19 episodes

New Voices is a podcast from the Extending New Narratives in the History of Philosophy Partnership, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. newnarrativesinphilosophy.net

This podcast consists of conversations about philosophers from groups that have been underrepresented and excluded in the history of European and Western philosophy: their views, what is interesting and unique about them, and how they fit in to the periods that they were apart of. We also talk about what it is actually like to learn about and promote these ideas as a philosopher today: what benefits there are, what challenges there are, and just how to get going on this work.

New Voices in the History of Philosophy Extending New Narratives in the History of Philosophy

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

New Voices is a podcast from the Extending New Narratives in the History of Philosophy Partnership, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. newnarrativesinphilosophy.net

This podcast consists of conversations about philosophers from groups that have been underrepresented and excluded in the history of European and Western philosophy: their views, what is interesting and unique about them, and how they fit in to the periods that they were apart of. We also talk about what it is actually like to learn about and promote these ideas as a philosopher today: what benefits there are, what challenges there are, and just how to get going on this work.

    Chinese Cosmopolitanism: Interview with Shuchen Xiang

    Chinese Cosmopolitanism: Interview with Shuchen Xiang

    In this episode, Haley speaks with Shuchen Xiang, professor of philosophy at Xidian University, about her new book, “Chinese Cosmopolitanism: The History and Philosophy of an Idea”. In discussing the book, we talk about historical Chinese accounts of a metaphysics of harmony, and how that metaphysics of harmony informs thinking about social identity and difference. We also discuss the aims and process of comparative philosophy.

    • 34 min
    Kant, Race, and Racism: Interview with Huaping Lu-Adler

    Kant, Race, and Racism: Interview with Huaping Lu-Adler

    In this episode, Haley speaks with Huaping Lu-Adler, associate professor of philosophy at Georgetown University, about her new book titled 'Kant, Race, and Racism: Views from Somewhere'. In the course of our conversation about the book, we discuss what it means to philosophize from a particular perspective, the compatibility of Kant's moral theory and his racist claims, the ways that our contemporary philosophical canon has its origins in Kant's writings, and the importance of community for philosophical work. 

    • 47 min
    Madeleine de Scudéry’s Illustrious Women: Interview with Allauren Samantha Forbes

    Madeleine de Scudéry’s Illustrious Women: Interview with Allauren Samantha Forbes

    In this episode, Olivia speaks with Allauren Samantha Forbes, an assistant professor in philosophy and gender and social justice at McMaster University. We discuss the thought of the French philosopher and novelist Madeleine de Scudéry, who lived from 1607 to 1701. Though historians of philosophy are most familiar with Scudéry for her later philosophical dialogues, our conversation focuses on an earlier publication: 1642’s Illustrious Women or Heroic Harangues. Allauren argues that this collection of fictional speeches by real women from antiquity – all of whom are limited in some way by hierarchical power structures – is an educational philosophical text that articulates various manifestations of patriarchal power and exemplifies ways of subverting it. We also talk about ideas for teaching Scudéry and Allauren’s own background as a philosopher working in the history of feminism.

    • 51 min
    Anton Wilhelm Amo: Interview with Dwight K. Lewis Jr.

    Anton Wilhelm Amo: Interview with Dwight K. Lewis Jr.

    In this episode, Haley speaks with Dwight K. Lewis Jr., assistant professor in the philosophy department at the University of Minnesota. We talk about the life and works of the 18th century philosopher Anton Wilhelm Amo, including his account of kinds of prejudice, and his views on justice as a tool and paradigm for reasoning. We also talk about the different contexts and manifestations of political resistance, and the need for varied mediums for philosophical ideas. 

    • 44 min
    Recovering Indigenous Andean Philosophy: Interview with Jorge Sanchez-Perez

    Recovering Indigenous Andean Philosophy: Interview with Jorge Sanchez-Perez

    In this episode, Olivia speaks with Jorge Sanchez-Perez, a former postdoctoral researcher in the Extending New Narratives in the History of Philosophy project who is currently an assistant professor in philosophy at the University of Alberta. We discuss Jorge’s postdoctoral work on the Huarochirí manuscript – one of the few surviving records of indigenous Andean philosophy in the Quechua language – and talk about the metaphysical ideas Jorge has worked to uncover in the text. Jorge also offers some advice for people interested in studying indigenous philosophy in an academic context that can sometimes be hostile to indigenous methodologies and traditions. 

    • 49 min
    Frederick Douglass’s Political Philosophy: Interview with Phil Yaure

    Frederick Douglass’s Political Philosophy: Interview with Phil Yaure

    In this episode, Olivia Branscum speaks with Phil Yaure – assistant professor of philosophy at Virginia Tech – about the political philosophy of Frederick Douglass. Douglass was born into slavery, but eventually became one of the most influential black abolitionists of the 19th century after escaping his enslaved condition and learning to read and write. Phil’s research focuses on Douglass as a political philosopher, with special concern for Douglass’s conception of the US constitution as an anti-slavery document and his belief that citizenship is a function of one’s contribution to a polity (in contrast to thinking of citizenship as a status that is conferred upon someone by the powers of the state). Phil argues that Douglass considers abolitionist resistance itself to be a way of contributing to American society, which leads to the conclusion that enslaved people fighting against the injustice of slavery make themselves American citizens in doing so. We also discuss the philosophical value of the autobiography genre, and Phil offers listeners some recommendations for where to begin if they want to incorporate Frederick Douglass into their history of philosophy courses. 

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Gaal Dornick ,

Extremely professional & informative

In the highest tier of philosophy podcasts: extremely professional (excellent editing and pretty good sound quality) and informative (top scholars sharing their work). Oh and no advertisements!

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

This American Life
iHeartPodcasts
Nick Viall
New York Times Opinion
Vox Media Podcast Network
Chris Williamson