137 episodes

You already binge on K-pop. Now, it's time to know a little about everything with your favorite Korean music historian! Journey through the entire catalog of some of Korean entertainment's most popular artists and become familiar with lesser-known acts with this "shortcast."

In May 2019, Ashley "Multifacetedacg" Griffin embarked upon an ambitious commitment to distinguishing herself as "Your favorite foreign Korean music historian" with the debut of Multifacetedacg Presents: An Album a Day (A3Day). The podcast traverses over 30 years of discographies with opinionated and fact-based commentary on weekdays and boasted an audience of over 7,000 listeners in its first year on Anchor.fm. The show now makes its home with Captivate.fm for the start of Season 4 in August 2020 and will continue to share the replay on TheGreatMoments YouTube channel.

Ashley is a diverse content creator. She specializes in Hallyu Wave entertainment, with an emphasis on K-pop and music production commentary.

This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy
Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Multifacetedacg Presents: An Album a Day Multifacetedacg

    • Music Commentary
    • 4.4 • 9 Ratings

You already binge on K-pop. Now, it's time to know a little about everything with your favorite Korean music historian! Journey through the entire catalog of some of Korean entertainment's most popular artists and become familiar with lesser-known acts with this "shortcast."

In May 2019, Ashley "Multifacetedacg" Griffin embarked upon an ambitious commitment to distinguishing herself as "Your favorite foreign Korean music historian" with the debut of Multifacetedacg Presents: An Album a Day (A3Day). The podcast traverses over 30 years of discographies with opinionated and fact-based commentary on weekdays and boasted an audience of over 7,000 listeners in its first year on Anchor.fm. The show now makes its home with Captivate.fm for the start of Season 4 in August 2020 and will continue to share the replay on TheGreatMoments YouTube channel.

Ashley is a diverse content creator. She specializes in Hallyu Wave entertainment, with an emphasis on K-pop and music production commentary.

This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy
Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    A-Jax "Snake" (2013) + Final Thoughts

    A-Jax "Snake" (2013) + Final Thoughts

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    On October 21, 2013, A-Jax was announced to have what would ultimately be their final comeback, “Snake.” The EP dabbled in the rock genre at a time when other boy groups in the scene were much heavier on synthesizers and other electronic dance music subgenres. We’re slithering around the final album and I’ll share my final thoughts, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, just a quick head’s up that this Friday, January 29, 2021, at 4:00 p.m. Central Time here in the States, Season 1 Episode 2 of A3Day Sister Show kicks off on http://www.a3daysistershow.com (www.a3daysistershow.com). Here’s a little about the show.
    [A3Day Sister Show trailer]
    Let’s assess “Snake,” a four-track EP (title track instrumental included) for what it truly was or is: a risky album to make. The guys had no reason to adjust their genre approach per se, and it might have done them in. Going against the masses is a worthwhile risk from time to time but the EP is simply “okay.” The title track, “Snake,” is playful and certainly funky but it’s not really for the club or the coffee shops. Now, don’t misunderstand, the song isn’t bad and works for radio and possibly a commercial along the lines of Old Navy here in the United States, but this should have been their second single.
    The track that should’ve headed this project off is “It Girl,” an RandB song with a sound adjacent to a jazz club of sorts. The sound and context works across several age groups and perhaps it wasn’t chosen as the first single because of this? I can’t imagine a 15-year-old falling in love with “It Girl” as much as an older teenager or friends in their 20s and 30s at norebang, so that could’ve been an obstacle. The final track, “Stay with me,” is another RandB song with a catchy rhythmically syllabic chorus. By the time I got into it, the song was going off -- it’s 3 minutes long. That’s not good.
    K-pop fans on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being essential listening and 1 not worth mentioning, the A3Day rating for this album and their complete Korean discography is a 4. That rank stems largely from their continued cohesive production and performance, and willingness to try something new. They eventually earned the number 13 spot on Korean charts with this one, but enlistments, amicable departures, and terminations marred the group from that point on. Whatever potential they had for advancing as a group, even with member changes, stopped at the end of this album. It’s a bit of a disappointment, honestly. They weren’t bad, but they weren’t standouts in the scene either. Whatever it is that they are pursuing these days, I truly wish them all the best.
    Continue to check out the #A3Day Highlights Playlist on Spotify, as it features tracks from today’s albums and past episode’s artists, and I’ll catch you in the next episode, bye y’all.
    There’s sponsored ads and social media hashtags but this show is truly supported by the efforts of my MACGoalas, the most amazing fan base a lil’ entertainer could ever have.
    Special shout out to my Patreon patrons -- the Student Body, the Scholars, and the Staff -- who keep my vision of becoming your favorite foreign Korean music historian, exploring all the industry from A to Z a real thing. If you’re interested in supporting the growth of this content, please visit patreon.com/multifacetedacg and for as little as $1.00 a month, you can get in on the magic.
    Interested in continuing your support at the fre

