91 episodes

Conversations on news and culture with Kerri Miller. Weekdays from MPR News.

MPR News with Kerri Miller MPR

    • Arts
    • 4.4 • 141 Ratings

Conversations on news and culture with Kerri Miller. Weekdays from MPR News.

    What is the Democratic Party’s mandate?

    What is the Democratic Party’s mandate?

    After a tumultuous few weeks, President-elect Joe Biden will officially take the oath of office on Wednesday. Congress confirmed his Electoral College victory just hours after pro-Trump rioters broke into the Capitol building, temporarily delaying proceedings.  His administration’s ability to pass legislation opened up drastically, when Democrats Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff won Senate seats in Georgia’s runoff elections.  Their victories gave the Democratic caucus 50 seats in the Senate, which splits the chamber evenly with the Republican caucus. The tie-breaker vote will go to Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, garnering Democrats slight control so long as they can keep their party united.

    Democrats also held onto their majority in the House of Representatives, despite losing seats.The lackluster results for Democrats down the ticket spurred debates over what issues the party needs to focus on and whose votes they should be courting. Two political scientists joined MPR News host Kerri Miller for a conversation about the Democratic mandate for the Biden administration’s first 100 days.   

    Guests: Seth Masket is director of the Center on American Politics at the University of Denver. He is also the author of “Learning from Loss: The Democrats, 2016-2020.”Andrea Benjamin is an associate professor of African and African American studies at The University of Oklahoma and author of “Racial Coalition Building in Local Elections: Elite Cues and Cross-Ethnic Voting.” 

    Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS

    • 52 min
    COVID-19’s growing death toll reflects persistent health disparities

    COVID-19’s growing death toll reflects persistent health disparities

    Monday at 9 a.m., two physicians join MPR News host Kerri Miller for a conversation about the structural issues that exacerbate racial disparities in medicine as well as solutions for closing those gaps.

    • 48 min
    Did the pandemic give you new habits you want to break or keep? 

    Did the pandemic give you new habits you want to break or keep? 

    Friday at 9 a.m., host Kerri Miller talks with two experts about how the pandemic changed routines and how we can take advantage of the disruption to shape new habits for the better. 

    • 49 min
    President Trump impeached again. What happens next?

    President Trump impeached again. What happens next?

    The majority of the U.S. House voted Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump for a second time — making him the first U.S. president to be impeached twice.The vote was affirmed by every Democratic member and 10 Republicans. There were 197 Republicans who voted against impeachment, including all four of Minnesota’s GOP members. This unprecedented vote came exactly one week after lawmakers were forced to evacuate their proceedings to affirm the votes of the November election when a throng of armed pro-Trump rioters descended on the Capitol. Five people died as a result of the attack. Thousands of troops have already arrived in Washington and the National Guard says they’ll have 20,000 troops in D.C. for President-elect Biden’s inauguration.  Outgoing Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has hinted that he might vote in favor of impeaching the President, but has said that a trial in the Senate won’t start until after inauguration. Thursday, a historian and a politician spoke with MPR News host Kerri Miller about the events leading up to this moment and what is likely to happen next.Guests:


    Jeffrey Engel is founding director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University and co-author of “Impeachment: An American History.” He also co-hosts a podcast called “The Past, The Promise, The Presidency.”

    Khalilah Brown-Dean is associate professor of political science at Quinnipiac University and host of Disrupted on Connecticut Public Radio.

    • 48 min
    How years of disinformation led to an insurrection at the Capitol

    How years of disinformation led to an insurrection at the Capitol

    A pandemic of disinformation overwhelmed America in 2020, some of it culminating in armed, pro-Trump extremists taking over the U.S. Capitol. How did we get here? And what can we do about it? Tuesday, MPR News host Kerri Miller began a two-part series taking a hard look at the disinformation deluge and its consequences. Up first — a dissection of how disinformation spreads so easily. Coming soon — how to talk to a loved one caught in the web of conspiracy theories.

    • 49 min
    Why is the coronavirus vaccine rollout going slowly? 

    Why is the coronavirus vaccine rollout going slowly? 

    Every Monday, MPR Host Kerri Miller talks about pandemic science and policy. Coming up this Monday at 9 a.m. she’ll talk to two public health experts and take listener calls about the bumpy vaccination rollout and what can be done to ensure the next phase of vaccinations to the broader public will go more smoothly. 

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
141 Ratings

141 Ratings

Thunderforge ,

Informative and a joy to listen to

The topics are varied, the guests are wonderful, and the callers provide new perspectives that expand the discussion. A wonderful podcast for anyone who wants to expand their understanding on complex ideas.

Muslim vvvvvvv vvvvvvv vv ,

Extraordinary journalism

Kerri & her team are amazing at providing unbiased journalism about critical issues facing the world today.
Wish we had another 1000 like them.

weglanator ,

Always great, but far too much political coverage in an election year

I always enjoy the in-depth coversations and the expert guests on Kerri's show. Always well researched and well presented, so I have subscribed. However, during this election year there is far too much political coverage and there is not nearly enough time spent on other topics. I'd love to turn on the radio and listen to a story without commentary on the presidential candidates, but alas. Election coverage fatigue! I wish they would put all the political commentary on a separate podcast and keep it there.

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