49 episodes

We are a community of advocates that are linked by autism, but bound by strength.

Our mission is to spread autism awareness and acceptance in communities with communication platforms and educational resources. Our goal is to create a future where all individuals, regardless of how they think, feel and socialize, will be recognized for their gifts.

Simply put: We educate, support and empower.

WE ARE ONE VOICE MADE STRONGER.

My Autism Tribe Susan Scott

    • Kids & Family

We are a community of advocates that are linked by autism, but bound by strength.

Our mission is to spread autism awareness and acceptance in communities with communication platforms and educational resources. Our goal is to create a future where all individuals, regardless of how they think, feel and socialize, will be recognized for their gifts.

Simply put: We educate, support and empower.

WE ARE ONE VOICE MADE STRONGER.

    The Autism Cafe: A Place of Love and Self-Discovery

    The Autism Cafe: A Place of Love and Self-Discovery

    EPISODE 49: THE AUTISM CAFÉ – A PLACE OF LOVE AND SELF-DISCOVERY
    With Eileen Lamb
     
    INTRO:
    Hey, guys! Welcome to the My Autism Tribe podcast! If this is your first time, I’m glad you found us, and if you’ve been listening – welcome back! Today I’m speaking with Eileen Lamb. She’s the founder of blog The Autism Cafe, and she is also a writer and photographer. Born in France, she now lives in Austin, Texas with her husband and two sons, Charlie (6) and Jude (3). On her blog, she shares the ups and downs of raising a severely autistic child while being on the autism spectrum herself. You’re not gonna want to miss this one. I’m really excited to have her on the show today.
    Also, don’t forget to check us out on social media. That’s Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube. It’s My Autism Tribe across the board, so find us, follow us, join our tribe. We’d love to have you!
     
    SEGMENT:
    Before we start our interview, I’d like to share with you a quote from our guest today. You can find this on her blog The Autism Café: “Dear Strong Woman: You don’t show your pain because you heard that to be vulnerable is to be weak, that crying is a flaw, and that you need to get back up as soon as you fall. Yet you don’t.  I’m here to tell you that it’s okay if you can’t. Strength is finding the courage to speak up in a world that has been cruel to you. Strength is letting people in, no matter how many times you’ve been hurt before. Strength is being able to say, “I’m not okay right now. I need you.” Those are such powerful words, right? I’m so happy to welcome Eileen to our show.
     
    CONCLUSION:
    Eileen’s unique story, coupled with her absolutely stunning photography, is an inspiration and tribute to all who overcome the impossible and persevere for those they love. There are so many people out there that are, for whatever reason, traveling on this journey alone…but it doesn’t have to be that way. I hope you, and others, find relief in knowing that there are a lot of us traveling the same road and you don’t have to travel alone. As Eileen points out, road trips can be fun – why not join others. We are not alone. Thanks for being a part of My Autism Tribe and I’ll see ya next week!
     
    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
    https://theautismcafe.com/
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theautismcafe/
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theautismcafe/
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/theautismcafe
     
    Get a hardback copy here: All Across The Spectum
    Get the Kindle version here:  AATS on Amazon

    • 27 min
    Autism Adventures (with Big E)

    Autism Adventures (with Big E)

    EPISODE 48: AUTISM ADVENTURES (WITH BIG E)
    With Jacqui Folks
     
    INTRO:
    Hi there! Thanks for joining me today. I’m speaking with a busy mother of three young men, Jacqui Folks. Her middle son, Ethan, has autism, and she’s going to share her family’s story, along with some resources that she has been working on for the autism community.
    I also want to let you know that this week will mark the one-year anniversary for the My Autism Tribe podcast. It seems like yesterday that I started it, but it’s been a whirlwind and here I am one year later…still breathing…high five!
    If you haven’t had a chance to rate or review the My Autism Tribe podcast, it would absolutely be cool if you did. It helps people find our podcast – especially on Apple Podcasts. Thanks for listening, as always, and for going on this crazy journey with me. You’re the best!
     
