6 episodes

The Moorland–Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) is recognized as one of the world's largest and most comprehensive repositories for the documentation of the history and culture of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and other parts of the world. As one of Howard University's major research facilities, the MSRC collects, preserves, and makes available for research a wide range of resources chronicling the Black experience.
The MSRC is named after Jesse E. Moorland, an alumnus and trustee of Howard, and Arthur B. Spingarn, learned bibliophile of writers who would be considered Negro in the United States.
In 1914, Moorland gifted his collection of some 3,000 books, pamphlets, and other historical items to the University

Moorland-Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) Howard University

    • History

The Moorland–Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) is recognized as one of the world's largest and most comprehensive repositories for the documentation of the history and culture of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and other parts of the world. As one of Howard University's major research facilities, the MSRC collects, preserves, and makes available for research a wide range of resources chronicling the Black experience.
The MSRC is named after Jesse E. Moorland, an alumnus and trustee of Howard, and Arthur B. Spingarn, learned bibliophile of writers who would be considered Negro in the United States.
In 1914, Moorland gifted his collection of some 3,000 books, pamphlets, and other historical items to the University

    Bayard Rustin Interview 2.13.70

    Bayard Rustin Interview 2.13.70

    Bayard Rustin (/ˈbaɪərd/; March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) was an American leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, pacifism and non-violence, and gay rights.
    In the pacifist Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), Rustin practiced nonviolence. He was a leading activist of the early 1947–1955 civil-rights movement, helping to initiate a 1947 Freedom Ride to challenge with civil disobedience racial segregation on interstate busing. He recognized Martin Luther King, Jr.'s leadership, and helped to organize the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to strengthen King's leadership; Rustin promoted the philosophy of nonviolence and the practices of nonviolent resistance, which he had observed while working with Gandhi's movement in India. Rustin became a leading strategist of the civil rights movement from 1955–1968. He was the chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which was headed by A. Philip Randolph, the leading African-American labor-union president and socialist.[1][2] Rustin also influenced young activists, such as Tom Kahn and Stokely Carmichael, in organizations like the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
    -Excerpt from Wikipeadia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayard_Rustin)

    • 42 min
    Unita Blackwell Interview 8.10.68 Part_01

    Unita Blackwell Interview 8.10.68 Part_01

    Unita Blackwell (born March 18, 1933) is an American civil rights activist who was the first African-American woman, and the tenth African-American, to be elected mayor in the U.S. state of Mississippi.[1] Blackwell was a project director for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and helped organize voter drives for African-Americans across Mississippi. She is also a founder of the US China Peoples Friendship Association, a group dedicated to promoting cultural exchange between the United States and China. Barefootin', Blackwell's autobiography published in 2006, charts her activism.[2]
    -Excerpt from Wikipeadia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unita_Blackwell)

    • 31 min
    Unita Blackwell Interview 8.10.68 Part_02

    Unita Blackwell Interview 8.10.68 Part_02

    Unita Blackwell (born March 18, 1933) is an American civil rights activist who was the first African-American woman, and the tenth African-American, to be elected mayor in the U.S. state of Mississippi.[1] Blackwell was a project director for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and helped organize voter drives for African-Americans across Mississippi. She is also a founder of the US China Peoples Friendship Association, a group dedicated to promoting cultural exchange between the United States and China. Barefootin', Blackwell's autobiography published in 2006, charts her activism.[2]
    -Excerpt from Wikipeadia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unita_Blackwell)

    • 27 min
    Fannie Lou Hamer Interview 8.9.68 Part_01

    Fannie Lou Hamer Interview 8.9.68 Part_01

    Fannie Lou Hamer (born Fannie Lou Townsend; October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) was an American voting rights activist and civil rights leader.
    She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in that capacity. Her plain-spoken manner and fervent belief in the Biblical righteousness of her cause gained her a reputation as an electrifying speaker and constant activist of civil rights.

    • 31 min
    Fannie Lou Hamer Interview 8.9.68 Part_02

    Fannie Lou Hamer Interview 8.9.68 Part_02

    Fannie Lou Hamer (born Fannie Lou Townsend; October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) was an American voting rights activist and civil rights leader.
    She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in that capacity. Her plain-spoken manner and fervent belief in the Biblical righteousness of her cause gained her a reputation as an electrifying speaker and constant activist of civil rights.
    -Excerpt from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Lou_Hamer)

    • 31 min
    Fannie Lou Hamer Interview 8.9.68 Part_03

    Fannie Lou Hamer Interview 8.9.68 Part_03

    Fannie Lou Hamer (born Fannie Lou Townsend; October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) was an American voting rights activist and civil rights leader.
    She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in that capacity. Her plain-spoken manner and fervent belief in the Biblical righteousness of her cause gained her a reputation as an electrifying speaker and constant activist of civil rights.
    -Except from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Lou_Hamer)

    • 8 min

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