47 min

Ocean Justice: Where Social Equity and Climate Fight intersect & Food & Water Justice Healthy Living Healthy Planet Radio

    • Health & Fitness

Emily Stengel of GreenWave and Dr. Miriam Goldstein of American Progress join HLHP Radio.

Emily begins by explaining ocean agriculture to the listener. Underwater farming is affordable, scalable, replicable, and sustainable. By painting a true picture of these underwater farms, listeners are able to envision these zero input farms (no fertilizer, pesticides, animals, feed). The stark contrast to land-based farming is quite incredible. This is particularly important because our waters have really seen the impact of climate change, from animal extinction to agal blooms and job loss. Moreover, these are restorative crops, soaking up carbon, and promoting biodiversity in the ocean. The model provides endless environmental benefits. The economic benefits are also more accessible to a wider group of people, with the goal of creating sustainable opportunities for more people. Emily also reminds listeners that this model is not limited, it can be modeled in cool Alaskan waters, Caribbean waters, and everywhere in between, as long as the ocean crops are native. Emily closes by reminding listeners that purchasing seafood sustainably is a big part of the equation. It is our responsibility to make sustainable choices. You can gain more information about making sustainable choices by purchasing All We Can Save, a book Emily contributed to. 

Dr. Goldstein reminds us that justice for people and justice for the planet are intertwined, and cannot and should not be addressed separately. Rather, it is essential to look at the interconnectedness while tackling these issues. With a great threat to our environmental policy, we are faced with the challenge of rebuilding a clean and livable earth with equitable opportunity. Dr. Goldstein notes that there are many struggling across our nation right now, and those in coastal communities face even greater adversity as a result of rising sea levels. Moreover, the existing inequities in our system are being highlighted. Due to our country's history of systematic racism, communities of color receive less disaster aid. Thus, when sea levels rise and flooding ensues or storms wreak havoc, there is further damage to these communities. Dr. Goldstein also connects our economy and our oceans and the importance of linking the two responsibly. Dr Goldstein points toward hope as our state and local governments work to protect our oceans and our people in the wake of rollbacks on environmental protection acts. Dr. Goldstein works hard every day to protect our planet and she lends encouragement to listeners to do the same by voting both federally and locally. 


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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/healthy-radio/support

Emily Stengel of GreenWave and Dr. Miriam Goldstein of American Progress join HLHP Radio.

Emily begins by explaining ocean agriculture to the listener. Underwater farming is affordable, scalable, replicable, and sustainable. By painting a true picture of these underwater farms, listeners are able to envision these zero input farms (no fertilizer, pesticides, animals, feed). The stark contrast to land-based farming is quite incredible. This is particularly important because our waters have really seen the impact of climate change, from animal extinction to agal blooms and job loss. Moreover, these are restorative crops, soaking up carbon, and promoting biodiversity in the ocean. The model provides endless environmental benefits. The economic benefits are also more accessible to a wider group of people, with the goal of creating sustainable opportunities for more people. Emily also reminds listeners that this model is not limited, it can be modeled in cool Alaskan waters, Caribbean waters, and everywhere in between, as long as the ocean crops are native. Emily closes by reminding listeners that purchasing seafood sustainably is a big part of the equation. It is our responsibility to make sustainable choices. You can gain more information about making sustainable choices by purchasing All We Can Save, a book Emily contributed to. 

Dr. Goldstein reminds us that justice for people and justice for the planet are intertwined, and cannot and should not be addressed separately. Rather, it is essential to look at the interconnectedness while tackling these issues. With a great threat to our environmental policy, we are faced with the challenge of rebuilding a clean and livable earth with equitable opportunity. Dr. Goldstein notes that there are many struggling across our nation right now, and those in coastal communities face even greater adversity as a result of rising sea levels. Moreover, the existing inequities in our system are being highlighted. Due to our country's history of systematic racism, communities of color receive less disaster aid. Thus, when sea levels rise and flooding ensues or storms wreak havoc, there is further damage to these communities. Dr. Goldstein also connects our economy and our oceans and the importance of linking the two responsibly. Dr Goldstein points toward hope as our state and local governments work to protect our oceans and our people in the wake of rollbacks on environmental protection acts. Dr. Goldstein works hard every day to protect our planet and she lends encouragement to listeners to do the same by voting both federally and locally. 


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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/healthy-radio/support

47 min