    • 5 min
    A-Jax "Insane" (2013)

    A-Jax "Insane" (2013)

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    The date is July 11, 2013, and A-Jax returned for a sophomore mini-album. Five tracks, 18 minutes, and a hunger for success. Did A-Jax make magic happen? Find out, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.
    Hey y’all, after reaching top 10 ranks with their debut EP, I’m convinced that A-Jax set out to prove something with “insane,” their follow-up album. It isn’t always necessary to provide an album with double-digit track listings, especially when the title track could stand on its own as an instrumental. It’s a complete shame that it isn’t available as an instrumental somewhere for me to devour, but I’ll get back to this song in just a moment.
    First on the album is “Don’t break my heart.” Don’t let this song’s title confuse you, it’s not a ballad and it’s not mopy. In fact,it’s a pulsing, futuristic dance track where the members are telling their love interest that things are over, all the while begging them to stay. I mistook the chorus as saying, “Don’t go out,” but they’re actually saying “go, go out.” I really enjoyed hearing the conflict! Suddenly, it stops and in creeps “Insane,” the title track.
    I’ll say this now, I’m truly biased towards this track. “Insane” follows a pattern that many dance music and instrumental producers, myself included, commit to. There is a drum kit that doesn’t let up while synths and other production effects encircle the vocals and it’s absolutely delicious. The music for the first verse is thick and highlights the lower vocals of the members, and then opens up sonically. The advancing sounds from the 38-second mark until its completion around 52 seconds is… this sounds like something I would’ve produced! It’s a tried and true escalation and the nuances are so pleasing. Even more unfortunate than not having an instrumental for me to boots-and-cats, in-my-living-room-nightclub dance to is, there is no information about who produced the track. How dare Korean entertainment companies?!?! Yes, I know that their philosophy is that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, 하지만 진지하게요, 왜요?! (Translation: But seriously, why?!)
    The party keeps going with track number three, “Don’t leave me.” This time, A-Jax’s mind is made up from the first song! If you need an idea of what the vibe is, think of the couple off to the side at a party who looks like they think they’re in a movie, drama, or music video, what with the dramatic movements and distressed facial expressions. Imagine 90s RandB hand motions and a drizzle of rain, for added effect. The emotions depart quickly with “Fantasy,” the fourth track that throws us back into Dance Dance Revolution mode. The guitars on this track are begging for you to acknowledge it, so do so with a thrashing of your body. The guys are somewhat swallowed up by the music in this track but it’s not a failure.
    A surprise for me was hearing the final track, “Thank ya,” as I immediately remembered hearing it in 2013. It was passive listening on a YouTube playlist, I’m certain, but the familiarity really made me smile. Actively listening now, there’s nothing wrong with the song except for a groaning sound effect at transitions in the song. I really wish they wouldn’t have done that! It’s not very distracting but it’s awkward. Especially given the lyrics, as they’re thanking their partner for being present and open to their love. And then you groan. Eww.
    K-pop fans on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 be

    • 5 min
    A-Jax "2MYX" (2012)

    A-Jax "2MYX" (2012)

