202 episodes

News and inspiration from nature’s frontline, featuring inspiring guests and deeper analysis of the global environmental issues explored every day by the Mongabay.com team, from climate change to biodiversity, tropical ecology, wildlife, and more. The show airs every other week.

Mongabay Newscast Mongabay Podcasts

    • Science
    • 4.9 • 34 Ratings

News and inspiration from nature’s frontline, featuring inspiring guests and deeper analysis of the global environmental issues explored every day by the Mongabay.com team, from climate change to biodiversity, tropical ecology, wildlife, and more. The show airs every other week.

    ‘Destructive & flawed’: Bottom trawling’s many impacts and the activism that's slowing the damage

    ‘Destructive & flawed’: Bottom trawling’s many impacts and the activism that's slowing the damage

    In a historic move, The European Commission recently announced the protection of an area half the size of Belgium in the North Atlantic from bottom trawling, a fishing practice widely known as being the most destructive, particularly for deep-sea biodiversity and delicate marine ecosystems, such as cold water corals upon which other marine life (and humans) depend.
    Activist and Goldman Environmental Prize winner, Claire Nouvian, joins the Mongabay Newscast to talk about this and her organization’s 7-year journey that led to a French ban on bottom trawling, and a later EU-wide ban.
    She discusses not just the importance of deep-sea marine life but the effectiveness of grassroots activism and how consumers can avoid bottom trawling and support legislation to ban the fishing gear. 
    Related reading:
    Europe moves to protect deep-sea sites in Atlantic from bottom fishing Scientists map the impact of trawling using satellite vessel tracking Episode Artwork: A deep-sea coral, Paragorgia johnsoni, with a large, brisingid sea star on its base, pictured in the New England Seamount chain. Image © The Mountains-in the Sea Research Team, IFE, URI-IAO, and NOAA.
    Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips.
    If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps!
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Please share your thoughts and feedback! submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 37 min
    Mongabay Reports: Agroforestry is climate-positive and profitable, investors say

    Mongabay Reports: Agroforestry is climate-positive and profitable, investors say

    What's a climate-friendly and profitable way to farm? Some investors (and many farmers) say it's agroforestry, which combines trees & shrubs with annual crops for mutual benefits: shade-grown coffee or bird-friendly chocolate, for instance.
    So why have the agriculture sectors of the U.S. and E.U. largely ignored it? That's a question Ethan Steinberg and his partners at Propagate Ventures sought to answer, and then raised $1.5 million in seed funding to help farmers in eight U.S. states transition from conventional agriculture to agroforestry. 
    Hear more about this growing trend in sustainable agriculture by listening to this audio reading of the popular article Investors say agroforestry isn’t just climate friendly — it’s also profitable by Stephanie Hanes on this latest episode of Mongabay Reports.
    Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips.
    If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps!
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Photo Credit: A model rubber agroforestry forest garden, incorporating animal husbandry (silvopasture). Illustration courtesy of Kittitornkool, J. et al (2019).
    Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

    • 12 min
    Could Brazil's election decide the fate of the Amazon?

    Could Brazil's election decide the fate of the Amazon?

    Tropical forest news is coming fast lately, and we've got a top expert to discuss it with, beginning with the deforestation rate of the Brazilian Amazon in 2022 which is on pace to match the dismal heights of 2021; however, the upcoming Brazilian presidential election between incumbent Jair Bolsonaro and former president Luis Inacío Lula da Silva (Lula) could change forest conservation prospects.
    Mongabay's CEO and sought after tropical forest news commentator, Rhett Butler, joins the Mongabay Newscast to share his analysis of how former president Lula could (once again) significantly decrease deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, like he's done in the past.
    Rhett also shares his insight into a historic legislative move by the European Parliament to block 14 commodities linked to deforestation from entering the EU. The bill places the onus on the buyer to prove any 'dirty commodities' entering the EU are not linked to deforestation, whether legal or illegal. Rhett also discusses the renewed REDD+ agreement between Indonesia and Norway, which was canceled in 2021 when Norway failed to issue payment. 
    Related reading from Mongabay: 
    Brazil faces two contrasting legacies for the Amazon in October’s elections Amazon deforestation on pace to roughly match last year’s rate of loss Amazon deforestation in Brazil booms in August To hear our early 2022 conversation with Rhett, listen to Mongabay Newscast episode 136 here:
    Podcast: The 411 on forests and reforestation for 2022
    Episode artwork: Amazon rainforest canopy in Brazil. Image by Rhett Butler.
    Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips.
    If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps!
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Please share your thoughts and feedback! submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 27 min
    Mongabay Reports: Spies in the sky, albatrosses alert authorities to illegal fishing

