46 episodes

A podcast for conscious parents who drop the f-bomb. A lot.

We are the overthinkers, the dreamers, and the doers. We are parenting in a radically different way than those before us. But our divine vision gets blurry cause...OMG...kids can be such a pain in the ass. Let's work from the inside out, in a whole brain, whole body way to mitigate the crappy behavior. Not just with our kids but with ourselves. So you can be the parent you envision.

Oh Crap I Love My Toddler... But Holy F*ck Jamie Glowacki

    • Kids & Family
    • 4.9 • 258 Ratings

A podcast for conscious parents who drop the f-bomb. A lot.

We are the overthinkers, the dreamers, and the doers. We are parenting in a radically different way than those before us. But our divine vision gets blurry cause...OMG...kids can be such a pain in the ass. Let's work from the inside out, in a whole brain, whole body way to mitigate the crappy behavior. Not just with our kids but with ourselves. So you can be the parent you envision.

    Patreon Unlock: Running Hot and Cold with Dr. Stephanie Rimka

    Patreon Unlock: Running Hot and Cold with Dr. Stephanie Rimka

    On this episode of the podcast, I’m so excited to be joined by Dr. Stephanie Rimka to talk about the science behind sauna, red light, and cold therapy. Dr. Rimka is a holistic brain optimization specialist; she’s been in private practice for twenty years, focusing on using a variety of natural therapies, including bio-hacks, to treat mental health issues including autism, depression, strokes, and Alzheimer’s. Her practice uses technology-based devices focusing on electromagnetic and light frequencies to alter brain structure and function and return normal function to it.
    To kick things off, I have an anecdote about how I got into cold therapy (it involves blue lips and the inability to do pull-ups) before handing things over to Dr. Rimka, who explains how it’s possible to put positive stress (like cold) on the body and encourage it to adapt and improve. Then she introduces red light therapy—often the treatment she’ll start her patients on—and how it stimulates the central nervous system to encourage deep, potent sleep in kids, especially in conjunction with skin-to-skin contact. Following that, we talk about parental dysregulation and disconnection, the impact these can have on children, and the need for parents to perform self-care so that they can care for their kids as well. I also bring up the trend for “mother martyrdom” that seems to be a result of social media encouraging comparison and competitiveness in parenting, and Dr. Rimka suggests that unreasonable expectations and information overload are causing parents to neglect themselves for the sake of perfectionism. After that brief detour, we get back on course, talking about sauna therapy and cold therapy, how your mitochondria dictate your tolerance for heat and cold, and the magic of sleep. Finally, we wrap things up by discussing how cold plunging can offer you a sense of control and calm while encouraging you to be mindful of your body and proving that you are capable of taking on hard things and succeeding.
     
    The Finer Details of This Episode:
      I got interested in cold therapy after taking part in a Tough Mudder obstacle course race, which included an ice climb.   Hormesis is the physiological concept of putting a stressor on the body that actually makes the body better.   Dr. Rimka usually starts her patients with red light therapy before moving on to sauna therapy.   Red light is highly stimulating to the vagus nerve, a cranial nerve that comes out of your brain and is the most soothing, calming part of the nervous system.   Skin-to-skin contact also activates the vagus nerve and stimulates oxytocin, the love hormone. This is especially important for children, who need touch, holding, and bonding.   The fight or flight response is designed to last twenty to thirty seconds optimally and two minutes maximum. Yet many families are in fight or flight all day long, and that input is destroying health and longevity because your body can’t fight threats when it’s constantly in life or death mode.   Dysregulated parents will always struggle to co-regulate with their child, and often the parent will assume the lack of regulation is a problem with the child rather than examining their own issues. It’s critical for parents to accept that they need to take care of themselves in order to take care of their families, even if that means bringing someone in to help.   Dr. Rimka suggests that we have unrealistic expectations of what motherhood is supposed to be because of the information overload and the distractions of the internet and social media.   She also says that parents, in general, are much more dissociated now than in the past because they’re overly connected to their digital devices and neglect their connection with their kids.   I recently went through a rocky patch with Pascal where his behavior wasn’t so pleasant, and I felt like our connection was severed. Then I realized that instead of being reactive with him, I n

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Patreon Unlock: Living Your Authentic Life with World Traveler Jessica Sueiro

