299 episodes

This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversations with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in American Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

National Gallery of Art | Audio The National Gallery of Art

    • Visual Arts

This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversations with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in American Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

    Wyeth Lecture in American Art: Art Is an Excuse: Conceptual Strategies, 1968–1983

    Wyeth Lecture in American Art: Art Is an Excuse: Conceptual Strategies, 1968–1983

    Kellie Jones, Columbia University. In this lecture, presented on November 6, 2019, Kellie Jones, of Columbia University, looks at international conceptual art networks and the making of global community in the late twentieth century. The lecture considers moments in the global reach of performance art in the 1970s in locales from Mexico City to London to Los Angeles, considering projects by artists including Felipe Ehrenberg, Lourdes Grobet, Adrian Piper, Senga Nengudi, and David Lamelas.

    • 51 min
    The Problem with Renoir: A Hard Look at the Artist on the Centennial of His Death April 2, 2020, 11:18 AM

    The Problem with Renoir: A Hard Look at the Artist on the Centennial of His Death April 2, 2020, 11:18 AM

    Mary Morton, curator and head of French paintings, National Gallery of Art Auguste Renoir rebelled against the standards of the official art world, like other impressionists, pushing the limits of painting and creating his distinct style. But Renoir, in particular, has become an all-too-easy target for museumgoers who find his late female figures contrived and his palette cloying. Marking the centennial of the artist’s death in 1919, Mary Morton counters the anti-Renoir movement by reaffirming the artist’s achievement and lasting significance within the history of Western art in her lecture on December 3, 2019.

    • 51 min
    Degas at the Opéra: Introductory Slide Overview

    Degas at the Opéra: Introductory Slide Overview

    Edgar Degas was fascinated by music, opera, and ballet throughout his long career. He was a regular attendee at the old Paris Opéra house on the Rue Le Peletier through his early career, and then at the Garnier Opéra after its opening in 1875. Degas explored every aspect of the world of the opera—from rehearsals to performances, from the practice rooms to the stage. Yet his many paintings of the rehearsal rooms and the operas were never done on the spot; they were the product of his careful study of the ballerinas, singers, and musicians posed in his studio. The leader of the avant-garde group known as the impressionists, Degas always asserted that nothing was less spontaneous than his art. He kept volumes of drawings of figures, from every conceivable angle, that he would return to time and again for compositions throughout his career. He was interested in the body in motion and at rest, often in characteristic (if awkward) positions. Toward the end of his life, when his sight began to fail, Degas substituted brilliant color for the precise draftsmanship of his earlier work. To celebrate the exhibition, on March 13, 2020, Eric Denker, Senior Lecturer, National Gallery of Art, provides an overview of the exhibition.

    • 51 min
    Raphael and his Circle: Introductory Slide Overview

    Raphael and his Circle: Introductory Slide Overview

    Eric Denker, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art Raphael is recognized by many as the foremost figure of the classical tradition in Western painting. Unparalleled in the complexity of his style and the near reverence his art has inspired over the five centuries since his death, few artists are so deserving of commemoration. In the early twentieth century, the mark of a great Italian collection in the United States was to have work by Raphael. No Michelangelo paintings or sculpture were in America’s collections, nor any work by Leonardo da Vinci. However collectors in the United States astutely acquired 14 paintings by Raphael, five of which would become part of the National Gallery of Art’s collection. To celebrate the exhibition marking the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death, Eric Denker, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, gave this talk on March 13, 2020. He provides an overview of the exhibition and examines the Gallery’s extraordinary collection of paintings, drawings, and prints by Raphael and his workshop.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Introduction to the Exhibition-Raphael and His Circle

    Introduction to the Exhibition-Raphael and His Circle

    Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art In celebration of the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death, the Gallery presents 25 prints and drawings in an intimate installation. The works illustrate how Raphael’s art shaped the standard of aesthetic excellence for later artists, connoisseurs, and scholars. The exhibition features four drawings by Raphael: the sheet from which the design of his painting Saint George and the Dragon was transferred; the cartoon for the so-called Belle Jardinière; a detailed representation of the prophets Hosea and Jonah; and a well-known study for part of the frescoes in the church of Santa Maria della Pace in Rome. Nine drawings by his closest collaborators and followers—Giulio Romano, Polidoro da Caravaggio, and Perino del Vaga—are also on view. The exhibition includes 10 engravings, as well as a chiaroscuro woodcut, by the earliest interpreters of Raphael’s designs: Marcantonio Raimondi and his followers Agostino dei Musi and Marco Dente as well as Ugo da Carpi. To celebrate the exhibition opening, on February 21, 2020, Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art, provided an overview of the exhibition.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Coding Our Collection: The National Gallery of Art Datathon

    Coding Our Collection: The National Gallery of Art Datathon

    The National Gallery of Art will be the first American art museum to invite teams of data scientists and art historians to analyze, contextualize, and visualize its permanent collection data. The Gallery’s full permanent collection data has been released to six teams of researchers from institutions including Bennington College, Carnegie Mellon University, Duke University, George Mason University, Macalester College, New College of Florida, University of California, Los Angeles, and Williams College. Questions from curators, conservators, and researchers will help guide this analysis, and teams are encouraged to pursue whichever avenues of inquiry they find most compelling. The study will culminate in a two-day Datathon during which the teams will finalize their visualizations and present their findings at a public livestreamed event on Friday, October 25, 2019, at 3:30 p.m. The project is led by Diana Greenwald, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, National Gallery of Art.

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

HagenThomann ,

Fantastic show

I just recently stumbled into this podcast but I couldn’t be happier I did!
Fantastic episodes and lots of interesting content.
Can’t wait to go back to DC and see ‘The Life of Animals in Japanese Art’!
Thank you and keep up the great work!

铿兑有 ,

Love the lectures but

Would be wonderful if the audience could see the pictures.

musicandartlover ,

Art if the Harpsichord

Very interesting, though one longs to see the photos of the splendid instruments, too. One suggestion: since the speakers thought to conclude their presentation with a performance of Bach on harpsichord, this audio listener would have loved to have heard the full piece. Instead, the podcast faded it out very quickly. Why not include it all? Thanks.

Top Podcasts In Visual Arts

Listeners Also Subscribed To