16 episodes

The Wagner Review is the student-run academic journal of the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University.

NYU Wagner Review Podcast Channel The Wagner Review

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

The Wagner Review is the student-run academic journal of the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University.

    Hallway Talks with Health Economist and NYU Wagner Dean Sherry Glied

    Hallway Talks with Health Economist and NYU Wagner Dean Sherry Glied

    Sherry Glied, a health economist and Dean of New York University’s Wagner School, walks us through her professional journey: starting out as a labor economist to being part of the team who designed the Affordable Care Act. Glied gives us insight into her time at Washington, D.C. working on health policy under the Bush, Clinton and Obama administrations, and analyzes the ins and outs of Presidential Candidate Joe Biden’s healthcare policy. Finally she gives a glimpse into her past and present life in academia during her time at Harvard, Columbia, and now NYU.Guest Speaker:Sherry Glied is Dean of New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. From 1989-2013, she was Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. She was Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management from 1998-2009. On June 22, 2010, Glied was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the Department of Health and Human Services, and served in that capacity from July 2010 through August 2012. She had previously served as Senior Economist for health care and labor market policy on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers in 1992-1993, under Presidents Bush and Clinton, and participated in the Clinton Health Care Task Force. She has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, the National Academy of Social Insurance, and served as a member of the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking.

    • 31 min
    Hallway Talks with John Gershman: Dissecting the 2020 Election Rhetorics and False Republican Narratives

    Hallway Talks with John Gershman: Dissecting the 2020 Election Rhetorics and False Republican Narratives

    Policy analysis and political hot-takes lead NYU Wagner MPA candidates Rhea Almeida and Luisa Portugal on a journey into the false narratives introduced by members of the Republican Party, and unexpected turn of events involving the upcoming 2020 United States presidential election. NYU Clinical Professor of Public Service John Gershman analyzes the 2020 Republican National Convention held last week, the politics of the Affordable Care Act – known as ObamaCare, the rise of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), and much more. He also emphasizes the importance of voting by mail early, and voting altogether. Guest Speaker: John Gershman is a Clinical Professor of Public Service and the Director of International Capstone Programs at Wagner. He is also a co-founding member of the New York Southeast Asia Network. Previously he was the Director of the Global Affairs Program at the International Relations Center and the Co-Director of Foreign Policy in Focus, a progressive think tank on U.S. foreign policy and international affairs. He has worked at a series of nonprofit think tanks since the early 1990s, including the Institute for Food and Development Policy and Partners in Health. He is a co-founder of the New York Southeast Asia Network.

    • 31 min
    Reflections on the Effects of Systemic Racial Biases in America

    Reflections on the Effects of Systemic Racial Biases in America

    The American criminal justice system has continuously failed to hold police officers accountable for excessive force against Black Americans. It is hard to ignore the injustices so many Black Americans face today. In the middle of a global pandemic, yet again we mourn the death of an unarmed Black man, George Floyd. On May 25th, 2020, Officer Derek Chauvin along with two additional officers pinned Floyd to the ground with Chauvin’s knee compressed on his neck for eight minutes, ultimately killing him. Two medical examiners— one hired by the family of George Floyd and the other hired by Hennepin County— have concluded his death was a homicide. Four days later, Minnesota’s Hennepin County District Attorney Mike Freeman announced that after reviewing video evidence and autopsy reports, his office “does not have enough evidence to criminally charge the four police officers” with his death— setting off what would be days of national outrage and protest. As of today, Officer Chauvin has been the only officer charged with his death, the case has since then been handed over to the Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison for prosecution.As we’ve seen with previous cases of fatal police brutality, it is unlikely that all of the officers involved will be held accountable for their actions. Not only is it important to seek justice for Floyd and many before him, but it’s more important that the American legal system works harder to eradicate systemic racial bias.Alexandra Kirton and Tasia Hawkins shed a light on the racial inequalities their family has faced, how non-Black allies can engage in these conversations, along with their experience on what it’s like to be Black in America. TRANSCRIPT:0:00: Welcome from hosts Rhea and Luisa0:34: Message from Tiffany Rose Miller, Editor-in-Chief of The Wagner Review3:50: Luisa Introducing speakers Alexandra Kirton and Tasia Hawkins16:47: Wrap up RESOURCES TO DONATE:ACLU – Call for Justice for George FloydBlack Lives MatterBlack Visions CollectiveBrooklyn Community Bail Out FundNational Bail OutUntil FreedomJustice League NYCReclaim the Block 

    • 17 min
    Episode 04 - The American with Disabilities Act and the Disability Rights Movement

    Episode 04 - The American with Disabilities Act and the Disability Rights Movement