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    When a group goes on informal hiatus or disbands, it can be a major disruption for fans. The Hallyu Wave is a vast ocean of artists having their moment in the sun, cresting, and quite possibly not rising to the same levels again. When today’s idol group had their contracts expire on March 31, 2019, had they made enough of an impact on the scene to potentially return as soloists? It’s almost been two years since then and it appears that they’ve moved on from idoldom. Let’s journey into the discography of former boy group A-Jax and hear their story, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, on June 1, 2012, South Korean boy band A-Jax made their debut with the song “One 4 U,” a song that was anticipated from the fan following developed through their survival show, Making the Star. Before they were known as DSP Boys, taking the approach of many Korean labels when a group is close to debut but not quite out of the pre-debut process. The month of April was spent introducing the members and concluded with an April 24, 2012 announcement that DSP Boys were to be called A-Jax. I’m actually fine with this name, as they chose to be named after the Greek mythological hero -- they wanted to convey courage and power. This is a name that makes sense, SoKo!
    When June 1 rolled around, then members Seo Jaehyung, Maeng Yunyoung, Moon Jihu (who previously went by Hyojun), Park Sungmin, Lee Seungyeop, Kim Dowoo (who previously went by Hyeongkon), and Ham Seungjin, released the single album plus “Never Let Go” but didn’t make major waves chart-wise. Their follow-up single, “Hot Game,” brought them to the peak position of number 59 on Korean charts, but both this single and their debut numerically remained lukewarm. They even took on the Japanese market immediately, re-releasing their singles in Japan. At least a buzz was starting to begin? It is hard to be on a label that housed disbanded seniors KARA and not be overshadowed by other boy bands like EXO and BIGBANG at the time when A-Jax started, but they didn’t back down.
    On November 15, 2012, A-Jax released their first EP entitled “2MYX” (“to my ex”) and climbed up to the number 6 spot on Korean charts. In just over five months, they made an impact with three unreleased songs alongside their three previous releases and deliver a 26-minute EP that is unique. First, the production choices pulled from established samples and styles that have worked for other artists without being too obvious. For the title track, “2MYX” utilizes a drum kit that will immediately resonate with fans of New Jack Swing. The best comparison is Michael Jackson’s “Keep it in the Closet,” and it works well for the song. This influence can likely be chalked up to the works of Korean American producer Steven Lee, who has produced and pinned multiple hits over his 20-year career.
    Second, the seven members of A-Jax maximized on choral singing, choosing to use as many of their vocals as possible in bridges, choruses, and refrains. Some groups make the distinction between vocal lines and rap lines very clear. By going with that “all-together-now” arrangement, it helped them stand out.
    They honestly remind me of 2PM's “1:59 PM” album with “2MYX.” The songs jump from one style to another throughout the EP and it is more flash in the pan than strategically planned. Therefore, K-pop fans on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being essential listening and 1 not worth mentioning, the A3Day rating for this album

