135 episodes

Note To Future Me is dedicated to interviewing businesses and organizations who have implemented podcasting into their marketing strategy.

Brett Johnson is the owner and lead consultant at Circle270Media Podcast Consultants. With over 35+ years of experience in Marketing, Content Creation, Audio Production/Recording and Broadcasting, the podcast consultants at Circle270Media strategically bring these strengths together for their business Podcast clients.

Subscribe to my free Open The Mic Newsletter at https://www.getrevue.co/profile/c270m. It's chock full of podcast news you may have missed, as well as social media, sales, and audio production tips, as well as insights on how to grow your podcast. Anything that catches my eye that I think you, the Podcaster, should know about.

Email us at podcasts @circle270media.com to set up time to talk more about your new or established business podcast.

Me - Brett Johnson
Web - https://www.circle270media.com
Web - https://www.notetofutureme.com
LinkedIn - bretthjohnson
FB - circle270media
Twitter - circle270media

Why write a note to myself, when I can pod-journal my thoughts about podcasting?!

Note To Future Me Circle270Media Podcast Consultants

    • Marketing
    • 4.3, 4 Ratings

Note To Future Me is dedicated to interviewing businesses and organizations who have implemented podcasting into their marketing strategy.

Brett Johnson is the owner and lead consultant at Circle270Media Podcast Consultants. With over 35+ years of experience in Marketing, Content Creation, Audio Production/Recording and Broadcasting, the podcast consultants at Circle270Media strategically bring these strengths together for their business Podcast clients.

Subscribe to my free Open The Mic Newsletter at https://www.getrevue.co/profile/c270m. It's chock full of podcast news you may have missed, as well as social media, sales, and audio production tips, as well as insights on how to grow your podcast. Anything that catches my eye that I think you, the Podcaster, should know about.

Email us at podcasts @circle270media.com to set up time to talk more about your new or established business podcast.

Me - Brett Johnson
Web - https://www.circle270media.com
Web - https://www.notetofutureme.com
LinkedIn - bretthjohnson
FB - circle270media
Twitter - circle270media

Why write a note to myself, when I can pod-journal my thoughts about podcasting?!

    Podcast Challenges

    Podcast Challenges

    Challenges


    Over the last 30 days of my 31 day challenge to produce and publish a podcast every day, I really started thinking about the term “challenge.” And it’s various meanings (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/challenge) …


    1 : an objection to something as not being true, genuine, correct, or proper or to a person (as a juror) as not being correct, qualified, or approved. 


    2 : a call or dare for someone to compete in a contest or sport. 


    3 : a difficult task or problem.


    What are some of your challenges with podcasting? I took a look at some podcasting Facebook groups to get a look at what their challenges are for the next 30 days...


    Wind things down, go on a bit of a hiatus and maybe start doing work for others.


    To slow down to 1 episode a month and really log some serious hours fishing.


    Launch!


    To record more podcasts.


    We have some big guests coming on and very excited about it.


    Increase following


    At the end of the month I hit my 15 year podcasting anniversary.


    2000 DL


    Gain more listeners and get me interviews lined up


    Increase FB Group to 300 Members! Start an E-mail list giving away free value. Grow listens from 100 to 300


    Figure out the tech to do interview podcast from my home studio


    To start my Season 2. I’ve been on hiatus


    Buy the rode podcaster, collaborate with more podcasters, find ways to feedback and engagement with our listeners


    Starting my 3rd season this month and my goals are to improve my audio editing skills.


    Interview a guest we’ve been dying to have!


    Content planning and outlines for the next 10 episodes


    Master Audacity


    New gear


    Get a new website and hosting setup so I can split my feed into the two shows it’s become


    To hit 50 reviews


    To be a guest on more podcasts


    What are your challenges in the next 30 days - are you challenging yourself, or is the challenge to start or to grow your business podcast. 


    Let’s talk more about it. 


    I am available Thursday and Fridays.  I have a link in the episode notes that you can use to book a free consultation session. (https://bookme.name/Circle270Media/lite/lets-find-out-what-you-need)


    Recorded in Studio C at Channel 511 (https://my.captivate.fm/www.channel511.com) , in the Brewery District, downtown Columbus, OH.