    Patreon Unlock: Living Your Authentic Life with World Traveler Jessica Sueiro

    On today’s episode, I speak with yet another person I find truly fascinating, Jessica Sueiro. Jessica and her husband, Will, along with their two children, Avalon and Largo, are world traveling, homeschooling, bohemian vagabonds in the best possible way. They have an amazing YouTube channel called World Towning, where they document their full-time travel family adventures and share their passion for dreaming big. Jessica joins me from a boat in Majorca to discuss her family’s decision to leave their Boston 2013 in favor of trekking around the world together, how they have thrived throughout their traveling adventures, and the experience of managing homeschool in the process.
    Jessica talks about overcoming the fear of screwing up your kids or being judged by others to step out of the box and follow your own path. She shares how her family maintains a sense of stability, routine, and deep connection as world travelers, how her children have navigated their social needs through this experience, and her thoughts on minimalism. We chat about the delicate balance of transitioning grandparents away from giving stuff in favor of experiences, and I ask Jessica how she handles being with her kids all day long as a HSP (Highly Sensitive Person). Finally, we discuss the importance of community and asking for help, how traveling makes you a better, more humble person, and Jessica offers her best advice for listeners who are considering a major life change or transition from the norm.
    For more information about the Sueiro family and their traveling lifestyle, visit WorldTowningVoyages.com or check out their YouTube Channel, which features new videos every Friday. Thank you for your listening! I appreciate your patronage more than I can say. For more information on my potty training and parenting resources, please visit the links below.


    The Finer Details of This Episode:
    Jessica and her husband, Will, always wanted to travel with their kids but didn’t think it was possible A summer trip to Paris sparked their interest in international travel They realized they all thrived in their travelling adventures and decided to make it happen on their own They wanted to instill a global education for their children, have more time together,  forge a tighter bond as a family, and create memories over buying stuff Most people have a fear of stepping out of the box - accepting that we will f-ck up our kids no matter where we are gives us the freedom to take that leap It took them seven years to finally decide to change their lives - they are planners and it was not an impulsive decision They have a travel-based business, which works for their lifestyle They have maintained a sense of rhythm and routine as travelers by reading at night, eating dinner together, and having consistency as a family Home is in the heart, not the house you’re living in They have an ‘open-door policy’ where you can always interrupt if you have a question or need emotional support They have always prioritized their children’s social components through the homeschooling experience, which has been challenging during the pandemic Her daughter started her own book club, to help meet social needs and connect with friends Listen to your kids’ interests, create what you need, and be open-minded about the way kids make friends today Jessica shares how their travels informed a minimalist lifestyle - she is a minimalist by nature For the first three years, they left with eight bags and eight carry-ons, and lived in different countries for nine to twelve months at a time They traveled from Costa Rica to Ecuador to France, then they moved to an RV Their policy was if something came in, something went out Focus is on experiences over stuff Grandparents traditionally show their love through gifts and toys, but Jessica and Will have really tried to transition grandparents to giving experiences instead Grandparents get joy out of watching kids open presents, but Jessi

    • 55 min
    Patreon Unlock: Helping Your Child Learn Their Regulation

    Patreon Unlock: Helping Your Child Learn Their Regulation

    Continuing on from my episode about Co-Regulation, today I’ll be sharing all of my insights, tips, and tricks on how to help your child effectively recognize when their emotions are building up, and cope with them before they escalate out of control. Our kids are very present in their bodies, which is why their feelings tend to come out in very physical ways. Having your child describe the physical sensation of their emotions, asking where they feel them (in the cheeks, fingers, chest, behind their eyes, etc.), using the “Hot and Cold” Method, and giving their feelings a specific name can help slow the process down and give your child time to identify what’s going on.  Having a “Throwing Corner” in your home, checking in with your child throughout the day, engaging in Big Play, and getting outside can also help as an outlet for emotional tension.
    In today’s episode, I’ll also revisit difficult transitions as we return to life after the pandemic, and the importance of connecting during these “hot spot” moments instead of rushing to the next “big event.” I’ll answer questions about hitting, how to support your “Wild Child” with strict boundaries, but allowing for plenty of freedom within those limits, and the crucial role that sleep and nutrition play for highly reactive children. Remember that we get the kid that is meant for us, and to focus on their good qualities instead of getting bogged down in the challenges. You can do this, and your patience in teaching your child how to self regulate will be a tremendous gift to them as they grow into emotionally intelligent, self-aware teenagers and adults. 
    Thank you for your listening, and I appreciate your patronage more than I can say. For more information on my potty training and parenting resources, please visit the links below.
     