    • 5 min
    2020 Rookie Roundup 5

    2020 Rookie Roundup 5

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    Welcome to the final Rookie Roundup for 2020 Korean idol groups. Today’s lineup consists of nine groups and my top three groups to watch, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.
    Hey y’all, tomorrow we move along with A-named idol groups but today, we’ve a bounty of new babies and one supergroup to acknowledge. The previous rookies brought a lot of enjoyment to my ears so I don’t think it’s premature to say that more great music is heading our way.
    In the previous Rookie Roundup for 2020, I mentioned that Refund Sisters was the follow-up supergroup to another group from the television show Hangout with Yoo. “The Nation’s MC” Yoo Jae-Suk combined forces with sensational soloists Rain and Lee Hyori to create SSAK3, and their music is good. I mean, for those of you who are fans of Korean t.v. series, you’re familiar with Yoo Jae-Suk in an unavoidable way. He’s one of the most well-known celebrities in South Korea, hands down, and absolutely loves music and dancing. I had a brief interaction with him on a t.v. set and was blown away by how he commands space, so pairing up with two other entertainment legends was bound to pull lots of attention. And so SSAK3 did, much to the frustration of some netizens who said they’d have an unfair advantage due to unbridled popularity. Thus, the standard to donate all proceeds from their works to charity was set for both them, and Lee Hyori’s second group, Refund Sisters.
    But come on now, what could they have expected from a group whose name is a play on the Korean word, “to sweep”? These are proven stars and star-quality sound coats their pop projects. Each album builds upon the concept and season of summer and there are other widely popular artists as features on their last album. In short, add them to your warm-weather playlist rotation.
    Next up, Star To A Young Culture, a six-member girl group on High Up Entertainment. Making their debut on November 12, 2020, StayC (get it, it’s the first letters of their longer name now stylized as its own name?) was formed by production team Black Eyed Pilseung and has an exciting production style. The group doesn’t have fluffy vocals or the stereotypical vocal softness of many girl groups on their first go-around. Their debut single album has two memorable tracks and I’m excited to hear more from them. Likewise, netizens who enjoy Korean dramas and K-pop are excited too, as member Park Si-eun is a popular actor and the daughter of solo male artist and former actor Park Nam Jung. Her dad invented the L-dance craze in the late 1980s -- I wonder if she’ll be able to innovate a dance with StayC? Side note, you have to YouTube the video of him performing with Super Junior. No other words to say except, “Do it!”
    Ten-member boy band TOO has too many people and that’s ridiculous of me to say when I’ve gone over a year with calling SM Entertainment’s NCT my bandmates. Though the group made their debut on April 1, 2020, their journey towards debut began publicly in 2019 on the t.v. show To Be World Klass. There were moments when I had a Stank Face of Approval while listening to their two albums and I am ready for more of whatever it is that Stone Music Entertainment has planned for them. They are really good and having almost a dozen members means that subunits could be the next thing for them.
    Speaking of 10- and 12-piece boy group combos, YG Entertainment released a dozen young men, two co-leaders included, onto the scene on August 7, 2020, by the name

    • 10 min
    2020 Rookie Roundup 4

    2020 Rookie Roundup 4

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    Welcome back to Rookie Roundup for 2020 Korean idol groups. Today’s lineup is MCND, P1Harmony, REDSQUARE, female super group Refund Sisters, and Secret Number, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, now that A3Day Sister show has made its formal introduction into the podcasting community, we can get back to work where we left off on here. If you missed the debut episode on Friday, January 15th, you can search “A3Day Sister Show” on your favorite podcasting platform and take a listen. The show is nothing like its sibling here and will only take place twice a month, so please anticipate a new episode with a special guest host later this month. More news will be available about it on all my social media accounts. If you aren’t following Multifacetedacg on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and the Kpop Amino app, then hop to it!
    First, Music Creates New Dreams, or MCND, made their debut on February 27, 2020, on TOP Media. The five-member boy group released two EPs in 2020 and recently came back on January 8, 2021, with their third. I appeal to the music production choices made by its members, as they are the sounds of young producers. When a music producer is getting started, there is a stock sound, per se, that we begin with. There’s a sense of understanding of how a song should or could work, but our skills aren’t developed enough just yet. There’s great potential in that area and some audible progression across their current discography. They’re truly a pop-genre group, focusing on hip-hop and RandB more than anything else.
    In a similar vein, FNC Entertainment’s P1Harmony is hip-hop and RandB focused, making their debut October 28, 2020, with an EP. I’m not against groups avoiding ballads but when you can hear that a group has the chops for it, it’s a slight tease. A couple of members of this six-member boy group sound like they have the capacity for soulful deliveries.
    Taking a departure from the young men, we move over to five-member girl group REDSQUARE who made their debut on May 19, 2020. The young ladies released a single album that is fairly catchy since their debut, as they have already experienced a music label change, signing with a new division of Taewon Entertainment called ICONICMnE. There’s potential but with only two songs to judge and no news of a comeback, their window of opportunity might be closed before they even had a chance to begin.
    There’s little to fear about false starts with our next group, Refund Sisters. For starters, this isn’t a rookie group, not in the traditional sense. They fall into the rookie category because they are collectively new to the scene as of October 20, 2020, but individually, they’re established in the industry. Spawning from the television show Hangout with Yoo, Refund Sisters is comprised of the “evergreen” multi-hyphenate Uhm Jung Hwa, the “nation’s fairy” Lee Hyori, Korean-American rapper and singer Jessi, and Mamamoo maknae Hwasa. That’s a heck of a lot of confident female energy to contend against the tv show’s other rookie group, who we’ll hear about next episode. Although I’m not a fan of Refund Sisters’ solo song, it’s awesome to hear the juniors with the established seniors. Also awesome is the fact that all proceeds from their promotions, and the group that came before them from the show, were donated to charity.
    Final girl group for the episode is Secret Number of Vine Entertainment. Making their debut on May 19, 2020, the five-member mu

