1 hr 39 min

Nutrition in Neuroscience Part 2 | Mastering Nutrition #41 Mastering Nutrition

    • Nutrition

Part 2 of how NUTRITION has a HUGE impact on your BRAIN!


Everything in your brain is something you ate, something you made from something you ate, or, in a few cases, something your mother ate. Nutrition impacts your mental and emotional health, the function of your five senses, and your conscious and unconscious control over your body movements.


Join me as I lead you in a safari through the textbook, “Neuroscience,” pointing out along the way all the interesting connections to nutrition. Listen in for part 2 on the NEUROTRANSMITTERS!

0:00:37     Cliff Notes 0:04:15     Overview of neurotransmitters 0:06:55     Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. 0:14:08      De novo glutamate in the central nervous system is overwhelmingly made from glucose. 0:16:55     Ketogenic diet for epilepsy 0:20:12    Glutamate metabolism 0:23:42    There are two classes of glutamate receptors: ionotropic and metabotropic. 0:24:45     There are three classes of metabotropic glutamate receptors, their actions are complex and variable, and they can be excitatory or inhibitory. 0:25:05     The ionotropic glutamate receptors include AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and kainite receptors, all of which have a depolarizing effect by allowing sodium and potassium to flow freely through them. 0:27:47     Four unique things about the NMDA receptor: magnesium is required to block its ion channel, it’s important for coincidence detection, it allows calcium to come into the cell, and it has a glycine-binding site. 0:33:16     Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are important for forming memories, and glutamate receptors play an important role. 0:40:48     GABA and glycine are the two primary inhibitory neurotransmitters of the central nervous system. 0:44:04     GABA and presumably glycine can be stimulatory if there is more chloride on the inside of the neuron than the outside. 0:48:53     Evidence that GABA might cross the blood-brain barrier 0:51:44     GABA in foods 0:54:14     GABA metabolism in the nervous system 0:56:08     Glycine 1:02:02     Acetylcholine 1:07:50     The biogenic amines include histamine, serotonin, and the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). 1:08:30     Synthesis of the catecholamines 1:10:46     Dopamine 1:14:08     Norepinephrine 1:16:32     Histamine 1:20:15     Serotonin 1:23:10     ATP and adenosine 1:26:38     Peptide neurotransmitters 1:27:00     Hypothalamic releasing hormones include thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). 1:29:15     Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) 1:29:32     Oxytocin 1:30:18     Vasopressin 1:30:57     Synthesis of the neuropeptides Substance P, MSH, oxytocin, and vasopressin requires glycine, zinc, copper, and vitamin C. 1:34:24     Endocannabinoids and the importance of arachidonic acid, EPA, and DHA Nutrition in Neuroscience Related Content

Chris Masterjohn Lite: Could Oxaloacetate Supplements Help With Glutamate Sensitivity?
Chris Masterjohn Lite: 5 Ways to Help With Glutamate Sensitivity and Glutamate Dominance
Chris Masterjohn Lite: Does Glycine or GABA Wake You Up?
Chris Masterjohn Lite: Carbs or Keto for Sleep?
Chris Masterjohn Lite: How to Manage Your Magnesium Status
Mastering Nutrition: Why You Need Glycine -- A Panel Discussion
Balancing Methionine and Glycine in Foods: The Database 


Chris Masterjohn Lite: Get Better Sleep With Glycine
Start Here for Methylation has glycine and choline resources, and covers the methylation process used in the synthesis and degradation of biogenic amines.


Mastering Nutrition: Methylate Your Way to Mental Health With Dopamine
The Pursuit of Happiness: How Nutrient-Dense Animal Fats Promote Mental and Emotional Health, covers the endocannibinoids.


Testing Nutritional Stat

Part 2 of how NUTRITION has a HUGE impact on your BRAIN!


Everything in your brain is something you ate, something you made from something you ate, or, in a few cases, something your mother ate. Nutrition impacts your mental and emotional health, the function of your five senses, and your conscious and unconscious control over your body movements.


Join me as I lead you in a safari through the textbook, “Neuroscience,” pointing out along the way all the interesting connections to nutrition. Listen in for part 2 on the NEUROTRANSMITTERS!

0:00:37     Cliff Notes 0:04:15     Overview of neurotransmitters 0:06:55     Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. 0:14:08      De novo glutamate in the central nervous system is overwhelmingly made from glucose. 0:16:55     Ketogenic diet for epilepsy 0:20:12    Glutamate metabolism 0:23:42    There are two classes of glutamate receptors: ionotropic and metabotropic. 0:24:45     There are three classes of metabotropic glutamate receptors, their actions are complex and variable, and they can be excitatory or inhibitory. 0:25:05     The ionotropic glutamate receptors include AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and kainite receptors, all of which have a depolarizing effect by allowing sodium and potassium to flow freely through them. 0:27:47     Four unique things about the NMDA receptor: magnesium is required to block its ion channel, it’s important for coincidence detection, it allows calcium to come into the cell, and it has a glycine-binding site. 0:33:16     Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are important for forming memories, and glutamate receptors play an important role. 0:40:48     GABA and glycine are the two primary inhibitory neurotransmitters of the central nervous system. 0:44:04     GABA and presumably glycine can be stimulatory if there is more chloride on the inside of the neuron than the outside. 0:48:53     Evidence that GABA might cross the blood-brain barrier 0:51:44     GABA in foods 0:54:14     GABA metabolism in the nervous system 0:56:08     Glycine 1:02:02     Acetylcholine 1:07:50     The biogenic amines include histamine, serotonin, and the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). 1:08:30     Synthesis of the catecholamines 1:10:46     Dopamine 1:14:08     Norepinephrine 1:16:32     Histamine 1:20:15     Serotonin 1:23:10     ATP and adenosine 1:26:38     Peptide neurotransmitters 1:27:00     Hypothalamic releasing hormones include thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). 1:29:15     Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) 1:29:32     Oxytocin 1:30:18     Vasopressin 1:30:57     Synthesis of the neuropeptides Substance P, MSH, oxytocin, and vasopressin requires glycine, zinc, copper, and vitamin C. 1:34:24     Endocannabinoids and the importance of arachidonic acid, EPA, and DHA Nutrition in Neuroscience Related Content

Chris Masterjohn Lite: Could Oxaloacetate Supplements Help With Glutamate Sensitivity?
Chris Masterjohn Lite: 5 Ways to Help With Glutamate Sensitivity and Glutamate Dominance
Chris Masterjohn Lite: Does Glycine or GABA Wake You Up?
Chris Masterjohn Lite: Carbs or Keto for Sleep?
Chris Masterjohn Lite: How to Manage Your Magnesium Status
Mastering Nutrition: Why You Need Glycine -- A Panel Discussion
Balancing Methionine and Glycine in Foods: The Database 


Chris Masterjohn Lite: Get Better Sleep With Glycine
Start Here for Methylation has glycine and choline resources, and covers the methylation process used in the synthesis and degradation of biogenic amines.


Mastering Nutrition: Methylate Your Way to Mental Health With Dopamine
The Pursuit of Happiness: How Nutrient-Dense Animal Fats Promote Mental and Emotional Health, covers the endocannibinoids.


Testing Nutritional Stat

1 hr 39 min