143 episodes

You already binge on K-pop. Now, it's time to know a little about everything with your favorite Korean music historian! Journey through the entire catalog of some of Korean entertainment's most popular artists and become familiar with lesser-known acts with this "shortcast."

In May 2019, Ashley "Multifacetedacg" Griffin embarked upon an ambitious commitment to distinguishing herself as "Your favorite foreign Korean music historian" with the debut of Multifacetedacg Presents: An Album a Day (A3Day). The podcast traverses over 30 years of discographies with opinionated and fact-based commentary on weekdays and boasted a global audience with fans from over 60 countries.

Ashley is a diverse content creator. She specializes in Hallyu Wave entertainment, with an emphasis on K-pop and music production commentary.

This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy
Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Multifacetedacg Presents: An Album a Da‪y‬ Multifacetedacg

    • Music Commentary
    • 4.4 • 9 Ratings

You already binge on K-pop. Now, it's time to know a little about everything with your favorite Korean music historian! Journey through the entire catalog of some of Korean entertainment's most popular artists and become familiar with lesser-known acts with this "shortcast."

In May 2019, Ashley "Multifacetedacg" Griffin embarked upon an ambitious commitment to distinguishing herself as "Your favorite foreign Korean music historian" with the debut of Multifacetedacg Presents: An Album a Day (A3Day). The podcast traverses over 30 years of discographies with opinionated and fact-based commentary on weekdays and boasted a global audience with fans from over 60 countries.

Ashley is a diverse content creator. She specializes in Hallyu Wave entertainment, with an emphasis on K-pop and music production commentary.

This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy
Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    AlphaBAT "Attention" (2014)

    AlphaBAT "Attention" (2014)

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    It’s the middle of winter in North America and the covid-19 pandemic experience is almost a year old in the United States. Through your support of the show -- both through reviews, listenership, and in some cases, financial contributions -- the pandemic bumped A3Day around a bit but didn’t end. Thank you! Being the host of this podcast is a true joy for me and a true energy drainer while juggling responsibilities away from this microphone. Therefore, there will be a long break between this season and the next.
    During this time, I will be participating in guest spots on other shows, mentoring, supporting the development of a brand ambassadorship program within the podcast community, researching and developing episodes for Season 6, and preparing details for the potential return of the podcast festival my team hosted in 2020. Most importantly, I’ll be resting. It might not sound like it, based on what I just shared, but know that I’ll be basking in rest.
    We aren’t finished yet, k-pop fans. First, our final idol group of Season 5, the men of AlphaBat, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.
    Hey y’all, in 2012 two young men were set to debut as AlphaBAT under an agency called YUB Entertainment. By the time the group made its debut in 2013, one fully departed the scene while the other, Shin Selin, changed his stage name to Iota -- the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet -- and was joined by eight other young men, all named after letters in the Greek alphabet. You would think that he would be the leader since he was an original member, but that belonged to the member who went by Beta. “Alpha” was reserved for their fandom.
    Allow me to break down the name of AlphaBAT’s members, past and present:
    Ji Ha Yong, aka Beta
    Yoo Yeong Jin aka Epsilon, the older brother of Ricky of boy group Teen Top
    Lee Yeon Woo aka Lambda
    Lee Yong Hun aka Kappa
    Kim Jun Su aka Gamma
    Kim Sang Hun aka Code, whose name isn’t in the Greek alphabet and who almost made his debut with EXO
    Choi Yeon Soo aka Delta, who almost made his debut with boy group BOYFRIEND
    Lee San Ha aka Fie (Pi)
    Seol Jun aka Heta, another almost-EXO-member
    Shin Se Lin aka Iota
    Kim Su Yeob aka Jeta (Zeta), and
    Cho Gyu Min, who went by his first name and left the alphabet alone
    This was during the time when double-digit groups were the way to play, trying to compete with the behemoth that is… was? … the original EXO lineup, numerically brought to us by the efforts of Super Junior. We’ll learn more about these groups later down the line.
    After leaving YUB Entertainment, AlphaBAT made their home at Simtong Entertainment and technically made their debut on November 12, 2013, with a performance of “AB City” for Arirang: Simply K-pop. I say “technically” because their label at the time selected November 14, 2013, as their official debut date. This is also the day that they performed on M! Countdown for the first time and just what was the reason for rejecting the Arirang moment? Is it because that’s South Korea’s premier English-language television network? Who knows, but things went well, apparently. The positive reception sent them into the release of their first studio album, “Attention,” released February 25, 2014.
    I remember the debut single’s video. I was tickled by the refrain of the English alphabet and overwhelmed by the size of the group. I found them somehow by way of another large boy group called Topp Dogg, but that’s a story for another time. What tickles me now is the fac