    Brett Johnson is the owner and lead consultant at Circle270Media Podcast Consultants (https://my.captivate.fm/www.circle270media.com) . With over 35+ years of experience in Marketing, Content Creation, Audio Production/Recording and Broadcasting, the podcast consultants at Circle270Media strategically bring these strengths together for their business Podcast clients.


    Subscribe to my free daily Open The Mic Newsletter at www.circle270media.com. It's chock full of podcast news you may have missed, as well as social media, sales, and audio production tips, and insights on how to grow your business podcast.


    If your business is using podcasting as a marketing or branding tool, I would love to showcase your podcast. Go to www.notetofutureme.com (https://my.captivate.fm/www.notetofutureme.com) and scroll down to my booking calendar.


    Email us at podcasts@circle270media.com to set up time to talk more about your new or established business podcast.


    www.circle270media.com


    www.notetofutureme.com


    Me - Brett Johnson


    LinkedIn - bretthjohnson


    FB - circle270media


    Twitter - circle270media


    I want to thank ArchesAudio dot com for the music you're hearing. They provide audio to podcasters for free as long as you give them some accreditation in verbally in your podcast as well on the show podcast notes.

    • 2 min
    Options for Recording Remote Interviews

    Options for Recording Remote Interviews

    Podcasters have a great variety of software to record podcasts and interviews remotely. 


    The options we have available are probably the best that podcasters have ever seen and experienced. 


    This is day 30 of my 31 Day Podcast Challenge.


    I have put together a list of possible options that usually offer free initial trial periods, or free versions, and premium offerings as well. 


    Circle270Media Podcast Consultants has not tested all of the alternatives below. We see posts and comments in online communities that are good and critical with each of these. 


    Though, still be aware, that using these tools aren’t necessarily going to give you high quality audio. You may still have to do some post-production sound quality editing. These are still better options than the usual go-to web conferencing tools, like Zoom, for podcasting purposes.


    Be sure you ask around and test for yourself. Most of them have demo videos to watch. With each having their own specific uniqueness, kick the tires to see which recording platform will work best for your podcast.


    (https://squadcast.fm/) – SquadCast allows podcasters to schedule the interview. You can record everyone’s audio in separate .WAV files without drift. 


    (https://clearcast.io/) - ClearCast.io was founded out of a frustration that Art of Manliness Podcast host Brett McKay had with his remote interviews via Skype. Oftentimes, he’d experience lag, static, or cut off audio from his guest’s end of the conversation. Chrome and Firefox browsers only at this time.


    (https://riverside.fm/) - Record your podcast's audio AND video locally. Separate audio and video tracks for each guest. Livestream it to YouTube/Facebook/Twitter. Let your listeners call in via video.


    (https://zencastr.com/) – Zencastr works in your browser. All you have to do is send a link to your guests and hit record. Their audio will be recorded on their end before it gets compressed and garbled. It is then automatically streamed to your Dropbox account. 


    (https://cleanfeed.net/) – Cleanfeed is an online service that uses the Opus audio codec and the Chrome browser to allow for ISDN quality with one or multiple co-hosts and interviews. Cleanfeed can record your sessions and deliver two separate tracks on a single .WAV file.


    (https://www.bswusa.com/Podcasting-Rode-Rodecaster-Pro-P14002.aspx) – The RODEcaster Pro is worth the investment if you have the option. It makes it very easy to integrate remote interviews of all kinds (like Zencastr). Mobile devices can easily be connected via TRRS cable or Bluetooth, allowing calls to be either recorded and stored for later use or streamed on-the-fly during a podcast. It automatically provides a mix-minus too. 


    (https://tryca.st/) – Cast manages a live call between you and your guests, allows you to chat with your guests, mute yourself, and make private notes that only you can see. In the background, Cast streams a high-fidelity audio recording for each participant to the cloud, where they store it for mixing in the Cast Editor or for download on your Account page. 


    (https://streamyard.com/) – StreamYard is a live streaming studio in your browser. It allows you to interview guests, share your screen, and much more. You have the option to stream directly to your social media channels. 


    (https://www.uberconference.com/) – Podcasters can record an interview call one of two ways: through the web or over the phone. Keep in mind that UberConference only records your conference audio – not your screen share. 