    Mongabay Reports: Spies in the sky, albatrosses alert authorities to illegal fishing

    Can an albatross detect illegal fishing vessels? Findings from published research say yes: over the course of six-months, 169 albatrosses fitted with radar-detecting trackers covered 47 million square kilometers of the southern Indian Ocean found radar signals from 353 ships.
    Many of these vessels had no AIS signal, which is an indicator that a ship has switched it off in an attempt to remain hidden, but little did they know that the albatrosses revealed them.
    Science journalist Shreya Dasgupta reported on the study for Mongabay in 2020, here:
    Any illegal fishing going on around here? Ask an albatross
    Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips.
    If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps!
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Episode Artwork: A wandering albatross chick on its nest on Possession Island in the Crozet archipelago of the southern Indian Ocean. The species is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. Image by Alain Ricci via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).
    Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

    • 7 min
    Hope for Sumatran elephants may hinge on their 'personhood'

    Hope for Sumatran elephants may hinge on their 'personhood'

    There's less than 10 years remaining to save Sumatran elephants, says guest Leif Cocks, founder of the International Elephant Project, so we followed up with him to learn what is being done to save the critically endangered species' shrinking habitats, and to discuss the growing movement to recognize their 'personhood' and thereby ensure their interests are considered in development decisions.
    Leif also shares his thoughts on a planned hydropower dam in North Sumatra, sited in the only habitat where the last, critically endangered Tapanuli orangutans live. This project has also, tragically, claimed the lives of 16 workers in less than 2 years. 
    Related Reading via Mongabay:
    ‘Chased from every side’: Sumatran elephants pinned down by forest loss Photos: Meet the Indonesians on the front lines of human-elephant conflict in Sumatra ‘Cursed’ dam project in orangutan habitat claims 16th life in less than 2 years To hear our previous conversation with Leif on Sumatran elephants, see season 2, episode 6 of the Mongabay Explores podcast, here:
    Podcast: With just 10 years left to save Sumatran elephants, what can be done now?
    Episode artwork: Sumatran elephants play in water. Image by vincentraal via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).
    Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips.
    If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps!
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Please share your thoughts and feedback! submissions@mongabay.com.

    • 23 min
    Mongabay Reports: Chocolate frog, anyone?

    Mongabay Reports: Chocolate frog, anyone?

    Just kidding, you really shouldn't eat this.
    Last February, researchers described a new-to-science species of frog literally unearthed in the Peruvian Amazon during a rapid inventory of the lower Putamayo Basin. The image of the frog circulated on Twitter where it was likened to the chocolate frogs as seen in the Harry Potter film franchise. One user described the frog as a 'smooth lil fella.'
    The full scientific description of the tootsie-roll resembling amphibian is available here in the journal Evolutionary Systematics.
    This episode of Mongabay Reports, features the popular article Chocolate frog? New burrowing frog species unearthed in Amazon’s rare peatlands.
    Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips.
    If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps!
    See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay.
    Photo Credit: Synapturanus danta by Germán Chávez.

    Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

T Drinker ,

Environmental stories that deserve our attention

The interviews and background information provided with each podcast is a wonderful approach to highlighting important stories that often overlooked. Episode 44 about Mexico’s Ejidos community for instance. Great work!

riwri1 ,

Great topical podcast!

It’s great to find a podcast so focused on the topic of conservation, that goes in depth on issues. Covers a wide range of perspectives from many experts, with great journalistic integrity.

CrowsKnow ,

Great Reporting!

Mongabay is my go-to source for conservation news. I enjoy the updates on global issues as well as interesting interviews with biologists, researchers and activists. Indigenous perspectives and experiences are highlighted and elevated. Thanks for this awesome work!

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