    • 9 min
    Almeng "compoSING of Love" (2014)

    Almeng "compoSING of Love" (2014)

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    Unexpected. It’s the first word that comes to mind when reflecting on today’s group, co-ed duo Almeng. The “little eggs” (the meaning of the group’s name in Korean) are K-pop Star 3 alumnus who combine hip-hop and RandB with an unexpected approach. Their short discography, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, the Goodpods app takeover is tomorrow, February 10, 2021. I need your help in helping the Black into K-pop Coalition gain at least 25 group members on the app! Goodpod’s mission is simple -- making it easy for people to find great podcasts by following their friends to see what they’re listening to and for podcasters to grow their audiences through word of mouth recommendations. It’s a social media platform exclusively for podcast content. How cool is that? Download the app, follow my profile, Multifacetedacg, and check out some of my favorite podcasts outside of the Hallyu Wave.
    Last thing before we get started. BKC wanted to let you know about an awesome giveaway we're doing right now to uplift Black podcasters in the K-Pop fanbase. We're giving a one hundred dollar Amazon gift card to one lucky listener. All you have to do to enter to win is to head to Podchaser and leave a review for any BKC podcast (or an episode of their podcast) in the month of February. We've made it really easy for you with a list of all the BKC podcasts. Just go to http://podchaser.com/bkc (podchaser.com/bkc) and start leaving reviews to enter. Again that's http://podchaser.com/bkc (podchaser.com/bkc) and you could win!
    Onto the music!
    Almeng consists of two members -- miss Choi Rin and mister Lee Haeyong -- born in October in 1990. Unlike our most recent co-ed duo, these two are not siblings but met during their days in college. An Internet search of images of the group gives you no idea what type of music you’ll hear. Even more cleverly, stereotypical expectations will make you believe that once you hear the first few sounds of their music, you know who’s bringing what type of vocal experience to the table. Unless you were consumed with interest from K-pop Star 3 in 2013 and 2014, you’d have no idea that Choi Rin soars in rapping and Lee Haeyong’s grainy singing voice is wonderful. Although these lanes occasionally cross on their October 12, 2014 debut album, “compoSING of Love,” both members know where they excel.
    “compoSING of Love” was released with YNB Entertainment and features six tracks, making it a lovely EP. Choi Rin can sing but the woman has range when rapping. Her tone is intriguing and her cadences are worth a rewind, language comprehension doesn’t even matter. Lee Haeyong takes the theme of the album, love, and convinces you that it’s essential to a life well-lived with his gorgeous vocals. And both members joined hands in writing, composing, and producing their debut album, making it a true reflection of their ages and style. They once joked about this, stating in an interview with Korean publication News 1 that because Lee Haeyong had already served in the military, his writing brings more to the music process than similar duos because of life experience, acknowledging their entertainment seniors AKMU in the process.
    What I enjoyed most about this album is the fact that they sound mature. This is not a jab at other artists and I don’t want it to be mistaken as such. These artists were already in their early 20s when they made their debut and each single they’ve released since “compoSING of Love” reflec

