for retirement?

    I just retired from the military. I have a TSP and I don’t need the money now. I can manage my TSP myself, but should I pay 1% to an investor and let them do it for me?



    Ask your questions at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, purchase books, and even download free, helpful resources like the MoneyWise app.

    Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it’s your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking the Donate tab at the top of the page.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

BarleyOtis ,

Best money advice show on radio

Rob and Steve give the best holistic advice that’s available. All their advice is based on Biblical wisdom that transcends time, economic cycles, and culture.

Jodylleigh ,

Christian finance advice at it's best!

I love this show and listen to it daily on the radio. I am so thankful that there is a podcast for when I miss an episode!

ERBJR ,

MR

I've applied a lot of the ideas that I've gleaned from these podcasts and am very pleased with the results!

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