212 episodes

Interview with Poets about their New Books
Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

New Books in Poetry Marshall Poe

    • Arts
    • 3.9 • 15 Ratings

Interview with Poets about their New Books
Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    81* David Ferry, Roger Reeves, and the Underworld

    81* David Ferry, Roger Reeves, and the Underworld

    Since the original airing of this episode in June 2021, Roger Reeves' second book Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. was published by W.W. Norton, and the paperback edition of David Ferry's translation of The Aeneid was published by the University of Chicago Press.
    The underworld, that repository of the Shades of the Dead, gets a lot of traffic from heroes (Gilgamesh, Theseus, Odysseus, Aeneas) and poets (Orpheus, Virgil, Dante). Some come down for information or in hopes of rescuing or just seeing their loved ones, or perhaps for a sense of comfort in their grief. They often find those they have loved, but they rarely can bring them back. Comfort they never find, at least not in any easy way.
    In conversation with Elizabeth for this episode of Recall this Book, originally broadcast back in 2021, poets Roger Reeves and David Ferry join the procession through the underworld, each one leading the other. They talk about David’s poem Resemblance, in which he sees his father, whose grave he just visited, eating in the corner of a small New Jersey restaurant and “listening to a conversation/With two or three others—Shades of the Dead come back/From where they went to when they went away?”
    Roger reads “Grendel’s Mother,” in which the worlds of Grendel and Orpheus and George Floyd coexist but do not resemble each other, and where Grendel’s mother hears her dying son and refuses the heaven he might be called to, since entering it means he’d have to die.
    Mentioned in this episode

    David Ferry, Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations, University of Chicago Press

    Virgil, The Aeneid, translated by David Ferry, University of Chicago Press

    Roger Reeves, Error! Hyperlink reference not valid., Copper Canyon Press

    Jonathan Culler, Theory of the Lyric , Harvard University Press.

    Read transcript of the episode here.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    • 47 min
    Alison Calder, "Synaptic" (U Regina Press, 2022)

    Alison Calder, "Synaptic" (U Regina Press, 2022)

    This intricate, yearning work from award-winning poet Alison Calder asks us to think about the way we perceive and the ways in which we seek to know ourselves and others.
    In Synaptic (University of Regina Press, 2022) each section explores key themes in science, neurology, and perception. The first, Connectomics, riffs on scientific language to work with and against that language’s intentions. Attempting to map the brain’s neural connections, it raises fundamental questions about interiority and the self. The lyric considerations in these poems are juxtaposed against the scientific-like footnotes which, in turn, invoke questions undermining authority and power. The second section, Other Disasters, explores ways of seeing or and being seen, from considerations of folklore to modern art to daily life.
    Sine Yaganoglu trained as a neuroscientist and bioengineer (PhD, ETH Zurich). She currently works in innovation management and diagnostics.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    • 46 min
    Katharine Hodgson and Alexandra Smith, "Canonicity, Twentieth-Century Poetry and Russian National Identity After 1991" (Peter Lang, 2020)

    Katharine Hodgson and Alexandra Smith, "Canonicity, Twentieth-Century Poetry and Russian National Identity After 1991" (Peter Lang, 2020)

    The collapse of the Soviet Union forced Russia to engage in a process of nation building. This involved a reassessment of the past, both historical and cultural, and how it should be remembered. The publication of previously barely known underground and émigré literary works presented an opportunity to reappraise "official" Soviet literature and re-evaluate twentieth-century Russian literature as a whole. Katharine Hodgson and Alexandra Smith's book Canonicity, Twentieth-Century Poetry and Russian National Identity After 1991 (Peter Lang, 2020) explores changes to the poetry canon – an instrument for maintaining individual and collective memory – to show how cultural memory has informed the evolution of post-Soviet Russian identity. It examines how concerns over identity are shaping the canon, and in which directions, and analyses the interrelationship between national identity (whether ethnic, imperial, or civic) and attempts to revise the canon. 
    Canonicity, Twentieth-Century Poetry and Russian National Identity After 1991 situates the discussion of national identity within the cultural field and in the context of canon formation as a complex expression of aesthetic, political, and institutional factors. It encompasses a period of far-reaching upheaval in Russia and reveals the tension between a desire for change and a longing for stability that was expressed by attempts to reshape the literary canon and, by doing so, to create a new twentieth-century past and the foundations of a new identity for the nation.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    • 54 min
    Cynthia Parker-Ohene, "Daughters of Harriet: Poems" (UP of Colorado, 2022)

