26 episodes

We publish research on the emergence of frontier technology, the themes driving it, and the companies making it a reality. In this podcast, we dive into Neurotech, and the individuals that are working on advancing the technology.

Neurotech Podcast Loup Ventures

    • Technology
    • 4.9 • 11 Ratings

We publish research on the emergence of frontier technology, the themes driving it, and the companies making it a reality. In this podcast, we dive into Neurotech, and the individuals that are working on advancing the technology.

    028 – Roundtable: Neurotech vs Neuroscience

    028 – Roundtable: Neurotech vs Neuroscience

    Vikash Gilja is an assistant professor at UCSD, where he researchers brain-machine interfaces. Dr. Gilja is an advisor to Paradromics. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University, an M.Eng and B.S. in EECS from MIT, and a B.S. in brain and cognitive sciences from MIT.

    Rob Edgington is the head of AI at Paradromics. He holds a Ph.D. in brain-machine interfaces from UCL, and an M.Phys in physics from the University of Oxford.

    Konrad Kording is a full professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he works on data problems in neuroscience. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from ETH Zurich.

    Top 3 Takeaways



    * Basic neuroscience and neural engineering can and should co-evolve, much the same as physics and electrical engineering.

    * More granular understandings from neuroscience help inform machine learning models applied in neurotechnology.

    * Speech prostheses are a promising area for modern BMIs.





    Show Notes



    * [1:10] Rob’s introduction.

    * [1:24] Konrad’s introduction.

    * [1:35] Vikash’s introduction.

    * [1:47] Avery’s introduction.

    * [2:05] Neuroscience vs. neurotechnology.

    * [2:55] Basic science and causality.

    * [3:35] Definition of causality.

    * [6:10] Closed-loops require causal models.

    * [8:15] Visual system as closing the loop.

    * [9:55] Electrical engineering is an analogy to neural engineering.

    * [12:20] Modern BMI devices.

    * [13:00] More data means more degrees of freedom.

    * [15:15] Distributed recordings.

    * [19:40] Data processing constraints in BMI.

    * [20:00] Ontology refinement.

    * [22:35] Timescale of tool development.

    * [23:45] Future-proofing a BMI.

    * [25:00] On-chip processing.

    * [26:00] Evolution of BMIs.

    * [27:15] Industry is good for integrating engineering constraints.

    * [29:30] Estimating intended speech.

    * [30:20] Neurotech for locked-in patients.

    * [32:30] Visual communication.

    * [34:00] ML vs. DL in neurotech.

    * [37:00] Better models are inspired by basic science.

    * [38:35] Hiring in neurotechnology.



    Selected Links



    * Paradromics

    * The Neurotechnology Age – Matt Angle, CEO Paradromics



    Related Podcasts



    * 010 – Matt Angle

    * 026 – Gordon Wilson

    * 027 – Marc Ferro



    Disclaimer

    • 41 min
    027 – Marc Ferro

    027 – Marc Ferro

    Marc Ferro is a post-doctoral researcher at Stanford University. Marc holds a Ph.D. from École des Mines de Saint-Étienne and an undergraduate degree from École nationale supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne.

    Top 3 Takeaways



    * Small neural interfaces improve signal quality.

    * Small neural interfaces avoid biological damage.

    * Researchers and entrepreneurs have many commonalities.





    Show Notes



    * [0:59] Marc’s background.

    * [2:22] Biggest materials science challenges in neural interfaces.

    * [4:30] Respecting brain tissue.

    * [5:30] Initial insult vs. chronic injury.

    * [7:30] Constraints on neural interfaces.

    * [9:30] NeuroRoots.

    * [11:00] Status of NeuroRoots.

    * [12:15] NeuroRoots vs. other cutting-edge interfaces.

    * [17:08] Researchers as entrepreneurs.

    * [19:48] What kind of skillsets do neural interfaces teams need to have?



    Selected Links



    * NeuroRoots

    * BrainMind talks

    * Zen and Art of Motorcycle Maintenance



    Related Podcasts



    * 010 – Matt Angle

    * 020 – Mary Beth Henderson

    * 024 – Brian Pepin



    Disclaimer

    • 24 min
    026 – Gordon Wilson

    026 – Gordon Wilson

    Gordon Wilson is the CEO of Rain Neuromorphics, a company developing neuromorphic computer chips to enable brain-like artificial intelligence. Gordon holds a B.S. in Statistics and Mathematics from the University of Florida.

    Top 3 Takeaways



    * Training deep learning algorithms is expensive.

    * To understand the brain, you need to build one.

    * Modern computing hardware doesn’t have the parallelism and energy efficiency of the brain.





    Show Notes



    * [1:12] Building a processor for brain math.

    * [2:40] The cost of artificial neural networks.

    * [3:36] What is “brain-inspired hardware”?

    * [4:50] Nanowires and memristors.

    * [6:25] Cross-disciplinary chip design.

    * [7:30] Size of the brain vs. size of artificial neural networks.

    * [9:05] Research vs. development.

    * [12:00] Bridging brain science and AI.

    * [13:54] Neuromorphics vs. GPUs.

    * [18:00] Chips on the market.

    * [20:40] Go-to-market: matrix multiplication.

    * [22:22] Cost and energy of Rain’s hardware.

    * [23:33] Does chip design impact software development?

    * [24:08] Fusing training and inference.

