100 episodes

The National Committee on United States-China Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan educational organization that encourages understanding and cooperation between the United States and Greater China in the belief that sound and productive Sino-American relations serve vital American and world interests. With over four decades of experience developing innovative programs at the forefront of U.S.–China relations, the National Committee focuses its exchange, educational and policy activities on politics and security, education, governance and civil society, economic cooperation, media and transnational issues, addressing these with respect to mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

NCUSCR Events National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

    • Government
    • 4.3, 10 Ratings

The National Committee on United States-China Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan educational organization that encourages understanding and cooperation between the United States and Greater China in the belief that sound and productive Sino-American relations serve vital American and world interests. With over four decades of experience developing innovative programs at the forefront of U.S.–China relations, the National Committee focuses its exchange, educational and policy activities on politics and security, education, governance and civil society, economic cooperation, media and transnational issues, addressing these with respect to mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

    Yingyi Ma | Ambitious and Anxious: How Chinese Undergraduates Succeed and Struggle in American Higher Education

    Yingyi Ma | Ambitious and Anxious: How Chinese Undergraduates Succeed and Struggle in American Higher Education

    In her new book, "Ambitious and Anxious: How Chinese Undergraduates Succeed and Struggle in American Higher Education," based on research conducted both in the United States and in China, Yingyi Ma argues that Chinese college student experiences of American education spring from the enormous social changes in China of the last few decades, creating both ambition and anxiety. She offers some policy suggestions to American educators and administrators, starting with the recruitment process, running through classroom practices, and concluding with career services. On June 23, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Dr. Ma where she discussed her book. Speaker bio: ncuscr.org/event/ambitious-and-anxious

    • 1 hr 2 min
    James Carter | Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai

    James Carter | Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai

    What were some of the forces roiling Shanghai, and by extension, China as a whole, in the early 1940’s? In Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai, Dr. James Carter describes the many worlds of Shanghai on the eve of World War II, focusing on the city’s famed race track a few weeks before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  
    In capturing the confluence of these three disparate, coexisting worlds on November 12, 1941, Professor Carter explores the multi-faceted history of old Shanghai and the various international influences, characters, and events that shaped the city’s evolution and its profound schisms. He joined the National Committee on June 16, 2020 for a virtual program to discuss his new book.  
    Speaker bio: https://www.ncuscr.org/event/carter-champions-day

    • 59 min
    Margaret Lewis | The U.S. Department of Justice's China Initiative

    Margaret Lewis | The U.S. Department of Justice's China Initiative

    The Department of Justice launched the China Initiative in November 2018 to counter national security threats emanating from the People’s Republic of China (PRC). In February 2020, the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced that it had launched about a thousand active investigations under the Initiative; the China Initiative is gaining momentum.   
    In a forthcoming article, Seton Hall University Law Professor Margaret K. Lewis argues that using “China” as the glue connecting cases under the Initiative’s umbrella creates an overly inclusive conception of the threat, and attaches a criminal taint to entities that have an even tangential connection to China. A better path would be to discard the “China Initiative” framing, focus on cases’ individual characteristics, and broaden the Department of Justice’s interactions with non-governmental experts.   
    On June 9, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Margaret Lewis where she discussed her article.

    • 1 hr
    Jennifer Ho, John Pomfret | The Coronavirus, Anti-Asian Racism in the United States, and Sino-American Relations

    Jennifer Ho, John Pomfret | The Coronavirus, Anti-Asian Racism in the United States, and Sino-American Relations

    With the spread of COVID-19 in the United States, reports of racism against Asian-Americans have risen sharply, drawing renewed attention to issues of bias, immigration, and the place of Asian-Americans in society. The current surge of anti-Asian incidents highlights a troubling history, and reinforces the urgent need to examine, understand, and confront these issues that affect the lives of Asian-Americans, influence American perceptions of China, and ultimately affect Sino-American relations on the global stage.  On June 2, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual discussion with Jennifer Ho, professor of ethnic studies at University of Colorado and president of the Association for Asian American Studies, and John Pomfret, former Washington Post correspondent and author of The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: America and China, 1776 to the Present, on the history of anti-Chinese/Asian racism in the United States, the impact of coronavirus-related racism, and the importance of uniting across our communities to stand up against all forms of discrimination. For more on the coronavirus and its social impacts on the people of the United States and China, please visit ncuscr.org/coronavirus.

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Jude Blanchette, Sun Yun | Two Sessions, Two Directions, Many Challenges

    Jude Blanchette, Sun Yun | Two Sessions, Two Directions, Many Challenges

    The 2020 annual meetings of the National People’s Congress (NPC) and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), known as the “Two Sessions” or “Lianghui,” were originally scheduled to begin in Beijing on March 5. The meetings were postponed due to the novel coronavirus outbreak, and new dates were announced in late April: the CPPCC meeting began instead on May 21 and the NPC on May 22. 
    At past Two Sessions, the leadership unveiled its target for GDP growth for the year, presented a road map for the year ahead, and closed with a news conference during which the premier took vetted questions from Chinese and foreign journalists. Given the impact of COVID-19, objectives, formats, and announcements were very different this year. 
    On May 29, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Mr. Jude Blanchette, Freeman Chair of China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Ms. Sun Yun, senior fellow and co-director of the East Asia Program and director of the China Program at the Stimson Center, both members of the Committee’s Public Intellectuals Program, to reflect on key takeaways from the 2020 Two Sessions.

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Coronavirus Crisis: Prospects for U.S.-China Cooperation in Combatting the Global Economic Downturn

    Coronavirus Crisis: Prospects for U.S.-China Cooperation in Combatting the Global Economic Downturn

    As the COVID-19 pandemic presents unprecedented challenges to every level of the global economy, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is bringing together leading American and Chinese experts on economics and trade to share analysis and projections on the issues. We invite you to join us for a series of virtual programs, Coronavirus Crisis: What it means for U.S.-China Economic & Trade Relations, over the next month. 
    The final program in the series, Coronavirus Crisis: Prospects for U.S.-China Cooperation in Combatting the Global Economic Downturn, was held on May 27, 2020. The speakers included: Nicholas R. Lardy, Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics; Robert E. Rubin, Former U.S. Treasury Secretary; Lu Feng, Director, China Macroeconomic Research Center, Peking University; Yao Yang, Boya Chair Professor and Dean, National School of Development, Peking University.  
    For more information on the potential economic, social, and political impacts of the coronavirus outbreak, and its long-term implications for U.S.-China relations, please visit https://www.ncuscr.org/coronavirus 

    • 1 hr 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

cbus kid ,

Interesting but bad audio

The speakers and topics of this podcast are great, and if you want to get into the weeds on wonky China issues its a good podcast to listen to. However, some of the audio is really bad. Bad enough that I've skipped whole episodes. NCUSCR, please work on this...

tommy_esmeralda ,

Terrible audio quality

Sounds like a recording from a phone in someone's pocket.

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