    Cynthia Parker-Ohene, "Daughters of Harriet: Poems" (UP of Colorado, 2022)

    Drawing inspiration from the life of Harriet Tubman, Cynthia Parker-Ohene's poetic narratives follow a historical arc of consciousness of Black folks: mislaid in potters' fields and catalogued with other misbegotten souls, now unsettled as the unknown Black denominator. Who loved them? Who turned them away? Who dismembered their souls? In death, they are the institutionalized marked Black bodies assigned to parcels, scourged beneath plastic sheets identified as a number among Harriets as black, marked bodies. These poems speak to how the warehousing of enslaved and somewhat free beings belies their humanity through past performances in reformatories, workhouses, and hospitals for the negro insane. To whom did their Black lives belong? How are Black grrls socialized within the family to be out in the world? What is the beingness of Black women? How have the Harriets--the descended daughters of Harriet Tubman--confronted issues of caste and multiple oppressions? The poems in Daughters of Harriet: Poems (UP of Colorado, 2022) give voice to the unspeakable, the unreachable, the multiple Black selves waiting to become.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    • 24 min
    Kim Hyun, "Glory Hole" (Seagull Books, 2022)

    Kim Hyun, "Glory Hole" (Seagull Books, 2022)

    In this episode, co-translators Suhyun J. Ahn and Archana Madhavan discuss their Korean-to-English translation of Glory Hole by Kim Hyun (Seagull Books, 2022). Released as part of The Pride List from The University of Chicago Press, Glory Hole is a fantastical collection of queer poems that are uncomfortable, bodily, fluid-filled, and delightfully puzzling to read.
    Across fifty-one bewildering poems, Kim both engages and confuses readers with puns, distorted retellings of American popular culture, dystopian landscapes, robots, and more, all to a relentlessly queer backdrop of longing and sexual desire. Tune in to hear Suhyun and Archana read some of their favorite translations from this collection, talk about their own journeys to translation and translating Glory Hole, and share the challenges and joys of bringing this work into the English language: the Korean wordplay that they reimagine in English; their collaborative process of making sense of these poems in both Korean and English; some favorite (and most frustrating) parts of the translation process, and more!
    Suhyun J. Ahn is a Korean-English translator who is pursuing a PhD in East Asian Studies at Princeton University.
    Archana Madhavan is a Korean-English translator who works a day job in tech.
    Jennifer Gayoung Lee is a writer and data analyst based in New York City.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    • 1 hr
    80 We are Not Digested: Rajiv Muhabir (Ulka Anjaria, JP)

    80 We are Not Digested: Rajiv Muhabir (Ulka Anjaria, JP)

    Rajiv Mohabir is a dazzling poet of linguistics crossovers, who works in English, Bhojpuri, Hindi and more. He is as prolific as he is polyglot (three books in 2021!) and has undertaken a remarkable array of projects includes the prizewinning resurrection of a forgotten century-old memoir about mass involuntary migration.
    He joined John and first-time host Ulka Anjaria (English prof, Bollywood expert and Director of the Brandeis Mandel Center for the Humanities) in the old purple RtB studio. During the conversation, Rajiv read and in one case sang poems from his wonderful recent books, Cutlish and Antiman.
    Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
    Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

MurasakiFloof ,

Plum

The guests are wonderful, wonderful ways to wage the hours of my days.

OaklandEd ,

Too much chatter.

The interviews are sloppy and informal with a good deal of meaningless chatter. It takes forever to get to meaningful content. I listened to two podcasts and felt I was wasting my time.

Top Podcasts In Arts

NPR
The Moth
Roman Mars
American Public Media
Book of the Month
Anne Bogel | Wondery

You Might Also Like

Poetry Foundation
Poetry Foundation
Poetry Foundation
London Review Bookshop
On Being Studios
The New York Times