    * [26:26] Wide learning vs. deep learning.

    * [29:30] Sparse learning.

    * [32:10] Gordon’s book recommendations.



    Selected Links



    * A talk by Gordon

    * An article about Rain’s technology

    * OpenAI’s blog

    * On Intelligence, by Jeff Hawkins

    * WaitButWhy, a blog by Tim Urban



    Related Podcasts



    * 002 – Jeff Hawkins

    * 020 – Mary Beth Henderson

    * 024 – Brian Pepin



    Disclaimer

    • 35 min
    025 – Alik Widge

    025 – Alik Widge

    Dr. Alik Widge is an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, where he is a practicing psychiatrist and conducts research in applying neurotechnology to psychiatric disorders. Alik holds a B.A. in computer science and cognitive science from Dartmouth College, a Ph.D. in robotics from Carnegie Mellon University, and an M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

    Top 3 Takeaways



    * Alik’s work pursues the idea of nudging brain networks underlying psychiatric disorders.

    * Nudges are about reinstating normal emotional dynamics, rather than moving emotion to a particular regime.

    * Cross-training scientists and clinicians can lead to novel perspectives on psychiatric treatments.





    Show Notes



    * [1:22] Alik’s background & overview of his current work.

    * [2:55] Synthesizing fields impacts Alik’s approach.

    * [3:28] Networks and nudges.

    * [5:03] Regions vs. networks in neurotechnology.

    * [6:00] History of depression interventions.

    * [9:00] Biology vs. historical neurology.

    * [10:00] Networks of different scales.

    * [12:15] What does a “nudge” look like?

    * [15:55] Behavioral therapy & neuromodulation nudges.

    * [19:00] Neuroscience vs. psychiatry.

    * [21:00] New language in psychiatry.

    * [23:35] Needed changes in industry.

    * [26:00] Specialized chips in neural implants.

    * [27:20] Alik’s recent paper.



    Selected Links



    * Alik’s paper.



    Related Podcasts



    * 021 – Cory Inman

    * 020 – Mary Beth Henderson

    * 024 – Brian Pepin



    Disclaimer

    • 32 min
    024 – Brian Pepin

    024 – Brian Pepin

    Brian Pepin is the CEO and founder of Rune Labs. Brian holds an MSEE in electrical engineering from UC Berkeley and a BSEE from the University of Washington. Prior to starting Rune, Brian spent nearly five years at Verily Life Sciences.

    Top 3 Takeaways



    * It makes sense to use neuromodulation therapies for neurological and psychiatric disorders that inherently fluctuate over time.

    * Neuromodulation data is siloed and that slows down research and translation.

    * Closed-loop DBS can enable novel, more efficacious therapies.





    Show Notes



    * [0:47] Brian’s background.

    * [1:50] The Google phase.

    * [3:10] Brian’s transition into Rune Labs.

    * [3:30] Rune in a nutshell.

    * [4:32] Unmet needs for brain diseases.

    * [5:58] Why neuromodulation instead of drugs.

    * [7:30] Need for adaptive therapies.

    * [8:53] Impact of neuromodulation in Parkinson’s Disorder.

    * [10:54] Who fits the bill for DBS.

    * [13:30] Siloed data in neuromodulation.

    * [15:15] Competition in DBS.

    * [16:45] Initial application of closed-loop DBS is auto-tune.

    * [17:30] Closed-loop can enable therapies.

    * [19:03] Software development in DBS devices.

    * [20:10] Partnerships between medical device companies and AI companies.

    * [21:27] Long-term vision for Rune.



    Selected Links



    * Strive PD patient-facing application



    Related Podcasts



    * 021 – Cory Inman

    * 020 – Mary Beth Henderson

    * 016 – Jim Cavuoto



    Disclaimer

    • 23 min
    023 – Jeff June

    023 – Jeff June

    Jeff June is the founder and CEO of IschemiaCare. Jeff comes from a background in venture capital and private equity, and held the Forsythe Chair in Entrepreneurship at Miami University of Ohio.

    Top 3 Takeaways



    In 40% of stroke cases, the specific cause is unknown.

    * Stroke care can benefit from greater diagnostic personalization.

    * Having the right people in your life and on your team is an outsized advantage.





    Show Notes



    * [1:00] Jeff’s background.

    * [2:45] Origin of IschemiaCare.

    * [5:52] What IschemiaCare does.

    * [8:05] A-fib stroke.

    * [10:20] How IschemiaCare gains usage.

    * [13:30] IschemiaCare’s business model.

    * [15:20] Growth plan.

    * [16:00] IschemiaCare’s product and how it fits into stroke care pipeline.

    * [17:50] The RNA data play.

    * [19:40] Extrapolating data insights.

    * [23:40] Key lessons about healthtech.

    * [27:30] Reminding people of your mission.

    * [30:00] Doug’s meme on the Loup website.



    Selected Links



    * IschemiaCare

    * Stroke care guidelines



    Related Podcasts



    * 020 – Mary Beth Henderson

    * 017 – Ana Maiques

    * 013 – Ladan Jiracek, Manfred Franke, and Doug Clinton



    Disclaimer

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

Alan G. ,

Welcome to podcasting!

We’ve followed Gene Munster for years and are huge fans! How to cool to have Gene and company join the audio revolution!

simone1 ,

great insight

as always - the people from Loup Ventures that do the Braintech podcast don't disappoint. Give it a listen!

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