    • 7 min
    Akdong Musician: Final Thoughts

    Akdong Musician: Final Thoughts

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    Today marks the end of our time with Akdong Musician and I’m sad to see them go. Final Thoughts are rarely scripted but there was no need to extend myself for what has clearly been an enjoyable collection of songs. You likely know what the overall discography ranking is by now. Albums Summer Episode, Sailing and Happening, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, February is Black History Month and I’m participating in activities the remainder of this month with Black Into K-pop! Black Into K-pop (BKC) is a coalition, cohort, and community of Black K-pop podcasts coming together during the month of February, to collaborate with each other in a variety of ways. You can visit https://blackintokpop.tumblr.com/ (https://blackintokpop.tumblr.com/) to learn more about the members and view our calendar. One upcoming event that you can definitely participate in regardless of ethnicity is the Goodpods app takeover on February 10, 2021.
    Goodpod’s mission is simple -- making it easy for people to find great podcasts by following their friends to see what they’re listening to and for podcasters to grow their audiences through word of mouth recommendations. It’s a social media platform exclusively for podcast content. How cool is that? Download the app, follow my profile, Multifacetedacg, and check out some of my favorite podcasts outside of the Hallyu Wave.
    Last thing before we get started. BKC wanted to let you know about an awesome giveaway we're doing right now to uplift Black podcasters in the K-Pop fanbase. We're giving a one hundred dollar Amazon gift card to one lucky listener. All you have to do to enter to win is to head to Podchaser and leave a review for any BKC podcast (or an episode of their podcast) in the month of February. We've made it really easy for you with a list of all the BKC podcasts. Just go to http://podchaser.com/bkc (podchaser.com/bkc) and start leaving reviews to enter. Again that's http://podchaser.com/bkc (podchaser.com/bkc) and you could win!
    Onto the music, onto the music!
    In 2017, AKMU released two songs to add to your road trip playlist with their July 20th release, Summer Episode. The two songs, “Dinosaur” and “My Darling” are upbeat and feel like the energy of summer, but I remember “Dinosaur” promotions the most from that year. And for what it’s worth, it was lovely of them to have given their fans and general listeners three seasons of music to enjoy, as hiatus was inevitable. Lee Chan-hyuk after all had mandatory military enlistment that began that September. While he served the South Korean Marines, Lee Su-hyun had solo schedules in radio and television.
    When it was time to come back together, the duo released the eclectic “Sailing” on September 25, 2019. This album sounds nothing like their past albums, all the while staying true to their unique sound and colors. The 35 minutes of playtime skips to-and-fro between pop, folk, Americana, and rock genres. By the time I reached the third track on the 10-track album, I found myself excited about what the next song could possibly sound like. It was hard to set an expectation, but the course could be trusted, much like the experience of sailing. You step onto your boat, feeling it adjust itself to the waves, and set sail into whatever may come.
    And if November 16, 2020, was any clue, their latest release, “Happening,” is a sign of something to come along the lines of “Sailing.” The single album is edgy and a potential prelude to a dynami

    • 6 min
    AKMU "WINTER" (2017)

    AKMU "WINTER" (2017)

