24 episodes

Conversations with scholars on the life, times, music, and legacy of J.S. Bach, sponsored by Bach Society Houston.

Notes on Bach Carrie Allen Tipton

    • Music
    • 3.9, 12 Ratings

Conversations with scholars on the life, times, music, and legacy of J.S. Bach, sponsored by Bach Society Houston.

    Resurrection, Community, and Song in 16th-Century Europe

    Resurrection, Community, and Song in 16th-Century Europe

    To finish Season 4, we hear from Dr. Erin Lambert, Associate Professor of History at the University of Virginia. She joins us to talk about her book, Singing the Resurrection: Body, Community, and Belief in Reformation Europe, published by Oxford University Press. Our conversation covers how the Reformation fragmented late medieval belief about the body, resurrection, and community into a kaleidoscope of differing confessional notions which then found expression in song. We also talk about Erin’s research process and where her book fits with, and how it interrogates, existing Reformation historiography.

    • 34 min
    Sara Levy and the Music of the Bach Family

    Sara Levy and the Music of the Bach Family

    This month, we're diving into the world of Jewish salon culture in late-18th- and early-19th-century Berlin, a setting where women such as Sara Levy shaped the transmission and reception of Bach family music. Our guest on this episode is early music scholar and performer Dr. Rebecca Cypess, who joins us to discuss new research about Sara Levy in the book Sara Levy's World along with two related recordings by the Raritan Players: In Sara Levy's Salon and Sisters, Face to Face: The Bach Legacy in Women's Hands. Together, these projects provide new perspectives on the complicated musical and cultural agency of a notable upper-class Jewish woman in Enlightenment Germany.

    • 40 min
    A New Harpsichord Companion

    A New Harpsichord Companion

    If you can identify the sound of the harpsichord but know very little about its history and performance practice, this is the episode for you. Join us as Mark Kroll, internationally-known harpsichordist, noted scholar, and Emeritus Professor of Music at Boston University, tells us about a comprehensive new book on the harpsichord, the Cambridge Companion to the Harpsichord. Kroll edited the collection, which includes essays covering various national/geographical harpsichord traditions, key composers for the instrument, and 20th-century harpsichord music. Houston listeners who plan on attending Bach Society Houston's upcoming concert of Bach's Concertos, which includes the harpsichord showpiece Brandenburg No. 5, will be especially interested in this episode. 

    • 55 min
    A Crash Course on the Pipe Organ

    A Crash Course on the Pipe Organ

    People often hear the pipe organ more in December than in other months, thanks to the profusion of Christmas-centered church services and concerts. Here to give us a "crash course" on this mighty instrument--its anatomy and its history in various geographical regions--is noted U.S. organ consultant, restorer, and builder John Bishop, owner of John Bishop Organ Consultation. He is also the Executive Director of the Organ Clearing House, whose mission is to "rehome" unused or unwanted organs. Additionally, John writes a monthly column for the organ journal The Diapason.  
    Other organ resources, including videos of historic organs that John selected for us: 
    Gwendolyn Toth plays Scheidemann on the 1457 organ at Rysum


     
    Visit to the oldest organ in Holland, Oosthuizen, 1521
     
    Considered the oldest organ in the world, Sion Switzerland, 1390. This one is especially charming because Guy Bovet playing the music of Haydn (1730-1809). The organ is nearly 400 years older than the music.
    Vox Humana, a web magazine of current organ research/trends
     
     

    • 41 min
    Music and Society in Baroque Germany

    Music and Society in Baroque Germany

    This month, we hear from Dr. Tanya Kevorkian, Associate Professor of History at Millersville University. She joins us to discuss her research into sacred and secular musical life in Baroque Germany and helps us understand Bach's place in the complex social hierarchies that ordered early modern Germany. Our wide-ranging conversation covers two of Dr. Kevorkian's books: Baroque Piety: Religion, Society, and Music in Leipzig, 1650-1750 and Weddings, Rumbles, and Tower Guards: Music and Urban Life in Baroque Germany, forthcoming in 2021 from the University of Virginia Press. 
     

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Bach in Australia

    Bach in Australia

    To kick off our 2019-2020 Notes on Bach season, we hear from Dr. Samantha Owens, Professor of Musicology at Victoria University Wellington. She joins us to discuss a recent collection of essays that she co-edited, J.S. Bach in Australia: Studies in Reception and Performance, available from Lyrebird Press/University of Melbourne in paperback or as an e-book. 
    In the episode, we talk about how European colonists and immigrants spread Bach's music to Australia. We hear about some of the people and institutions who helped create a uniquely Australian Bach culture, along with challenges they faced in mounting performances of Bach's St. Matthew Passion and B Minor Mass in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
    Dr. Owens also tells us about the current robust early music scene in Australia, including organizations such as the Australian Bach Society and the Orchestra of the Antipodes. If you've never thought much about Bach performance and reception outside of a European geographical context, this episode is for you!

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

BruHan72 ,

"Problematic" podcast

Was pretty disappointed in the "Hearing Bach in the 21st Century" episode. The conversation seemed to be mostly intent on criticizing an unknown straw man who evidently sometimes reads spiritual meanings in Bach's music that aren't there. The horror! When they finally got around to analyzing the Mass, the guest just said that some movements are in an older style, and some are in a newer style. No examples, no musical excerpts, he didn't even say which movement was which. Would prefer a podcast more intent on building up than on deconstructing.

Narnianfan ,

A Great Podcast Find 🎶

Refreshing and Enjoyable!
Thank you 😊

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