18 episodes

NCUSCR's new podcast series features short interviews and explainers on timely issues in the U.S.-China relationship with leading experts. For more interviews, videos, and links to events, please visit us at: www.ncuscr.org.

The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is the leading American nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that encourages understanding of China and the United States among citizens of both countries.

NCUSCR U.S.-China Insights National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

    • News

NCUSCR's new podcast series features short interviews and explainers on timely issues in the U.S.-China relationship with leading experts. For more interviews, videos, and links to events, please visit us at: www.ncuscr.org.

The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is the leading American nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that encourages understanding of China and the United States among citizens of both countries.

    Margaret Lewis on Tsai Ing-wen and the Future of Taiwan

    Margaret Lewis on Tsai Ing-wen and the Future of Taiwan

    President Tsai Ing-wen was re-elected in January, 2020, on a platform similar to that of her first term, yet new cross-Strait developments and changing challenges at home suggest the next four years may not be a continuation of the status quo. Seton Hall University law professor and Taiwan expert Margaret Lewis explores the possibilities for mainland-Taiwan relations as well as the local issues that will define both Tsai's second term and the near future of Taiwan.

    • 4 min
    Matt Sheehan on the Transpacific Tech Sector: Collaboration and Competition

    Matt Sheehan on the Transpacific Tech Sector: Collaboration and Competition

    The United States and China have historically maintained an organic relationship of exchange in the tech world: sharing financial capital, professional talent, innovative research and ideas. At the same time, individual companies have competed for dominance in each other’s and global markets. Yet as cases like Huawei have shown, in recent years Washington has chosen to increasingly restrict and monitor the tech industry's ties to China, in an effort to contend with Beijing's own involvement within this field. In this episode of U.S.-China Insights, expert Matt Sheehan explains the collaborative and competitive nature of the U.S.-China tech relationship, and how it will be affected by attempts to 'securitize' and even decouple the tech sector.
    Matt Sheehan is a fellow at the Paulson Institute's think tank, MacroPolo, where he leads the team’s work on U.S.-China technology issues, specializing in artificial intelligence. He is the author of "The Transpacific Experiment: How China and California Collaborate and Compete for our Future."

    • 9 min
    Five Economists Explain

    Five Economists Explain

    Leading American and Chinese economists answer one question: name one way the the U.S.-China trade war has affected the American economy and global trade over the past two years. Despite the signing of a phase-one deal on January 15, until all tariffs are lifted, many of these adverse impacts will continue.
    Dr. Huang Yiping, Professor and Deputy Dean, National School of Development, Peking University
    Dr. Nicholas Lardy, Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics; Vice Chair of the Board, National Committee on U.S.-China Relations
    Dr. Liang Hong, Head of Research, Member of the Management Committee, China International Capital Corporation
    Dr. Catherine L. Mann, Global Chief Economist, Citi
    Dr. Stephen Roach, Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, Yale University; Former Chairman, Morgan Stanley Asia

    • 4 min
    Lucas Sin on Chinese Cuisine in the United States

    Lucas Sin on Chinese Cuisine in the United States

    What can food teach us about history, immigration, and international relations? For Lucas Sin, chef and culinary director of Junzi Kitchen, food is a window into a larger world, one where Chinese and American culture and history collide, mix, and transform. From four-thousand-year-old noodles to Nixon’s 1972 'chopstick diplomacy,' from the suburbanization of Americanized Chinese food to the modern proliferation of regional and fusion styles, Chef Sin discusses the evolving landscape of Chinese cuisine in the United States, and its ability to change perspectives by sparking connections between people.
    Lucas Sin opened his first restaurant when he was 16, in an abandoned newspaper factory in his hometown of Hong Kong. Despite spending his Yale undergraduate years in the Cognitive Science and English departments, Lucas spent his weekends running restaurants out of his dorm, known as Y Pop-up. After stints at Michelin 3-star Kikunoi Honten in Kyoto and Modernist Cuisine in Seattle, he is now on a mission to revitalize Chinese cuisine in the United States as the chef and culinary director of Junzi Kitchen.

    • 9 min
    The Trade War’s Global Consequences with Natalia Gurushina

    The Trade War’s Global Consequences with Natalia Gurushina

    When the world’s two largest economies become mired in trade conflict, there are bound to be global consequences. As analysts predict increasing risk for a global economic downturn, VanEck’s Chief Emerging Markets Economist Natalia Gurushina looks at what the trade war might mean for other countries, and explains how these consequences could have unforeseen repercussions for both the United States and China. 
    Natalia Gurushina is the chief emerging markets economist for VanEck’s Emerging Markets Unconstrained Fixed Income Strategy. She has been a member of the Investment Management Team since 2013. Prior to joining VanEck, Dr. Gurushina worked for Roubini Global Economics, where she was responsible for Emerging Markets Currency/Fixed Income and G10 Currency Strategies. She has also previously worked as an analyst at Pantera Capital Management, a Tiger Management spin-off, and as an EMEA economist at Deutsche Bank. Dr. Gurushina holds a Ph.D. in economic history from the University of Oxford and a B.A. in economics from Moscow State University.

    • 8 min
    Amy Celico on Protectionism in U.S.-China Trade

    Amy Celico on Protectionism in U.S.-China Trade

    The role government should play in the free market has always been a contentious issue, even more so when international trade jeopardizes national security. As the standoff between the United States and China continues, disagreements over what constitutes mutually acceptable trade practices are becoming more entrenched, with both governments accusing the other of interference and overreach. Watch Amy Celico of Albright Stonebridge Group discuss how concerns over economic competition and national security inform U.S. implementation of trade strategies like market protectionism and ‘securitization.’

    Amy Celico is a principal of Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategic advisory and commercial diplomacy firm, and leads the firm’s China practice in Washington, D.C. She has more than 20 years of experience working on China issues. Previously, Ms. Celico served as senior director for China affairs at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. She also worked at the U.S. Departments of Commerce and State in Beijing and Shanghai, as well as the International Trade Administration and the Bureau of Intelligence and Research in Washington, D.C. Ms. Celico serves on the Board of Directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.

    • 9 min

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