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    As seasons go, “WINTER” has come, coincidentally during the winter of 2021, no less. The final part to the two-part series Puberty, from sibling duo AKMU, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, before we start with the details of today’s album, I’m excited to announce A3Day’s first giveaway! The Staff tiered patrons from my Patreon are spearheading a K-pop merchandise giveaway for listeners within the contingent 48 states that begins tonight, Friday, January 29, 2021, at 4:00 p.m. CT when the second episode of A3Day Sister Show releases. Follow me on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter at “multifacetedacg” to see the details, terms, and conditions. Good luck in advance!
    Today’s album, “Winter,” was released January 3, 2017, and is AKMU’s second studio album. With a listening time of 30 minutes, the duo takes you down a path of reflection with passionate, live instrumentation. Lee Su-hyun vocally performed her butt off on this album, traversing her soprano range up and down the music. This album was most relatable for me, in terms of its context and made the listening experience very personal.
    For those who don’t speak the Korean language, looking at the English titles of each song won’t really convey much. Whether they knew this or not, that plays into the wonder of winter, especially in places that experience snow. You don’t know what you’re waking up to from day to day -- it could be unseasonably warm or a genuine blizzard, regardless of what the weather forecast predicted. Titles such as “Play Ugly,” “CHOCOLADY,” and “Reality,” don’t necessarily tell you what you’re about to experience.
    Speaking of an experience, if you have a moment, search for a live performance of “Reality” on YouTube and try to resist smiling. While the music is playful, the realities of the lyrics -- struggling to afford a taxi, low bank account balances, and awkward moments in coupledom -- are in juxtaposition. The reality of these universal experiences for so many people warmed my heart. I’m at an age at the time of this recording where I can look back at how difficult some of these things were for me and feel the bittersweet reaction from knowledge. Someone younger or less experienced than me might find a balm to calm the anxiety as they listen to this song.
    The album elevated their folk-pop sound, and tap dances its way into jazz-pop, a subgenre I’m a huge fan of. On the reflective track, “Way Back Home,” a piano and shaker come together to accent AKMU’s rapping and singing over a mellow hip-hop beat pattern, but it’s actually jazz. It’s a great display of how music was never meant to be straight and narrow, but to cut lanes and spill into other areas. Music itself is as complex as the winter season. It’s also as simple as the still of winter nights.
    K-pop fans on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being essential listening and 1 not worth mentioning, the A3Day rating for this album is a 5. This album reflects maturity both within the Puberty concept and in its composition. Lee Chan-hyuk wrote and produced beautiful pieces with the assistance of a wonderful team. Continue to check out the #A3Day Highlights Playlist on Spotify, as it features tracks from today’s albums and past episode’s artists, and I’ll catch you in the next episode, bye y’all.
    There’s sponsored ads and social media hashtags but this show is truly supported by the efforts of my MACGoalas, the most amazing fan base a lil’ entertainer

    • 6 min
    AKMU "SPRING" (2016)

    AKMU "SPRING" (2016)

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    AKMU’s “PLAY” set the bar of excellence high. The duo took YG Entertainment down an unknown path of folk music and gained tremendously worthy attention. Were the siblings able to overcome the dreaded sophomore slump? Their May 4, 2016, EP “SPRING,” will tell us, right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, after the success of “PLAY,” Akdong Musician used the time in between to prepare for an ambitious follow-up entitled “SPRING.” The EP would be the first in a two-part series called Puberty. The album’s non-English title is “사춘기 상” (Sachun-gi Sang), which means “adolescent age,” so the youthful theme is the focus of the album. Before they released the EP, however, AKMU tapped into their acoustic folk roots with their single, “Time And Fallen Leaves.” If one were to assume that this was a precursor for what to anticipate with “SPRING,” then they’d be far off the mark.
    Their sophomore album took on a greater RandB vibe for its arrangements. While Lee Chan-hyuk continued the standard of writing the album, arrangements were predominantly made by someone named Robin. I cannot find who this Robin is and it’s frustrating to me! The people behind the behind-the-scenes of K-pop simply don’t receive enough fan service in my book. Did Robin receive any of the flowers they deserve from this album? Who knows! No, seriously: who knows because I want to find this person?
    Back to the music. While this is an enjoyable EP, it didn’t feel like an AKMU album. I fully acknowledge how premature this sounds from a person who had never listened to a full album of this duo until the previous episode of this show. Performing music that wasn’t fully of the folk genre when I’d set that as the expectation was jarring. Conversely, it makes sense: there is no benefit in forcing oneself to perform one genre. They never presented themselves as solely wanting to be an acoustic guitar, harmonizing duo. This was my assumption for the majority of their sound, and though this isn’t a full detour, “SPRING” allowed them to show more of their unique colors.
    The EP has six tracks and is a little over 21 minutes long. Perhaps this isn’t an intentional habit, but they used the middle of the album once again to provide a song that seems as if it’s louder than the others. Maybe they are playing into a smooth ascension towards these robustly-produced tracks? It could simply be my ears doing weird things, I’m not really sure! What I am sure of is how sad I was that the album ended so soon. It feels complete but they came out of the gate with a full studio album for debut. Giving a listener just 21 minutes seems unfair! And maybe they felt the same way, too, as “SPRING” is the only EP in AKMU’s discography.
    K-pop fans on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being essential listening and 1 not worth mentioning, the A3Day rating for this album is a 5. It has unexpected flair for new listeners and welcomed variety for invested fans. Continue to check out the #A3Day Highlights Playlist on Spotify, as it features tracks from today’s albums and past episode’s artists, and I’ll catch you in the next episode, bye y’all.
    There’s sponsored ads and social media hashtags but this show is truly supported by the efforts of my MACGoalas, the most amazing fan base a lil’ entertainer could ever have.
    Special shout out to my Patreon patrons -- the Student Body, the Scholars, and the Staff -- who keep my vision of becoming your favorite forei