    (https://www.ringr.com/) – Ringr lets you invite a guest (or multiple guests) to a call. Invited users can join the call on their desktop or by downloading a mobile app. When you schedule a call, you and your guests will both get a calendar invite. As soon as they connect to the call, you can start talking to each oth

    • 5 min
    Podcast Reviews are Social Proof

    Podcast Reviews are Social Proof

    Consumers are influenced by other people more than they realize (or are willing to admit).


    According to the (http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704436004576298962165925364) , social norms influence consumption behavior and even private interests, including one’s taste in music and even podcasts. 


    This is what makes the concept of social proof a powerful one. 


    This is Day 29 of my 31 Day Podcast Challenge


    What is social proof?


    Sourcing Wikipedia...


    Social proof, a term coined by social (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social) phenomenon wherein people copy the actions of others in an attempt to undertake behavior in a given situation.


    Simply put, social proof influences people's decisions on how they should behave. 


    Online reviews have significant effects on our behaviors. They've emerged as one of the most potent forms of social proof.


     Do reviews really guide purchase decisions?People take positive reviews and high ratings as social proof of a product or service, or for this podcast episode topic, a podcast that is worth subscribing to. They reason, “This has great reviews, so I’m subscribing to it.”


    Apart from providing social proof for podcast listeners looking to find a new podcast to subscribe to, reviews also provide social proof in other ways. These online testimonials shape how people perceive the podcast.


    But just how important are in-app ratings and reviews? Do they really help your podcast’s visibility? Or are these CTAs just ego-driven tactics that help you climb up the Apple Podcasts rankings? 


    We hate to burst your bubble, but reviews won’t change your rankings in the least. It’s not part of Apple Podcasts ranking algorithm. At Circle270Media Podcast Consultants, we believe ratings and reviews are always worth asking for… even if they don’t factor into an app’s discovery algorithm.


    Why? Because ratings and reviews are, yes, social proof (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_proof) .


    Harnessing the potential of reviews as social proof is about activating happy podcast listeners. Keeping that in mind, here are some equally important tips on maximizing social proof in positive reviews:


    Encourage written reviews, not just star ratingsReviews require words that can help form a more complete picture of a podcast for potential new listeners. A good review will help fill in the gaps of what a podcaster says about their own podcast content.


    Say thank you and engage 


    If a listener took the time to present social proof for other potential listeners to see, expressing your gratitude is the very least you can do. In Apple Podcasts, you can’t respond back to the listeners, but you can give them a shout out in upcoming podcast episodes, or your newsletter, or on your social media channels.


    Ask for the review


    Here’s where your creativity needs to shine. Yes, a review in Apple Podcasts, or other in-app players, is the initial ask. But can you do more with your call-to-action?  


    Ask your audience to directly send a note to the show via email. It could be written, or even better, a voice memo. Use those reviews by placing them into your podcast press kit or testimonials on your show’s website. This method makes it extremely easy for a listener to connect with a show, and it will start to build a relationship between you and your reviewers.


    Ask if they can encourage one of their friends to subscribe to the podcast. Ask them to subscribe to your newsletter. Ask them to follow you on your social media channel(s). 


    Here’s the bottom line. Ratings and reviews are a valuable way to understand how your audience feels about your show.


    Podcast ratings and reviews matter because they’re social proof. They are a part of your podcast’s packaging.


    If you would like to help your listeners leave a review on Apple Podcasts, we do have a simple

    • 4 min
    Reasons Why Your Business Should Start A Podcast

    Reasons Why Your Business Should Start A Podcast

    You handle the marketing for your company. You’re thinking about starting a company podcast but you haven’t got round to doing it yet.  


    Why? 


    Don’t know quite where to start the conversation in the next marketing meeting?


    This is day 28 of my 31 Day Podcast Challenge.


    Here are three great reasons why this form of audio content is just what your business’s content strategy needs.Podcasts make marketing sense. Fewer people are reading. More people spend more time mobile devices, which means you need to adapt your content strategy to cater to these changes. 


    And when done right, this easily shareable content will allow your business’s message to reach your targeted audience.


    Podcasts can be listened to anywhere and anytime. How people consume content is changing. People are watching less TV and switching to online platforms. And most people don’t have time to read articles. All this means it’s getting harder and harder to reach potential customers. 


    Podcasts are quick and easy to consume. But what further sets them apart is that they don’t require undivided attention.


