44 episodes

God has created women in His image to build his Kingdom and to have dominion. This podcast calls Christian women to step up to this responsibility, while encouraging men to fight shoulder to shoulder with us, bringing in all of God’s word to bear on every area of life.



Sadly, an area in which the church is still plagued with pagan thinking has to do with the role and capabilities of women as image-bearers and dominion-takers, and yet the Bible describes godly women as “terrible as an army with banners.”



This is not a “Christian Women’s podcast” that limits itself to the key “female” passages like Proverbs 31 and Titus 2, or homemaking tips. We will be applying ALL of scripture to all of life from the perspective of kingdom women.



The Monstrous Regiment features a roundtable of dominion women, from single women to grandmothers, seeking to honor Jesus Christ in applying God’s word fearlessly and faithfully in all callings and seasons of life, both inside and out of the home.

The Monstrous Regiment | Reconstructionist Radio Reformed Podcast Network Reconstructionist Radio

    • Christianity
    • 4.0, 8 Ratings

God has created women in His image to build his Kingdom and to have dominion. This podcast calls Christian women to step up to this responsibility, while encouraging men to fight shoulder to shoulder with us, bringing in all of God’s word to bear on every area of life.



Sadly, an area in which the church is still plagued with pagan thinking has to do with the role and capabilities of women as image-bearers and dominion-takers, and yet the Bible describes godly women as “terrible as an army with banners.”



This is not a “Christian Women’s podcast” that limits itself to the key “female” passages like Proverbs 31 and Titus 2, or homemaking tips. We will be applying ALL of scripture to all of life from the perspective of kingdom women.



The Monstrous Regiment features a roundtable of dominion women, from single women to grandmothers, seeking to honor Jesus Christ in applying God’s word fearlessly and faithfully in all callings and seasons of life, both inside and out of the home.

    How Should Christians Respond to Discussions of Racial Injustice?

    How Should Christians Respond to Discussions of Racial Injustice?

    How Should Christians Respond to Discussions of Racial Injustice?











































    Hosts







    The Monstrous Crew







































    Description



























    In today's episode, we had the privilege of sitting down with Shatoyia Bradley, a business owner, fashion designer, writer, editor, wife, and mother for a frank discussion about racism, her experience as a black woman in the church and in America, and loving our neighbors in the context of systemic injustice. 























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    Race and Black Theology Reading List: An Annotated Bibliography



























     

    Below is a list of books that I highly recommend. They aren’t listed in order of importance, however, “Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul by Eddie Glaude, would be a great start. 

    The typical set of caveats apply to this bibliography, like many others in its category, of course. Black thought is not a monolith; like any tradition, it is less a sustained echoing chorus, and more a long argument over time. Its diversity, breadth, and sophistication cannot be captured in a brief introductory bibliography like this one.

    The authors on this list have sustained disagreements with each other, and therefore it stands to reason that no reader will agree with the entirety of these texts. Yet we consider this list to be something of a bare minimum for serious discourse about the question of taking black experiences and contributions seriously in Christian theology and ethics.

    While it is unlikely that any treatment of the experiences of blacks in America will engage all of these sources, it is virtually unimaginable that any responsible treatment of those questions can proceed with reference to none of them. The education of several lifetimes can be accessed simply by consulting the bibliographies of the sources contained herein.

    The criteria for inclusion on this list are unsystematic and inexact, but we solicited suggestions from friends of Mere Orthodoxy for sources that are written by Christians, substantively address Christian involvement in black racial issues, or are of pressing significance that white Christians can overlook them only at great harm to the power of their own analysis and ignorance of the real issues. The commentary that follows each of these selections below is from these friends. We are grateful for and indebted to them for their suggestions. Omission of any important source from this list ought not necessarily be construed as a sleight against that source. We would be grateful for readers to suggest additional sources in the comments below.

    The Cambridge Companion to Black Theology

    An introductory handbook like this one is often an excellent place to start to understand the broad contours of a body of thought, and to find an accessible point for immersing oneself more fully in that tradition. The essays in this volume understand black theology as a global movement, not at all confined to the question of addressing racism in all of its varietie...

    Spiritual Warfare 101

    Spiritual Warfare 101

    Spiritual Warfare 101











































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    The Monstrous Crew







































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    The devil walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour, as the Bible says. But what does this mean for Christians today, and more to the point, what (if anything) can we do about it? Cover some of the basics of spiritual warfare with Suzannah Rowntree in today's episode!























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    Intro

    The devil walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour, as the Bible says. But what does this mean for Christians today, and more to the point, what (if anything) can we do about it? Welcome to the Monstrous Regiment podcast. Today I’d love to spend some time discussing the subject of spiritual warfare. 