    July 26, 2020 marked the 30th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While there has been tremendous progress made during the disability rights movement, there is still a long way to go. Emily Finkelstein talks with Nicole Jorwic, the Senior Director of Pubic Policy at The Arc, on the ADA in 2020 and her recommendations to strengthen the ADA; Emily also sits down with Abigail Shaw, a mentorship coordinator at Learning Ally to discuss her hopes for the future of the disability rights movement as someone who is deeply and personally impacted by it.Transcript:0:00: Welcome from Emily Finkelstein3:43: Nicole Jorwic discuss the most impactful parts of the Americans with Disabilities Act.20:40: Abigail Shaw discuss how we can better support Americans with disabilities.Photo Credit: rosefirerisingGUEST SPEAKERS:Nicole Jorwic is the Senior Director of Public Policy at The Arc, a national community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Prior to joining The Arc policy team Nicole served as Senior Policy Advisor for the state of Illinois. Prior to that appointment, Nicole served as the CEO/President of the Institute on Public Policy for People with Disabilities where she continued the Institute’s mission to improve the lives of people with disabilities and assisted the leadership of the state of Illinois in developing public policy driven best practices in serving individuals with disabilities. Nicole is also an accomplished special education attorney and an advocate for students with disabilities, with a focus on transition-aged youth. Nicole received her JD and Child and Family Law Certificate, from Loyola University Chicago. She received her BS from the University of Illinois. Nicole is also a sibling; her brother Chris is 31 and has autism.Abigail Shaw strives to educate the public on persons with disabilities through her hobbies and work. She received a BS in Music Industry Studies from Appalachian State University and is currently pursuing a Master’s in Social Work from Fordham University. Abigail works at Learning Ally, an educational solutions organization primarily serving individuals with print related disabilities. At Learning Ally, Abigail serves as the College Success Program’s mentorship coordinator for college students who are blind and contributes her skills with audio and recording to the production process of Learning Ally’s audio books. As a long-distance runner, Abigail is a member and co-captain of the New York City chapter of Achilles International, an organization promoting mainstream athletics for people with disabilities. She has competed in several national half and whole marathons and triathlons. Since June of 2019, she has been on the Advisory Committee on Transit Accessibility for New York City Transit, and currently acts as the co-chair. Whether by plane, train, or automobile—Abigail’s preferred method of transportation is with her yellow lab guide dog from Guiding Eyes for the Blind by her side.

    • 30 min
    Coronacast Episode 07 – From Orphanages to Adaptive Online Learning and Helping Children Cope during COVID-19

    Coronacast Episode 07 – From Orphanages to Adaptive Online Learning and Helping Children Cope during COVID-19

    At the top of the episode, hosts Rhea and Luisa talk about the unlikeliness of developing herd immunity in the US, and the subsequent risks of reopening schools in the Fall. On today’s episode, The Wagner Review features two NYU undergraduate students. NYU Tandon senior Nelson James walks us through the technological tools that can make the online learning experience adaptive and personalized for students during the coronavirus pandemic.Founder and director of Project Firefly, and NYU pre-med student Luisa Portugal (yes, there’s two of them!), discuss her efforts to help children in orphanages cope during COVID-19.TRANSCRIPT:0:00: Welcome from hosts Rhea and Luisa0:46: Top news of the week 7:05: Luisa Portugal discuss her efforts to help children in orphanages cope during COVID-19.12:58: Nelson James walks us through the technological tools that can make the online learning experience adaptive and personalized for students during the coronavirus pandemic.

    • 22 min
    Episode 01 – Mutual Aid Efforts in the Face of COVID-19

    Episode 01 – Mutual Aid Efforts in the Face of COVID-19

    The Wagner Review podcast series include’s NYU policy and law students that will analyze policy issues and solutions emerging in real-time around the country.In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States has seen record-breaking unemployment rates by US citizens. With many people out of work and unable to pay living expenses, food scarcity is on the rise as the economy reels. Undocumented immigrants and people living in particularly low socioeconomic neighborhoods, have felt the raft of being unable to pay for food and provide for their families. During this time, we’ve seen many mutual aid projects form throughout New York City and New Jersey, where community residents are taking the initiative to care for those unable able to receive adequate assistance from the government.Stephanie Rosas comes on The Wagner Review Podcast Series to discuss the mutual aid projects she has been involved in, and what it’s been like giving back to the community during the COVID-19 pandemic.TRANSCRIPT:0:00: Welcome and introduction from host Kyle Roland1:04: Stephanie Rosas discuss her mutual aid efforts in the midst of a pandemic Mutual Aid Links:New Jersey Mutual Aid Tenant Collective of Hudson CountyBrick City Mutual Aid Volunteer Survey

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

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5 Ratings

t.e.b. ,

This is a terrific student run podcast

The two hosts are smart and well-researched. The guests are expert, funny and just a pleasure to listen to. Excellent work!

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