100 episodes

Hi, I'm Nikhil Hogan, an entrepreneur, guitarist, pianist, and teacher. I'm a graduate (summa cum laude) of Berklee College of Music, and have been exploring music pedagogy and music education for many years. I'm a guitar and piano teacher with many years of experience under my belt.

After Berklee, I explored the Jazz Bebop pedagogy of Barry Harris. In 2018, I started the Nikhil Hogan Show, a podcast dedicated to interviewing great musicians of many styles. Through the podcast, I discovered the wonderful world of partimento, music schema theory, counterpoint, and thoroughbass. Generally, I am interested in talking to great musicians who are skilled in composing and improvisation.

Join me in my journey of surveying the best methods of music making and let's deepen our knowledge of music!

Nikhil Hogan Show Nikhil Hogan

    • Music
    • 5.0 • 23 Ratings

Hi, I'm Nikhil Hogan, an entrepreneur, guitarist, pianist, and teacher. I'm a graduate (summa cum laude) of Berklee College of Music, and have been exploring music pedagogy and music education for many years. I'm a guitar and piano teacher with many years of experience under my belt.

After Berklee, I explored the Jazz Bebop pedagogy of Barry Harris. In 2018, I started the Nikhil Hogan Show, a podcast dedicated to interviewing great musicians of many styles. Through the podcast, I discovered the wonderful world of partimento, music schema theory, counterpoint, and thoroughbass. Generally, I am interested in talking to great musicians who are skilled in composing and improvisation.

Join me in my journey of surveying the best methods of music making and let's deepen our knowledge of music!

    138: Nicholas Baragwanath

    138: Nicholas Baragwanath

    0:00 Start 
    1:34 How has the book, "The Solfeggio Tradition", been received? 6:43 Italian solfeggio explained in 4 minutes 
    11:41 Should children delay singing solfeggio until their voice has broken? 
    14:15 Did 18th-century plainsong sound more like galant music rather than medieval music? 
    16:10 What about Palestrina? 
    19:35 An example of a lesson in Italian solfeggio 
    22:33 How do you learn to accompany a melody line by sight with the correct harmony? 
    28:00 How do you follow the rules of counterpoint when switching between hexachords? 
    32:33 How do you know when there is a change of syllable vs a continuation of a melisma? 
    34:57 Does the appoggiatura take the target note's syllable or have its own? 
    36:20 Up 4th Down 5th Bass Motion in Italian Solfeggio 
    37:19 Mozart improvisation solfeggio lesson (K. 545) 
    41:19 Notation is the curse of the modern musician 
    48:02 Did Mozart know Italian solfeggio? 
    51:10 Why did the Germans complain about the Italians keeping solfeggio as a trade secret? 
    53:11 Were violinists like Paganini, Corelli and Vivaldi familiar with Italian solfeggio? 
    57:11 Did the Italian Maestros abandon teaching solfeggio syllables if the students struggled with pitch? 
    59:11 Did Italian solfeggio completely die out in the 19th-century? 
    1:00:49 Did Italian musicians think of the bass in terms of solfeggio syllables? 
    1:05:56 What was the 18th-century Italian understanding of Keys and Tonality? 
    1:09:02 What are good solfeggio manuscripts to practice to with and how much proportion of time is spent worrying about syllable placement vs actual singing? 
    1:12:10 Do we have access to 18th-century plainchant that doesn't sound like medieval music? 
    1:17:19 Is there any value to practicing solfeggi exercises with "Ah" even if we don't know which syllables to use? 
    1:18:45 What are your favorite solfeggi collections? 
    1:19:46 What's your opinion on Johann Fux and his method of teaching counterpoint? 
    1:21:19 What do you think of Nicola Sala's counterpoint treatise? 
    1:22:39 How does your solfeggio expertise inform the way you would teach partimento? 
    1:25:08 Are those manuals of singing by maestros who changed to Fixed Do still useful for learning diminution? 
    1:25:57 What's the state of Italian solfeggio research today?

    • 1 hr 31 min
    137 - Derek Remes

    137 - Derek Remes

    0:00 Intro
    0:36 Start
    1:58 What made you want to analyze Bach's 48 preludes?
    4:26 Every prelude in the book has been transposed to C or Am
    6:22 Is there one perfect analysis of Bach's compositions?
    8:30 "The Walled Park of Closely Related Keys"
    12:11 Would Bach go from C major directly to E minor?
    12:42 Bach's use of closely related keys in the preludes
    14:35 Looking at an example from the book 17:23 Talking about the nature of modulations in the 18th-century
    22:02 Is Bach a galant musician, old school, or a transitional figure?
    25:30 Do Heinichen and CPE Bach share any similarities in their systems of thoroughbass?
    35:42 What is Bach's typical behavior in employing satzmodelle (schema theory)?
    40:31 Is there anything controversial about your analysis of these preludes?
    42:57 What would you say to someone who analyzes music with roman numerals and harmonic function theory about your book?
    47:23 Which of the 48 preludes was the hardest to analyze?
    58:23 What's the best way to realizing figures correctly?
    1:04:40 How do you memorize all these rules of thoroughbass?
    1:09:54 Reading Furno and learning that music is composed of consonances and dissonances
    1:11:53 Does your interpretation of repertoire change from knowing thoroughbass?
    1:16:24 What is the state of music theory in music education, how has it changed?
    1:22:17 What future research would be good for thoroughbass?

    • 1 hr 29 min
    136: Peter Schubert

    136: Peter Schubert

    Professor Peter Schubert from McGill University returns to the show to discuss the republication of a new edition of his book, "Baroque Counterpoint."

    • 1 hr 24 min
    135: Eric Boaro

    135: Eric Boaro

    My guest today is Eric Boaro. He is the author of a very interesting article in Eighteenth-Century Music, called Evidence of the Practical Application of Solfeggio Patterns in the Manuscript for the 1707 Neapolitan Performance of La Fede Tradita E Vendicata by Gasparini and Vignola.

    • 1 hr 13 min
    134: Robert Gjerdingen and Giorgio Sanguinetti

    134: Robert Gjerdingen and Giorgio Sanguinetti

    I’m very excited to welcome two very special guests to the program, Professor Robert Gjerdingen and Professor Giorgio Sanguinetti. Professor Gjerdingen is the author of Music in the Galant Style and Child Composers, while Professor Sanguinetti is the author of The Art of Partimento”. They join me today for a group table discussion on partimento, music education, music history, and much more.

    • 1 hr 37 min
    133: Patrick Ayrton

    133: Patrick Ayrton

    My guest today is conductor, harpsichordist, and organist, Professor Patrick Ayrton. He currently teaches thoroughbass, chamber music, and improvisation at the Royal Conservatory of the Hague.

    • 1 hr 54 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

cwpvik ,

Such a helpful podcast!

I love podcasts like this that introduce you to ideas and concepts that would be difficult to come by on your own, and then points you in a direction to learn more (it’s what I was hoping grad school was going to be like!). In part, it’s because the guests are so interesting, but also because the host prepares so incredibly well for each guest — which in turn helps us the listeners receive so much from each episode (and keeps us coming back.) Thanks for this podcast, it’s fantastic!

Partimento ,

great podcast, learned a lot

This is a very important podcast that has opened up a world of music to me. But I wish the comments were open because I’d like to discuss the topics covered in the episodes and ask some questions and stuff.

KyleDickersonComposer ,

Great podcast

Interesting topics, well researched, good interviewer.

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