    • 5 min
    AKMU "PLAY" (2014)

    AKMU "PLAY" (2014)

    An Album a Day is my exploration into the Korean music scene. This podcast will cover mainstream, indie and some underground artists within the scene and provide both factual and opinionated commentary. The biggest benefit to sharing my thoughts this way is that it will hopefully expose you to more great music and exploration of your own.
    In the world of K-pop idols, stories of long training processes and cultivation to be a star aren’t a new phenomenon. More particularly, having the process documented on a survival television show in South Korea isn’t a new thing either. However, when it comes to siblings Lee Chan-hyuk and Lee Su-hyun, South Korean born children who spent years in Mongolia with their missionary parents before returning to become the only major label pre-debut winners of K-pop Star 2? Well, that’s truly unique. Today, we begin exploring Mischievous Child Musician, better known as AKMU, and their debut album “PLAY,” right after the drop.
    You’re tuned into An Album a Day. Show start.


    Hey y’all, Akdong Musician, which literally means “mischievous child musician,” are a brother-sister duo signed to YG Entertainment, making their major-label debut on April 7, 2014. The timing of today’s episode couldn’t have been more perfect, as a report on major South Korean website Naver announced that they’ve renewed their contract with YG Entertainment for another five years. This means that the label will have been their home for a total of 12 years before they can consider other options. Before settling into the folds of one of Korea’s prominent entertainment companies, Lee Chan-hyuk and his little sister Lee Su-hyun lived a life outside of the spotlight.
    In fact, a portion of their life was financially hard, so much so that the siblings had to depart the traditional education system in favor of homeschooling from their mother. Despite this, their profound love for music led to them joining a small label once returning to Korea from their two-year placement in Mongolia, and performing in various areas around the country. It wasn’t until they auditioned for and won the second season of K-pop Star that their passion would become wider known. With Lee Chan-hyuk composing all their songs and Lee Su-hyun as the main vocalist, the duo spent the months after their 2012 win working hard on their debut album, “PLAY.”
    Their debut studio album is just over 38 minutes long and ushered in an unforgettable folk music experience into the idol scene. YG Entertainment maintains an active role in RandB and hip-hop artistry, but those involved in AKMU’s debut project, including the label’s founder himself, found themselves challenged in new ways. In fact, it was best to simply leave as much of the album as possible to the siblings, which is honestly the extra magical cherry on top of a dynamic album. There is a distinct sound to YG Entertainment artists -- that Teddy Park, actually, which is something we’ve acknowledged in past seasons of this show -- and AKMU’s debut album leaps out from behind that creative perimeter beautifully. Remember when I said things can hit you like fresh mint, that toothpaste tingle up to the nostrils? This entire album is that. For listeners with synesthesia, I can only imagine what you experience while listening to this album. It hit me at points like a forest of evergreen trees!
    Lee Chan-hyuk wrote every bit of the 11 tracks on the album and he and his sister flutter from one theme to the next wonderfully. And the YG Entertainment style isn’t 100% missing, as there are occasional raps and funky instrument flair on certain tracks. Stand out track “Hair Part” is a perfect example of this folk-jazz and hip-hop concoction, actually. The only thing that seems abrupt through the listening experience is “Artificial Grass.” It’s a boastful folk diddy that, though sma

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

BBrie ,

Love it!

She is such a great personality. I love your takes on the music and I’m so glad the podcast is on this platform now! Seeing you continuously grow is awesome.

Ms Cates ,

Wonderful Podcast

So glad this has been made into a podcast. I always watched this on YouTube, but it will be so nice to listen to this in the car.

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