    Here’s a quote from Chris Drucker (http://www.chrisducker.com/starting-a-podcast/) from his blog. He writes about the speed appeal of podcasts: 


    ‘The average blog posts is approximately 700-words, which can be read in about 5-minutes. However, the average podcast is 35-minutes which translates into 4,550 words, the equivalent of 6.5 blog posts.’


    Podcasts slip easily into our daily lives. This will be appealing to your targeted audience. Your customers need content they can listen to while doing other tasks. Time is a precious commodity and podcasts provide businesses with a way to effectively reach consumers while doing other activities.


    This means that your opportunity to reach your consumer is limitless. 


    You Can Sway Your Consumers DecisionsPodcasts allow your business to develop a personality and a voice. This is a powerful tool when seeking to influence your target consumers' decisions. 


    A podcast confirms your brand’s identity and becomes a valid source of information.


    Once you’ve built this relationship of trust with your customers, you’ll be able to influence them during decision-making processes.


    Podcasts have a long and indefinite shelf life. When good content is created, you are creating company advertising with no time limit. It also means that old customers will return to your brand for information, and new ones will seek you out.


    Podcasts aren’t a one-time creation. Once you’ve published them, they are available in your podcast library of episodes, indefinitely. They will have a similar shelf life to evergreen content—so long as you’re choosing topics with an intent to last.


    This means you need to plan each piece of content carefully. Be prepared to adjust your content depending on how it’s received by your listeners. Make sure you continue to be seen as a reliable information source.


    As the number of people listening to podcasts rapidly increases, it makes sense to tap into this market for your business.


    Podcasts make economical sense. They require minimal investment and technology to get started. That’s why Circle270Media Podcast Consultants have been an important ally to all of our clients 


    Once integrated into your content marketing plan, they allow you to reach a wider customer base. This medium is also perfect to target and reach niche audiences.


    The main resource required is your time, to ensure that the content you produce is worth listening to for years to come.


    The list of businesses who have incorporated podcasting into their content marketing strategy continues to grow month after month. Even smaller businesses are tapping into the medium to reach greater audiences and increase profits. 


    If you haven’t already begun podcasting, consider

    • 4 min
    Planning Your Podcast Script

    Planning Your Podcast Script

    A big question that comes up with our new clients is whether you should or shouldn’t plan your podcast script. 


    We look at it a couple of different ways.


    Scripted podcasts can make speech feel stiff and rehearsed. 


    Scripted podcasts can be the key to being confident, concise and keeping the content flowing.


    I always answer that question this way. At the bare minimum, plan out your podcast episode. It’s impossible to create great content without some sort of planning. 


    Even podcasts which sound ad-libbed are scripted and rehearsed to some level. 


    But, don’t think that you need to write out a rigid script which you follow word for word. That may be the worst thing you can do, especially if you don’t have the experience to read from a script like you are presenting a conversation-like recording. 


    You can create a script map, or call it an agenda, which gives you pointers and leads you through your topics. And keeps you on track. 


    The power of planning is that it ensures your podcast episode hooks listeners and keeps you focused.


    Create A Clear SummaryAt the start, you need to look at what the main ideas and themes you want to cover during your podcast episode. 


    Start by getting the central ideas down on paper. Use them to branch out into smaller subcategories. A great way of doing this is by mind mapping.


    A mind map is a tool for the brain that captures the thinking that goes on inside your head. Mind mapping helps you think, collect knowledge, remember and create ideas. Most likely it will make you a better thinker.


    A good starting point on how to mind map is found at https://simplemind.eu/how-to-mind-map/basics/ (https://simplemind.eu/how-to-mind-map/basics/)


    Mind mapping lets you work quickly and organically, without planning as you go. This allows you to come back later to structure your content.  


    The Trello app can be a great tool to help you collect all your thoughts in one place, and collect outside graphs, photos, and links.


    Write How You Talk, Not SpeakOnce you have your ideas clear, get down to the writing. 


    The most important factor is to write using your stream of consciousness and edit afterwards. 


    Keep in mind whether you’re writing for yourself or someone else, like your co-host. Write clearly and concisely.  


    This will come to you easier as you create each episode. You will begin to learn your co-host(s) speaking patterns and presentation manners.  


    Make It Your StyleWhile you’re reworking your script, remember that you have a very short window in which to grab listeners attention. Your intro should pack a punch and immediately deliver your podcast’s personality and style.