    • 6 min
    2020 Rookie Roundup 3

    2020 Rookie Roundup 3

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    Welcome back to Rookie Roundup for 2020 Korean idol groups. It’s a day for the gentlemen only, as today’s lineup is E’LAST, ENHYPEN, Ghost9, HandD (한결,도현), and Lucy, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.
    Hey y’all, curl up with a soft blanket, good book, and a cuppa (British: “cup of”) for the first group, E’Last. Making their debut on June 9, 2020, on E Entertainment, this eight-member boy group is revitalizing. Think crisp winter air, morning rain, or how your nostrils kind of open up when toothpaste first hits your mouth. On two albums five months apart, the young men have a wonderful ballad sound. Don’t get me wrong, they made the mandatory pop track for their second album, but that’s it -- there’s only one track squeezed between soothing tracks and delightful vocals. E’Last, short for “everlasting,” took to YouTube to build a respectable fanbase before their debut, uploading weekly videos to showcase their unique colors. And, much like many other groups, we’ll be talking about from third and fourth generations, some of their members have had survival show experience. Ultimately, if you wish to feel like you’re in a K-drama montage, go with these guys.
    I genuinely didn’t realize that ENHYPEN only made their debut on November 30, 2020. I swore that their name was making the rounds for much longer than that. This is possibly because the seven-member boy band was first a part of the survival show I-Land? Whatever the case may be, within the fandom and commentary spaces I frequent, this group is talked about. Developed on Belift Lab, a collaboration between CJ ENM and Big Hit Entertainment, their debut EP sounds wonderful -- production is crisp and clean and the young gents sit within the tracks, never chasing after it nor being overpowered by the music. Ah yes, their name. At one point, they were going with the English letters EN and the hyphen symbol, but their name is to imply connection. I don’t know what the “en” is for, and I don’t think I ever will, but I enjoyed listening to them. That was not an intended joke.
    Ghost9 of Maroo Entertainment was formed in 2019 but made their debut on September 23, 2020. The nine guys vocally sound like ENHYPEN but the music production isn’t the same at all. That’s the major distinction for many artists on smaller labels -- the vocals might excel but the access to more competitive production sounds is limited. It was so off-putting for me on most of their tracks that I could have honestly gone with an acapella album from them. They come in with enticing introductions and then drop into an area that isn’t fully realized but it didn’t stop Ghost9 from earning a respectable peak position on the Korean music charts with their first of two EPs. In short, this is a group with awesome singers but in order to stick around long-term, their label will have to bring in production reinforcement.
    Well, this is interesting. HandD (한결,도현) is a subunit of boy group BAE173 who made their debut on April 21, 2020. The duo consists of Lee Han Gyul, who has a singing voice that’s more mature than his age, and rapper Nam Do Hyon. If you look up more information about the two of them, I can promise you that Han Gyul’s story will get a reaction out of you. That being said, they are a great combo and everything they released prior to their BAE173 debut is worth your time.
    Last, is four-member live band Lucy who made their debut on May 8, 2020, on Mystic Story. Named after a nei

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

BBrie ,

Love it!

She is such a great personality. I love your takes on the music and I’m so glad the podcast is on this platform now! Seeing you continuously grow is awesome.

Ms Cates ,

Wonderful Podcast

So glad this has been made into a podcast. I always watched this on YouTube, but it will be so nice to listen to this in the car.

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