    The Finer Details of This Episode:
    Adding on to C0-Regulation episode Developmental Biologist Bruce Lipton has noted that until age 7, kids don’t have consciousness or self-awareness just yet We want to allow emotions to flow, but also be teaching children the language and skills to properly cope with them Help kids recognize when they are experiencing a buildup of emotion, and intervene before it instantly escalates from 0-60 This will all take practice Name events and emotions in a non-hot moment Our kids are very present in their bodies, which is why emotions come out in such physical ways Asking your child where they feel their emotions (cheeks, fingers, chest, behind the eyes) will help slow the process down Use “Hot/Cold” language to identify feelings or give them a name (e.g., “Rage Monster”) With highly reactive children, keep in mind that food allergies or sensitivities could be playing a role Start the day by checking in with your child and using a “dial” to measure where their big feelings lie Continue to check in throughout the day ‘Throwing Corner’ in your house can help kids vocalize their feelings and complete the circuit of emotion If you suspect a sensory issue, compression is very effective as well - you can roll your child up in a blanket, like a “Baby Burrito,” and this can help diffuse the event as they feel it coming on This helps teach emotional wisdom, intelligence, recognition, and the ability to calm themselves - this will be an incredibly helpful life skill as they get older Big play, physical activity, outdoor time also help as an outlet for emotional tension Transitions continue to be very difficult as we return to life after the pandemic Young toddlers do not remember life before COVID, and all they know is your parenting through the pandemic Picking kids up from preschool or daycare is a particularly difficult transition right now Make sure to have a high level of connection when leaving in the morning and coming home  Don’t wait until you get home to have fun and connect with your child - start as soon as you pick them up, walk to the car, or on your driv

    • 42 min
    Patreon Unlock: “Badass With Boundaries” Empowerment Coach Anna Glasgow

    Patreon Unlock: “Badass With Boundaries” Empowerment Coach Anna Glasgow

    Anna Glasgow is an empowerment coach with a passion for personal growth. She has a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership, and runs the amazing program, “Badass With Boundaries.” We connected over her toddler’s potty training journey on Instagram, and today she joins me as part of my ongoing series in which I simply talk to very cool people! Anna and I break down why boundaries are so important in helping yourself and your family feel safe and secure, the most common areas in which they tend to be crossed, why women tend to have weaker boundaries than men (and how this is exacerbated in parenthood), and how to create your own boundaries using your Love Language and Anna’s Hell Yes/Hell No Method.
    Anna shares how leaving an abusive relationship sparked her passion for this topic, and details her own experience hammering out boundaries after becoming a mother. Teaching consent, healing childhood wounds, and reparenting are also discussed. We chat about not having to justify our boundaries to anyone, trusting our intuition, and Anna reminds listeners that boundaries don’t make you a bitch - they make you a badass. To learn more about Anna’s program, visit www.AGlasgowCoach.com or email her at AGlasgowCoach@gmail.com.
     
    The Finer Details of This Episode:
    Anna works with badass women who are rocking it in most areas of their life, but need a little tweaking in one or two areas, usually with their boundaries No one has absolutely everything figured out - everyone has a chink in their armor Women tend to have weaker boundaries, which only get exacerbated through parenting When you are driving your car, there are boundaries and rules to protect everyone - knowing where those are keeps you safe and secure The same idea applies to parenting When boundaries and rules are constantly changing, it’s a cluster f**k and makes everyone feel anxious and insecure Analogy of double-dutching Men and women view chores differently, and it’s up to us to vocalize our expectations instead of leaving them unsaid and resenting partner or kids for not meeting them It’s hard to say what we need, because it opens us up to feeling vulnerable or being rejected Anna shares how leaving an abusive relationship sparked her passion for setting boundaries and teaching others to do the same Moms tend to have “grayer” boundaries than Dads - Dad will simply say “No” and move on Anna’s Hell Yes mentality - if she sits down and asks herself whether she wants to do something or attend a certain event, if it’s not a “Hell Yes,” then it’s a “Hell No” Knowing what you definitely want or don’t want in life helps your boundaries shape themselves Hell Yes/F**k No Theory also applies to teaching consent - it’s either Hell Yes, or F**k No and there is no gray area Your Love Language should factor in as you set your own boundaries You need to set boundaries not only with partners and loved ones, but also with yourself Not being able to hold boundaries for yourself (food, social media consumption) is often related to unhealed childhood wounds Hammering out her own boundaries with family after becoming a mother Stay neutral when people ask questions or pass judgment - you don’t have to assign meaning to it or take comments personally Parenthood has tested Anna’s boundaries and shown her which faults she needs to work on Reparenting and accepting that your child may not like the boundaries you’ve set You don’t have to justify your boundaries to anyone Too much information from the internet and social media has caused us to doubt our own intuition  
    Quotes:
    “I just really work with badass women who are kind of - they're rocking it in most areas of their life, but they just have this one area that needs tweaking. And it's typically because boundaries are lacking in that area.”
    “I need to let my Yes be a Yes, and my No be a No.”
    “Knowing what you really, really want to do in life, and what you definitely