    SEGMENT:
    Jacqui Folks son was diagnosed in 2003, a time when there were little resources out there for parents. Think about all the resources that we have now, including podcasts! She learned almost everything from books, but there was also something that she felt that was missing. I’m excited for her to share what that was. Please welcome Jacqui Folks.
     
    CONCLUSION:
    I love hearing inspirational stories from those in the autism community. We are a group of fighters ya know, and I mean that in a good way. A bunch of mama and papa bears, and fearless advocates, both on and off the spectrum that are clawing our way for better awareness and inclusion in our communities. It’s so awesome. Thanks for being a part of My Autism Tribe, and I’ll see ya next week!
     
    JACQUI’S BIO:
    When my son was diagnosed in 2003 there were little to no resources out there for parents. I learned almost everything I know from books. However, there were no children’s books I could share with him for his learning experience. It was always suggested to me to write social stories, and I did, but nothing is more catching than a good children’s book.  
    Over the years I have kept them and my dream was to have a series of Autism friendly books, with a main character who has Autism, for spectrum kids to listen and learn from. Well, my dream is coming true. Book one in our series is here!! These stories are something I longed for as I was raising my son. They would have been so helpful to just pick up and read before each life event. I would have used them daily at home, in the community and in the classroom. I feel confident that they can help others in the future.
    Here are a few reasons why:
    -Simple, short, direct and honest text that is actually used in the home. -Reference to visuals, picture boards -The same returning character with a simple and fun name. -The same start and end to each book, no matter how different the story or message is. Repetition is key! -There are several stories about Autism but very few series. In my research I only found two and they were short series not based on daily life skills. -My series does help with daily life skills but with fun illustrations and a relatable, adorable, supportive main character.
    -A lot of parents and educators do not know how to access or write social stories. Why not provide them for these families and educators?
     
    Awarded a top book of 2019 by Autism Live and featured in their 2019 Holiday Toy & Gift Guide:
    https://www.facebook.com/adventureswithBigE/

    • 31 min
    FUBAR: Autism Parenting

    FUBAR: Autism Parenting

    EPISODE 47: FUBAR: Autism Parenting
    With Jessica Temple
     
    INTRO: 
    If you spend just one minute on Google searching for parenting memes, you’ll be inundated with hilarious quotes and pictures on how to survive parenthood. It’s something that us parents get a few good laughs from, while we’re silently screaming inside. How many times have we questioned ourselves, “Will I get through this?”.
    My guest today, Jessica Temple, is the creator of a podcast called FUBAR: Surviving Parenthood with Special Needs Kids, and is also a board-certified clinical neuropsychologist. Her podcast is all about creating a non-judgmental space to realize that we all actually WILL live through this, and offer tips on making the survival of parenthood an actual possibility. It’s hilarious. Jessica and her husband have two children with special needs. Their oldest has autism, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, and developmental delays, and their youngest child had a perinatal stroke and has developmental delays. It’s a complete joy to welcome Jessica to our show today.
     
    CONCLUSION:
    There’s no perfect way of parenting, and as Jessica points out, there are always “fails”, “nails”, and “comical tales” along our journeys. Learn to embrace them, and know you are not alone. We’re all in it together. Thanks for joining me on my journey, and thanks for being a part of My Autism Tribe. See ya next week!
     
    Additional information: 
    Website: www.fubarpod.com
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/fubarpod
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fubarpod 
     

    • 30 min
    A Confession to My Autism Tribe

    A Confession to My Autism Tribe

    EPISODE 46: A Confession to My Autism Tribe
    with Susan Scott
     
    INTRO:
    Hi, everyone, Happy New Year! I hope you had an amazing send off to 2019.
    I announced last November that I was taking a podcast break, so I thought it would be fitting to have the first podcast of 2020 be a confession to you on why this happened. It’s a bit uncomfortable to share, but you deserve to know so stay tuned.
    Also, a reminder, if you’re enjoying this podcast, please rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts, and share with a friend. That’s how we make our voice stronger. Thanks so much for listening!
     