    Now, by spiritual warfare, I mean specifically the practices of intercessory prayer and verbal rebuke of demonic powers, together with some theological groundwork, since those are the specific areas I’m qualified to comment on. On the more extreme end of demonic activity, topics such as possession and exorcisdim are beyond the scope of this episode. However, I do want to start today’s scussion with an important disclaimer. Spiritual warfare is not simply about confronting demons. Long before we get to that, spiritual warfare is about walking in the Holy Spirit and not giving any ground to the devil in the first place. This is a practical matter of our daily walk in the Lord. It means refusing to tolerate sin in our own lives. It means loving mercy and doing justice. It means having the law of God written on our hearts. It means shining a light on injustice and protecting the vulnerable. Long before we ever get to the point of rebuking demons, we need to be sure we’re walking in the light. Otherwise none of the things I’m about to say in this episode will help you.

    My interest in the area of spiritual warfare is not merely academic. As an author of historical fantasy fiction, I often find myself writing about the spiritual aspects of things that happened in real world history. I don’t pretend that my stories are strictly truthful, but when I retell history, I’m always trying to say something about what the deeper spiritual realities might have been. Along the way, I’ve learned some things about what the Bible says about spiritual warfare, and come to believe that large parts of the church by and large come to this subject with an attitude of unbiblical fear.

    For instance, CS Lewis in The Screwtape Letters warns us off paying too little attention to the devil, and in the next sentence warns us about paying too much. With all respect to Lewis, It’s sort of a damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don’t scenario, and I’ve never found this take to be tremendously helpful. I’ve also had people express their concern about my making the topic of spiritual warfare a study at all. Multiple people have told me cautionary tales about Christians whose interest in the spiritual world resulted in their living in constant fear...afraid of demons, subject to demonic attack,

    On Tribes, Ethics, and Enemies

    On Tribes, Ethics, and Enemies

    On Tribes, Ethics, and Enemies











































    Hosts







    The Monstrous Crew







































    Description

























    We know we've been on a bit of a hiatus. Y'all may have noticed that there's been a lot going on! Plus, we have all been busy working hard at our various callings. But we still have a lot to say, and you are not going to want to miss this one.

    Join Monstrous Host Elisabeth for a compelling discussion on tribalism: what it is, how it impacts Christian discourse and behavior, and what its implications in a "culture war". 





















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    A thrill of hope… the weary world rejoices, for yonder breaks a new and glorious morn. That, my friends, is a line from a Christmas hymn, celebrating the incarnation of Jesus Christ, our savior. On its surface, it sounds like a song of praise to the one true God, but when we sing it could we be accidentally worshiping pagan gods? I’m Kate Robinson, and you’re listening to the Monstrous Regiment.My friends, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. A time for warmth, generosity, worship, love, and raging battles in Christendom. When it comes to Christmas, there are two fronts on which these battles are usually fought: one the one hand, a host of conservative Christians triggered by greetings of underpaid Wal-Mart employees, are loudly demanding that the world “put the Christ back in Christmas”, and standing strong against the “Liberal war on Christmas”. In other circles, Christians are urging each other not to celebrate Christmas at all, citing its “pagan roots” and declaring Christmas trees to be idols lifted up to pagan gods.The second is the one we’ll be focusing on today.Interestingly, opposition to Christmas from both sides — from Christians because it’s too pagan, and from atheists because it’s too Christian — has been ongoing for literally centuries. Puritans in England and New England even banned its celebration for a period of time in the 18th century, resulting in widespread pro-Christmas riots that included rioters decorating doors with holly. That’s not important, I just think it’s interesting. If you’re going to have rioters at your door, it’s nice of them to leave it decorated (see Lords of Misrule: The Puritan War on Christmas). Exploring the Pagan Roots of ChristmasI first encountered the idea that Christians should abandon the celebration of Christmas and a shocking expose of its pagan origins in my early 20s. Being sincere in my desire to honor Christ, I was immediately alarmed. Had I been dishonoring him my whole life? What were the implications of that? Was my resistance to this revelation simply a selfish desire to indulge in worldly pleasantries? I’m sure a lot of people who adhere to the “Christmas is pagan” ideologies have experienced similar thoughts, especially the last. There can be a tendency in the journey to die to ourselves and put to death the flesh, to become afraid that anything we hope is not true, must in fact be true, and it must be our sinful nature resisting it. Of course our flesh does often resist the commands of the Lord,

    The Pagan Roots of Insisting Christmas Has Pagan Roots

    The Pagan Roots of Insisting Christmas Has Pagan Roots

    The Pagan Roots of Insisting Christmas Has Pagan Roots











































    Hosts







    The Monstrous Crew







































    Description







    Every year in Christian circles, there's an ongoing debate about whether Christians should celebrate the incarnation of Christ on December 25, and what that has to do with ancient pagan idolatry. Joint monstrous host Kate Robinson to take a closer look at the origins of the Christmas holiday, what scripture says about pagan worship, and the implications for us today.