    • 45 min
    Patreon Unlock: Co-Regulation

    Patreon Unlock: Co-Regulation

    Today’s episode is the mother of all follow-ups. I’ll be revisiting my episodes on the ‘Go To Your Room’ strategy, tantrums, and negative associations, to clarify some confusion and answer all of your questions on these topics. One of the key ideas here is co-regulation, and whether you can lend your child your calm in moments of dysregulation. If you can be present with inaction, and simply be with your child without trying to fix the feeling or becoming dysregulated yourself, then you can hold space for them. But this is not always possible, as we could be dealing with stressors, trauma, or childhood wounds that sometimes make us lose our shit. And if that's the case, this is when you want to implement the harm reduction model and use the Go To Your Room strategy. It can be done in a way that doesn’t feel “abandoning”, and it prevents you from saying something psychologically damaging, and also allows your child to experience the full cycle of their feelings, and settle their bodies on their own.
    When our little ones are upset, melting down, or having a tantrum, the traditional idea is that we need to do something to stop or shift the feeling. Today I break down why it’s important to let your child’s feelings run their course, how to identify the root of your own feelings of dysregulation, and why being fully present is the best way to help your child self-regulate. Remember that we are the first generation of parents to reevaluate the old ways and recognize that we could be doing better, so it’s only natural to find all of this overwhelming at times. But we are showing up to do the important work to keep ourselves regulated, heal childhood wounds, create boundaries, and co-regulate with our child not by calming them down, but by lending them our calm. Instead of doing something to help them self-regulate, we need to be something. And in order to do that, we need to be regulated ourselves. Today’s show looks at how to do exactly that.
    Thank you for your listening, and I appreciate your patronage more than I can say. For more information on my potty training and parenting resources, please visit the links below.
     
    The Finer Details of This Episode:
    The Go To Your Room strategy is not a time-out I will never pretend to have absolute answers, as every child and situation is different You are the expert on your child, but I am passionate about sharing my tips and tricks We are the first generation of parents to recognize that past parenting approaches were unhealthy and ineffective, so it can be confusing and overwhelming when everything is new territory - the internet also adds to this Go To Your Room strategy can often feel like you’re abandoning your child because it can be done is abandoning ways If you can tolerate your child’s meltdowns, you should probably hold space for your child in those moments - and that means presence with inaction If you cannot hold that space for your child, for any reason (you have an ill family member, you are exhausted from work, you are still figuring out returning to life after the pandemic, you still have a childhood wound), it’s best to use the Go To Your Room strategy for harm reduction If you can’t co-regulate without trying to stop the feeling, use the Go To Your Room strategy If you’re using the Go To Your Room strategy in a way that communicates, “Get out of my face, I can’t stand you,” then yes, that is abandoning Ideally we would never leave a child in distress, but if you are about to lose your shit and say something catastrophic, this can do a lot of damage and you need to be implementing the harm reduction model in those moments Co-regulation is presence with inaction - you’re not giving in or trying to fix the problem/feeling (e.g., make a new sandwich because they had a meltdown over it being cut the wrong way) There can be psychological damage when you try to stop the feeling and prevent it from running its full course, and also

    • 38 min
    Patreon Unlock: Hiking And Getting Outside with Lauren Robych-Eberle of ‘Kids Who Explore’

    Patreon Unlock: Hiking And Getting Outside with Lauren Robych-Eberle of ‘Kids Who Explore’

