698 episodes

In need of a good read? Or just want to keep up with the books everyone's talking about? NPR's Book of the Day gives you today's very best writing in a snackable, skimmable, pocket-sized podcast. Whether you're looking to engage with the big questions of our times – or temporarily escape from them – we've got an author who will speak to you, all genres, mood and writing styles included. Catch today's great books in 15 minutes or less.

NPR's Book of the Day NPR's Book of the Day

    • Arts
    • 4.3 • 421 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

In need of a good read? Or just want to keep up with the books everyone's talking about? NPR's Book of the Day gives you today's very best writing in a snackable, skimmable, pocket-sized podcast. Whether you're looking to engage with the big questions of our times – or temporarily escape from them – we've got an author who will speak to you, all genres, mood and writing styles included. Catch today's great books in 15 minutes or less.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    'The Alternatives' is a novel about grief, sisterhood and working women

    'The Alternatives' is a novel about grief, sisterhood and working women

    Caoilinn Hughes' novel The Alternatives revolves around the four Flattery sisters, each with a more impressive career or degree than the last, all with a profound grief for the parents they lost at a young age. When one of the sisters purposely goes off the grid, the other three are reunited in the Irish countryside in an attempt to find her. In today's episode, NPR's Andrew Limbong asks Hughes about crafting the witty dialogue between the sisters, writing side characters that jump off the page and getting feedback from her own siblings.

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    • 7 min
    Brittney Griner's memoir recounts her detention in Russia and finally 'Coming Home'

    Brittney Griner's memoir recounts her detention in Russia and finally 'Coming Home'

    In 2022, WNBA star Brittney Griner was detained by Russian authorities, convicted of drug charges and given a nine-year prison sentence. Her new memoir, Coming Home, details the conditions she was held in and her eventual return to the U.S. following a swap deal. In today's episode, NPR's Juana Summers asks Griner about the mental and physical toll she's still grappling with, reuniting with her wife and trying to forgive herself for what happened.

    To listen to Book of the Day sponsor-free and support NPR's book coverage, sign up for Book of the Day+ at plus.npr.org/bookoftheday

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    • 13 min
    'Lessons for Survival' thinks about parenting through social and environmental crises

    'Lessons for Survival' thinks about parenting through social and environmental crises

    As a parent, how do you navigate – and feel hope – raising kids through a pandemic, a climate crisis and with police brutality in the news? That's the question at the center of Emily Raboteau's new book, Lessons for Survival: Mothering Against 'The Apocalypse.' In today's episode, Raboteau tells Here & Now's Celeste Headlee what she learned about radical care, resilience and interdependence through the people she met in her community and in her travels, and how she thinks about parenting through personal and global hardships.

    To listen to Book of the Day sponsor-free and support NPR's book coverage, sign up for Book of the Day+ at plus.npr.org/bookoftheday

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    • 10 min
    Colm Tóibín's long-anticipated sequel to 'Brooklyn' is 'Long Island'

    Colm Tóibín's long-anticipated sequel to 'Brooklyn' is 'Long Island'

    The writer Colm Tóibín says he never meant to write a sequel to his 2009 novel Brooklyn. But an image came to him years later, of his protagonist from that book suddenly finding out her husband has had an affair that resulted in a pregnancy — and so he followed the story in Long Island. In today's episode, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Tóibín about revisiting Eilis Lacey in her 40s and upending her domestic life.

    To listen to Book of the Day sponsor-free and support NPR's book coverage, sign up for Book of the Day+ at plus.npr.org/bookoftheday

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    • 8 min
    Chanel Miller's new children's book follows lost socks in New York City

    Chanel Miller's new children's book follows lost socks in New York City

    Chanel Miller's first book was a critically acclaimed memoir about her sexual assault and the following trial. But she always wanted to write and illustrate books for kids. In today's episode, Miller tells NPR's Andrew Limbong how moving to New York City and ingraining herself into her community inspired Magnolia Wu Unfolds It All, a new book about a young girl and her BFF traversing their neighborhood to return socks that were left behind at the laundromat to their owners.

    To listen to Book of the Day sponsor-free and support NPR's book coverage, sign up for Book of the Day+ at plus.npr.org/bookoftheday

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    • 15 min
    Rachel Khong's new novel explores who gets to be 'Real Americans'

    Rachel Khong's new novel explores who gets to be 'Real Americans'

    Real Americans, the new novel by Rachel Khong, spans generations and decades within a family to understand the ongoing struggle to make sense of race, class and identity in the United States. Like with any family story, there are secrets and confrontations and difficult conversations, too; that desire to fill in the gaps about where we come from and how it has shaped our lineage is at the center of today's interview with Khong and NPR's Juana Summers.

    To listen to Book of the Day sponsor-free and support NPR's book coverage, sign up for Book of the Day+ at plus.npr.org/bookoftheday

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    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
421 Ratings

421 Ratings

Maggiemae4567.89 ,

Unbiased?

I listen to maybe 3-4 episodes a week and have for a year or so. I have read many a book based on their recommendations. I would recommend this podcast but it IS biased left or progressive. I would like to see it less focused on minorities opinions because npr was too white for awhile. I said it. As a biracial American. I am left, I vote progressive. But we cannot exist in a bubble in an echo chamber, Correct? Do what is right and have more diverse opinions on. And that does not mean every minority that punishes a book. Cause that’s how it feels at times. From a loyal listener. Thank you.

Jelly & Jam ,

A different book a day

I love the quick nature of this podcast. The variety of books is amazing, with both fiction, non fiction, and young adult included. The author is asked a few questions about their book and in a few minutes you can find if that is a book you want to read. I often find the current book I wanted to know a little more about in NPR’s selection of interviews. I recommend this podcast, if you’re a book reader. (Regarding another comment before mine…not sure how this podcast could be considered left leaning” but it certainly is not that).

yooperchicks ,

Liberal dribble

Maggiemae is correct and truthful. This is NPR, the social justice network. Books are diverse, NPR is not.

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