    SEGMENT:
    I haven’t always been completely honest with myself and others. When people have asked me if I was ok, I would say, “I’m great!” because let’s face it, do people really want to know what kind of crappy day that you’re having when they ask you that question? I’ve even looked in the mirror and told myself that things were moving along quite smoothly, and things were looking up…when in fact, I felt like I was drowning. Perhaps a part of me was trying to “fake it ‘til I made it”.
    In November of last year (2019), when I announced that I was taking a break in December, it was from complete and utter burnout. The kind of physical, mental and emotional burnout that left me feeling scatterbrained (beyond normal), dazed, not willing to make an effort of everyday duties like laundry, etc. But even worse than that, I felt myself disconnecting from my son. I was in my own world. That’s when I realized that taking a break was absolutely, without a doubt, imperative.
    My Autism Tribe was formed initially as a standalone podcast, but then added a nonprofit component. This has proven to be one of the hardest challenges in my life. In 2019, I very literally poured every ounce of energy that I had (after caring and loving on my son) into this organization and podcast. I’ve had some event successes, and other events that have fallen flat on their faces. I don’t have an administration team helping me every day. It’s 99.9% me. I don’t have a significant other that can offer encouragement when I’ve had a bad day, and I know that many of you are in the same situation. It’s tough to keep all the plates spinning and still feel sane, am I right? But I’m not sharing this stuff with you for sympathy. I’m sharing because I want you to know about how some of my viewpoints have changed.
    In the month of December, I did a lot of thinking, a lot of reflecting, a lot of praying, and I’ve decided that I’m going to change things up a bit. Let me explain.
    Up until now, I’ve intentionally kept the My Autism Tribe social platforms very “branded”, if you will. I felt like this was a direction that I needed to originally go to establish the My Autism Tribe name, but upon reflection, it completely defeats the purpose of why I started My Autism Tribe to begin with. I wanted to reach people on a very human level, and I’ve done that to some extent through the podcast, but my promise to you is that I start letting you in to my personal life more. I’m always asking guests and followers to share their stories, but what about mine? At first, I thought, “Why in the world would anyone want to see my everyday life”, but then I realized that this is the very thing that I gravitate towards when I’m searching for connection with others. I can’t promise that you still won’t see branded content, because I still very much believe it’s important as a nonprofit, but I can promise you that I will be sharing more of my family. It’s going to feel weird initially, because I’ve never been one to share details of my life with just anyone, and there are some details that I will still hold close to my chest that are just too personal to share and may involve others, but well, welcome to my family’s life. I apologize in adv