    Lauren Rodych-Eberle is one of the hosts of the Kids Who Explore podcast, which encourages families to connect with nature and explore the outdoors together. She is the owner of Miss Lauren’s Music Studio, where she teaches voice, piano, ukulele, and preschool music classes, and she is the author of several cookbooks. Lauren has a deep passion for food, hiking, adventure, and travel, and she is just an all-around cool person. We connected on Instagram over tips to handle ticks, and I am so excited to talk to her on the podcast today. 
    We begin with Lauren’s hiking essentials, including a lint roller, TickWise organic tick spray, and a First Aid Kit. We address the pressure parents put on themselves to tackle huge summits, stay on track, and not let their kids stop and explore trails. Lauren offers her advice to keep hikes short, sweet, and fun so that your kids will want to go again, and we look at how hiking builds grit from a young age. Lauren shares her idea to make summer and winter bucket lists, and we trade hilarious parenting stories about dealing with teenagers versus toddlers. We chat about how the most relaxed days with our kids are often the most memorable, why little ones should skip sippy cups altogether, and the inspiration behind Kids Who Explore with founder Adrianna Skori. 
    Lauren’s fascinating insights remind us that getting outside doesn’t have to be an extravagant undertaking - just getting out the door or putting your feet in the grass will have a tremendous impact on your life, and open up a world of adventure that you can enjoy safely with your kids. Thank you for your listening, and I appreciate your patronage more than I can say. 
    For more information on my potty training and parenting resources, please visit the links below.
     
    The Finer Details of This Episode:
    Lauren is one of the hosts of the Kids Who Explore podcast They want to help kids get outdoors She also owns a music studio, teaches music, writes cookbooks, and has a passion for adventure Lauren and I connected on Instagram over a post on ticks Tips to use a lint roller after being outdoors, wear white Her backpack essentials for hiking trips include all-natural TickWise organic spray, lint roller, First Aid Kit, water, snacks, bear spray, clothing layers, blanket, hat, and sunscreen Goal of Kids To Explore is just to get people out the front door, into nature, and not feel like they have to conquer a huge summit to go hiking Nature walks still qualify as hikes - whatever it takes to get your family outside A lot of parents feel they need to stay on track and do not want to stop and let their kids explore while hiking Keep the pace short, sweet, and fun so that your kids will want to go hiking again Exploring outdoors helps build grit Make time in nature a priority by investing in gear and including time for it in your schedule Lauren’s summer and winter bucket lists, and encouraging your kids to help you come up with ideas The importance of getting outside in the winter to help stave off depression and Cabin Fever Start looking for winter gear in the off-season to help mitigate the cost Most relaxed days with our kids are often the most memorable, like my days eating ice cream with Pascal for breakfast, lunch, and dinner Infantilizing problem with young kids, and instead encouraging them to skip over sippy cups altogether  They can start using open cups, like the Mini Cup, at 6 months  Parents can get obsessed with overhydrating their kids, which can complicate potty training and hinder building patience as a skill The inspiration behind Kids Who Explore with founder Adrianna Skori, and growing to 45,000 followers since launching in January 2021


    Quotes
    “We want nature to help raise our kids.”
    “The big thing is that we don't want people to feel like it has to be this huge mountain, this huge summit, in order for people to feel like they've accomplished something. We just want people to literally get ou

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
258 Ratings

258 Ratings

strawberrytawnny ,

this woman is amazing

i was so thrilled to discover this author while seeking guidance in dealing with my soon to be toddler. i first bought her book oh crap i have a toddler and then after reading it i immediately sought out more of her content and discovered this amazing podcast!

Rachel Nicole Morrison ,

K

Is crap a cuss word?

Clarisse Gomez ,

Awesome Podcast!!!

Jamie, host of the Oh Crap I Love My Toddler... But Holy F*c‪k‬ podcast, highlight all aspects of parenting and more in this can’t miss podcast! The host and expert guests offer insightful advice and information that is helpful to anyone that listens!

Top Podcasts In Kids & Family

Dr. Becky Kennedy
The Holderness Family
Dear Media, Aliza Pressman
Tinkercast | Wondery
Stories Podcast / Wondery

You Might Also Like

Dear Media, Aliza Pressman
Dr. Becky Kennedy
Erin Royer, MA Clinical Psychology, Child Development Specialist
QuickAndDirtyTips.com
Dr. Mona Amin