    There is a great Medium article from Michelle Prak entitled Enough With The Chit Chat (https://medium.com/@michellejprak/enough-with-the-chitchat-8ad9cc8d94c0) .


    "Do you need your podcast host to warm things up with chit chat? Perhaps for some listeners, it seems more relatable and personable. Maybe, to do anything else would be ‘rude’ or too blunt."


    I posted this on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6692051691002499072/) , and quite a few comments followed about how this is a turnoff for most of them. 


    Watch how you start your podcast. Done without the listener in mind, It could be the end of your podcast growth. 


    This is part of your style of podcast. Keep the listener in mind first. You literally have seconds to convince your audience you’re worth listening to.


    Give your podcast character and individuality, but it’s about respecting the listener. Create a bond between you and listeners; write with a friendly style and avoid anything which could cause listeners to lose interest.


    Refine It and Read It Out LoudThe final step in getting your podcast ready for recording is refining it until you feel confident...

    • 4 min
    Why You Need Great Podcast Show Notes

    Why You Need Great Podcast Show Notes

    Podcast show notes are one of those tasks that you KNOW is essential, but you can never bring yourself to doing it, or doing it properly. This may be, and probably is, because you’ve never been told how important they are to using the power of Google.


    This is day 26 of my 31 Day Podcast Challenge


    Podcast show notes are nothing more than a blog post with an audio file attached. 


    And they're also so much more than that. 


    Show notes serve three main purposesThe first two serve existing listeners:


    1 - To offer a summary of the episode’s content – to persuade someone to listen, to remind a previous listener what was covered, and to offer easy reminders about what the episode is about to share with their friends, your potential new listeners.


    2 - To offer links to resources, people or products that were mentioned. 


    The last serves you, and those who have yet to listen:


    3 - To attract new listeners through search traffic.


    That last one is the one most podcasters neglect, and is the most important part of creating great show notes. 


    Many podcasters write up show notes that are nothing more than a very quick introduction paragraph, and then a list of the resources that were mentioned. 


    That just serves your listener, covering #1 and #2. 


    But, if that's all you do, you're missing an opportunity to grow your audience.


    A good set of show notes can attract potential new listeners when they appear in search results.


    How do you do that?


    Write a blog post that covers the same topic as the podcastThat blog post is a written version of the show. Not necessarily a direct transcript, but something created to be read. A transcript can be used to help write the blog, to help find specific details or “pull quotes” you need to include in the blog. 


    It contains the same valuable information as the podcast, and encourages readers: “If you liked this, then listen to the podcast episode for even more.”


    Some people just can't find the time to do full blog-post style show notes every week. 


    An alternative is to keep them short and forget about the search engine benefits. Just do a 50 word intro paragraph and then some resource links and related descriptions. 


    Keep in mind, the long blog-post style format offers a lot more value in terms of content marketing. 


    The show notes, acting like blog articles, will start to gain traffic. They’re much more likely to be found and indexed in search results. As I like to say, you’re giving each episode as much “Google juice” as you can.


    Can transcripts make great show notes?If you're short on time, it’s worth considering transcriptions. You can pay around $1 per minute to have a full transcription done of any show. Some transcription services to consider are (https://sonix.ai/invite/mqppxdq) and Trint.


    As a bonus, they provide search engine friendly content for your website with little extra time effort. Just a bit of cost.


    Beware though, the spoken word, especially unscripted or without an outline, often doesn't transcribe well. Unedited transcriptions can often be long and rambling. 


    Most transcription services offer an additional charge to “clean” up your transcription so it's in better shape to use, or edit further for your own use as you see fit.


    If you don't have the time, or simply don't want to do your own podcast show notes, then you might want to outsource them altogether. If that's the case, then we recommend (https://www.linkedin.com/in/deborah-waltenburg-91b5b99b?lipi=urn%3Ali%3Apage%3Ad_flagship3_profile_view_base_contact_details%3BxJkGjVUZS%2BWce9Xz%2BFPKFQ%3D%3D) .


    Recorded in Studio C at Channel 511 (https://my.captivate.fm/www.channel511.com) , in the Brewery District, downtown Columbus, OH.


    Brett Johnson is the owner and lead consultant at Circle270Media Podcast Consultants (https://my.captivate.fm/ww

    • 3 min

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