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    Transcript







    A thrill of hope… the weary world rejoices, for yonder breaks a new and glorious morn. That, my friends, is a line from a Christmas hymn, celebrating the incarnation of Jesus Christ, our savior. On its surface, it sounds like a song of praise to the one true God, but when we sing it could we be accidentally worshiping pagan gods? I’m Kate Robinson, and you’re listening to the Monstrous Regiment.My friends, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. A time for warmth, generosity, worship, love, and raging battles in Christendom. When it comes to Christmas, there are two fronts on which these battles are usually fought: one the one hand, a host of conservative Christians triggered by greetings of underpaid Wal-Mart employees, are loudly demanding that the world “put the Christ back in Christmas”, and standing strong against the “Liberal war on Christmas”. In other circles, Christians are urging each other not to celebrate Christmas at all, citing its “pagan roots” and declaring Christmas trees to be idols lifted up to pagan gods.The second is the one we’ll be focusing on today.Interestingly, opposition to Christmas from both sides — from Christians because it’s too pagan, and from atheists because it’s too Christian — has been ongoing for literally centuries. Puritans in England and New England even banned its celebration for a period of time in the 18th century, resulting in widespread pro-Christmas riots that included rioters decorating doors with holly. That’s not important, I just think it’s interesting. If you’re going to have rioters at your door, it’s nice of them to leave it decorated (see Lords of Misrule: The Puritan War on Christmas). Exploring the Pagan Roots of ChristmasI first encountered the idea that Christians should abandon the celebration of Christmas and a shocking expose of its pagan origins in my early 20s. Being sincere in my desire to honor Christ, I was immediately alarmed. Had I been dishonoring him my whole life? What were the implications of that? Was my resistance to this revelation simply a selfish desire to indulge in worldly pleasantries? I’m sure a lot of people who adhere to the “Christmas is pagan” ideologies have experienced similar thoughts, especially the last. There can be a tendency in the journey to die to ourselves and put to death the flesh, to become afraid that anything we hope is not true, must in fact be true, and it must be our sinful nature resisting it. Of course our flesh does often resist the commands of the Lord, but it’s also true that the law of God is written on our hearts, and that a desire to sacrifice all the vain things that charm us most, when not guided by scripture,

    Is Toxic Masculinity Real?

    Is Toxic Masculinity Real?

    Is Toxic Masculinity Real?











































    Hosts







    The Monstrous Crew







































    Description







    Today we’ll be defining toxic masculinity, debating the concepts it was invented to describe, and asking whether the term and the reasoning behind it are useful for Christians.



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    Transcript







    I once watched a video that moved me to tears. It was directed towards men, lifting them up and thanking them. Shot and scored to seem supportive and inspirational, it proclaimed, “We believe in the best in men” as it graciously encouraged them to continue the good work in standing up against bullying and harassment, and setting a good example for young boys, the men of the future.There was only one problem with the video. Near the start, it used the words “toxic masculinity.” And social media erupted in a furore. The internet blossomed out into thinkpieces. People genuinely watched this video and came away feeling matronised at best and at worst, made to feel guilty just for being born with a Y chromosome. The only explanation I can think of for the viral infamy of the Gillette ad, is that for many people “toxic masculinity” is a trigger phrase so strong as to drown out literally everything else. For many, especially conservatives and/or Christians, “toxic masculinity” is a weapon invented by feminists to discredit all manhood. Yet that, quite clearly, was not what the Gillette ad was intended to do. Taken on its own terms, it was intended to be inspiring, encouraging, and supportive of masculinity. So what went wrong? I mean, let’s recap here: you have a multimillion dollar corporation producing a major video ad aimed, or ostensibly aimed, at men, and it uses a two-word phrase that results in thousands declaring a boycott on their products. I mean, it’s kind of unlikely that the Gillette board members got together and said, “Hey, how can we insult half the human race?” It’s a lot more likely that they very cynically sat down to create something that was going to be wildly controversial, or that the ad is not in fact aimed at men but at women, who, let’s face it, are always going to prefer to shave their legs with products that aren’t cool with sexual harassment. But, the fact remains that even if this was a cynical shock-jock gambit, the ad still needed plausible deniability. After all, the vast majority of women, even the vast majority of women who prefer not to be sexually harassed, love and respect and would never want to belittle the men in their lives. Even if it briefly used some controversial language - good gravy, I can’t believe “me too” is controversial but there ya go, welcome to 2019 - even if the terms it used were open to misunderstanding, the ad still needed to be by and large genuinely supportive of men. For this gambit to work at all, “toxic masculinity” needs plausibly to mean something other than “all men are garbage and the world would be better off without them.”And that’s what we’re going to talk about in this episode. Welcome back to the Monstrous Regiment. I’m Suzannah Rowntree, and today we’ll be defining toxic masculinity, debating the concepts it was invented to describe, and asking whether the term and the reasoning behin...

    On the Transformed Wife and Marital Rape

    On the Transformed Wife and Marital Rape

    On the Transformed Wife and Marital Rape











































    Hosts







    The Monstrous Crew







































    Description







    Monstrous host Toni Kolb and her brother Christ Hutto review a recent talk by The Transformed Wife on the topic of marital rape, and have a frank discussion about the conclusions contained therein.



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A must

Godly women fighting for the Kingdom. Must listen.

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