    • 11 min
    Sharing an Autism Diagnosis

    Sharing an Autism Diagnosis

    EPISODE 45: SHARING AN AUTISM DIAGNOSIS
     
    INTRO:
    Hello, Friends! Thanks for joining me. This is the last podcast for the 2019 season. I want to take this time to thank each and every one of you for an amazing ride in 2019 – the first official year of this podcast and the My Autism Tribe nonprofit organization. I’m really excited about all of the advocacy plans that we already have for 2020…I’ll give you a hint on a couple: plans for a residential autism community, and an entire children’s book series. Buckle up for a wild and exciting year. As we finish out this year, I thought it would be fitting to take a podcast break before we start our second season. This time is going to be used to soak in every minute with family during the holidays. I want you to do the same. Don’t worry, we’ll still be on our social platforms, encouraging, empowering and supporting our friends. And without further ado, let’s get started with this podcast. It’s a solo episode and I’m talking about receiving an autism diagnosis, and sharing this diagnosis with family, friends, coworkers, really anyone that is involved in you or your child’s life. I’ll also share some tips that I’ve learned from personal experience, in addition to tips that others have shared.
    And you’re enjoying this podcast, we kindly request that you rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts, and share with a friend. That’s how we make our voice stronger. Thanks for listening!
    SEGMENT:
    One thing is certain, any kind of diagnosis received, whether for yourself, your child, another family member, or friend, can and will lead to questions. Three and a half years ago, my son received his autism diagnosis, and I wasn’t prepared for what followed. As many of you know, you’re immediately thrown into the unknown world jam-packed and overloaded with libraries of information – whether you want to be or not. It’s part of it. Plain and simple. The days that follow can be some pretty dark ones. As you’re wrapping your head around the very definition of autism, which let’s face it, is a pretty loose one…it’s a SPECTRUM, right? You’re asking doctors questions, asking yourself questions, and then…people start asking YOU questions. Questions that, I guarantee, you aren’t prepared for. YOU are only in the beginning stages of answering questions that you have.
    I wasn’t sure how to answer most of them, and to be honest, my son’s diagnosis wasn’t something that I was even comfortable sharing with others until I had taken the time to process it. I’ve spoken with many individuals on the spectrum, heard their stories on receiving the diagnosis (sometimes much later in life), heard stories from parents on their child’s diagnosis, and all of them have had different journeys, but they also share many similarities. The most common similarity being that it was just flat out challenging to explain autism to their family and friends. And they were even undecided initially if they should say anything at all. I get it – and I bet most of you all do, too.
    Autism is definitely something that people are becoming more aware of, but just as you were in the early stages of diagnosis, they may have a limited understanding of what it looks like. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there as well that has skewed people’s perceptions. Media has recently helped with overall awareness – characters being written in to scripts for films and television shows, even times with the lead character being on the spectrum. But conversations can inevitably have Rain Man throwbacks, and questions of certain savant qualities. We all know these responses to the stereotypes of what autism is, and that maybe your child doesn’t fit in that box.
    A little sidebar, by the way. You’ll hear me reference “your child” throughout this, and I apologize in advance.

    • 12 min
    Autism, Art & Honesty

    Autism, Art & Honesty

    EPISODE 44: AUTISM, ART & HONESTY
     
    INTRO:
    Hey, everyone! Thanks so much for joining me today. I’m speaking with Megan Heinz, an autism mom who has been dedicated and passionate about creating accepting and inclusive environments for her son on the spectrum. She’s also gonna share a super cool way that she has been able to connect with her son through art.
    And, also a reminder, if you’re enjoying this podcast, please rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts, and share with a friend. That’s how we make our voice stronger. Thanks for listening!
    SEGMENT:
    I first connected with Megan Heinz on her Instagram page entitled “Above Typical”; a page that she created to inspire others and connect through autism, art and honesty. A place to laugh and to learn. She shares the real, un-sugarcoated everyday life of her family, and I love how she has taken a somewhat unique approach in bonding with her son through art. I can’t wait for her to share her story on how she fell into this. Please welcome this episode’s amazing guest, Megan Heinz.
     
    CONCLUSION:
    Parents have a huge influence over a child’s development and happiness. But this influence can look extremely different from family to family. No textbooks, no manuals, but each family trying to figure out how to best parent their child that has come into this world with their own temperaments, their own personalities, and their own strengths and weaknesses. We teach our children, and they teach us. That’s what is so awesome! To everyone out there putting forth what I know to be an amazing effort to support our children, thank you. Keep up the great work, and thanks for being a part of My Autism Tribe. See ya next week!
     
    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
    www.abovetypical.com
    https://www.instagram.com/abovetypical/
    https://www.facebook.com/abovetypicalfamily

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

Ldechica ,

Must listen!

This is a great podcast! Susan offers a great community/tribe for parents of children with autism to find their support network and to gain resources to survive! She has great and informative guests and has lots of tips to help you cope with burnout and stress!

Happy Fam 4 ,

A broad range of info

Susan works to provide a broad range of information on her podcast. She is compassionate and this show is a great resource for parents of children with autism. There is information here that is applicable from early to late childhood. A great listen!

LoveliestLadybug ,

It’s my child

I listen to each podcast and think, “That’s my child!” I feel like I’m not alone. Questions are answered and new doors are opened. You give hope to those who get buried and lost in the spectrum maze. My heart is full knowing so many others care.

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