5 episodes

“Truer, but also darker.” This is the real origin story behind America’s decision to go to the moon. The story we learn starts with Sputnik, then President Kennedy’s challenge, and ends with triumph: an American flag on the lunar surface. But in the 50 years that have passed since the moon landing, as presidential documents have been declassified and secret programs have been revealed, a wilder story has begun to emerge. “Moonrise,” a new Washington Post narrative mini-series, digs into the nuclear arms race of the Cold War, the transformation of American society and politics, and even the birth of science fiction, to unearth what really drove us to the moon. Join host Lillian Cunningham as she uncovers a story that has so much to reveal about America -- and about the dreams and nightmares of being human on this Earth.

Moonrise The Washington Post

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.4, 1.2K Ratings

“Truer, but also darker.” This is the real origin story behind America’s decision to go to the moon. The story we learn starts with Sputnik, then President Kennedy’s challenge, and ends with triumph: an American flag on the lunar surface. But in the 50 years that have passed since the moon landing, as presidential documents have been declassified and secret programs have been revealed, a wilder story has begun to emerge. “Moonrise,” a new Washington Post narrative mini-series, digs into the nuclear arms race of the Cold War, the transformation of American society and politics, and even the birth of science fiction, to unearth what really drove us to the moon. Join host Lillian Cunningham as she uncovers a story that has so much to reveal about America -- and about the dreams and nightmares of being human on this Earth.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5
1.2K Ratings

1.2K Ratings

MWEsser ,

Disrespectful

While I liked the explanation of how Science Fiction of the Thirties and the Forties influenced the actual science that ultimately lead to the development of space travel, I find the third episode about Werner von Braun very disrespectful to the victims of this war criminal. It is a proven fact that more than 20,000 prisoners died in the concentration camp adjacent to the Mittelwerk factory where the V2 rocket was built (and not some 3,000 to 6,000 as Michael Neufeld is allowed to misstate in the episode). Furthermore, von Braun didn’t only see the conditions in this factory, he actively was involved in getting Sklave laborers to be sent there from Buchenwald and he was involved in their selection. Read for example the much more informed biography by Wayne Biddle, a Johns Hopkins professor and Pulitzer Prize winner, “Dark Side of the Moon”. It’s a pity that a Washington Post podcast contributes to the whitewashing of a perpetrator like von Braun.

StElmozFire ,

Entertaining podcast about a great subject

I really enjoy listening to this cast. It makes me want to find out and know more. I appreciate the references to the sources, and I like the way the diverse streams of information are woven into a coherent whole. I like the narration as well. The narrator seems to be enthusiastic about the subject.

JeffR2 ,

Excellent content and story-telling, pace a little slow

I love the story progression: great depth and breadth. Well researched, well thought out. Homepage on WaPo site is engaging. Only change I’d make is the pace of the voicing: it’s notably slower-paced than most podcasts. Audio itself is good; I’d be OK with a little faster pace.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by The Washington Post