17 episodes

OMNIA is a podcast dedicated to all things Penn Arts & Sciences. Listen to insights and perspectives from the home of the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences at The University of Pennsylvania.

OMNIA Podcast OMNIA | Penn Arts & Sciences

    • Education
    • 4.7, 3 Ratings

OMNIA is a podcast dedicated to all things Penn Arts & Sciences. Listen to insights and perspectives from the home of the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences at The University of Pennsylvania.

    60-Second Lectures | Spring 2019

    60-Second Lectures | Spring 2019

    In this episode of the OMNIA Podcast, we recap the 60-Second lectures from the spring of 2019 and highlight two favorites from our archive. You’ll learn about race in the USA from a philosophical perspective, the psychology of why we quit, why truth matters to democracy, and new pedagogies for teaching in the age of climate change.

    Our dip into the archives features the 2016 60-Second SLAM winning talk, "The Other Opioid Crisis: How We Learned to Ignore Untreated Pain in Poor Countries," by then History and Sociology of Science Ph.D. candidate Luke Messac, and a 2006 talk, "Beyond the Founding Fathers," by Kathy Peiss, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History.

    Many thanks to our spring 2019 lecturers: Quayshawn Spencer, Robert S. Blank Presidential Associate Professor of Philosophy; Joseph Kable, Baird Term Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of MindCORE; Sophia Rosenfeld, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History; and Bethany Wiggin, Associate Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and Founding Director of the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities and her students, Tathagat Bhatia and Lucy Corlett from Penn and Claire Hampton from Bryn Mawr.

    Since 2003, the 60-Second Lecture Series has challenged Arts and Sciences faculty to distill a wealth of knowledge into a one-minute talk.

    Every Wednesday in September and April sees Penn Arts and Sciences faculty members standing at a podium on College Green and lecturing on topics ranging from human history to fractions to fly fishing—all in under a minute.

    To view the complete archive of 60-Second Lectures featuring faculty, students, and alumni, visit the Penn Arts and Sciences Vimeo library: vimeo.com/channels/60seclec

    Produced by Penn Arts and Sciences
    • Narrated and edited by Camille Dibenedetto
    • Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (https://apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (http://bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 12 min
    You Can’t Hurt a Poem, and Other Lessons from Charles Bernstein

    You Can’t Hurt a Poem, and Other Lessons from Charles Bernstein

    In this episode, we talk to Charles Bernstein, inventive poet, writer of libretti, translator, archivist, and, since 2003, a member of Penn's faculty. Bernstein is the Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature and co-director of PennSound. He retired from the Department of English at the end of the spring 2019 semester.

    In 2019, Bernstein was awarded the Bollingen Prize for American Poetry awarded by Yale University. The Bollingen Prize is awarded biennially by the Yale University Library to an American poet for the best book published during the previous two years or for lifetime achievement in poetry.

    Produced by Penn Arts & Sciences
    • Narrated by Lauren Thacker
    • Edited by Alex Schein
    • Music by Blue Dot Sessions
    • Allen Ginsberg "Howl" (Big Table Chicago Reading, 1959) and Robert Frost "Dust of Snow" (Readings at Columbia University, May 5, 1933) courtesy of PennSound: http://bit.ly/2VtVElp

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 18 min
    Philosophy of Race

    Philosophy of Race

    Quayshawn Spencer asks a simple question about race with a not-so-simple answer: what kind of thing is it? Spencer, the Robert S. Blank Presidential Associate Professor of Philosophy at Penn, poses the question to undergraduates in his Philosophy of Race course. As a specialist in the philosophies of science, biology, and race, his course examines the very nature and reality of race, beginning with early theories put out by European thinkers including Francois Bernier and Immanuel Kant. Kant’s 18th century essay, “Of the Different Human Races,” provided a scientific definition of race that would influence a long tradition of scholars using science to reinforce negative racial stereotypes—a tradition that Spencer’s course investigates alongside more contemporary philosophical, social, and political questions about race and racism.

    Produced by Penn Arts and Sciences
    • Narrated by Alex Schein
    • Recorded and edited by Alex Schein
    • Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 20 min
    OMNIA 101: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    OMNIA 101: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    In our new series, OMNIA 101, we talk to faculty members about integral aspects of their research, shedding light on their biggest challenges and their strategies for conquering them.

    Mark Trodden, Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Fay R. and Eugene L. Langberg Professor of Physics, and Masao Sako, Associate Professor and Undergraduate Department Chair, have different approaches to exploring two of the greatest mysteries in their field: dark matter and dark energy.

    Trodden, a theoretical physicist, devises mathematical models in an effort to explain the cosmic data that observational astronomers like Sako obtain using telescopes and other tools. In this episode of the OMNIA podcast, we asked both of them to help us understand dark matter and dark energy.

    Produced by Penn Arts and Sciences
    • Narrated by Karen Brooks
    • Recorded and edited by Alex Schein
    • Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 15 min
    60-Second Lectures | Fall 2018

    60-Second Lectures | Fall 2018

    Since 2003, the 60-Second Lecture Series has challenged Arts and Sciences faculty to distill a wealth of knowledge into a one-minute talk.

    Every Wednesday in September and April sees Penn Arts and Sciences faculty members standing at a podium on College Green and lecturing on topics ranging from human history, to fractions, to fly fishing—all in under a minute.

    The latest OMNIA podcast recaps the fall 2018 lectures and highlights two old favorites. In this episode, you’ll learn about greening vacant lots and what that means for crime rates, little-known medieval words that accurately describe the 2018 midterm elections, interpreting the Constitution, the very nature of time, and the evolving cultural and political questions raised ever-improving technologies of speech recognition and information retrieval.

    Our dip into the archives features a 2009 talk titled “Why Achievement Isn’t Normal,” given by Angela Duckworth, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Psychology, 2013 MacArthur Fellow, and New York Times best-selling author of Grit, and a 2015 lecture, “What Video Games Have Taught Me About Shakespeare,” by Rebecca Bushnell, School of Arts and Sciences Board of Overseers Professor of English, and former Dean of Penn Arts and Sciences.

    Many thanks to our fall 2018 lecturers:

    John MacDonald, Professor of Criminology and Sociology and the Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director at the Fels Institute of Government

    Emily Steiner, Professor of English, and Aylin Malcolm, Ph.D. student in English

    Samuel Freeman, the Avalon Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Philosophy and Law

    Jamal Elias, Walter H. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Religious Studies and South Asia Studies

    Mark Liberman, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Linguistics.

    To view the complete archive of 60-Second Lectures featuring faculty, students, and alumni, visit the Penn Arts and Sciences Vimeo library: https://vimeo.com/channels/60seclec

    Produced by Penn Arts and Sciences
    • Narrated and edited by Alex Derrick
    • Music by Blue Dot Sessions, John Phillip Sousa, and Xylo-Ziko

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 15 min
    The Rise of Women in Politics in 2018

    The Rise of Women in Politics in 2018

    In this episode, we explore a potential watershed moment in American politics: the unprecedented number of women running for office in 2018. Dawn Teele, Janice and Julian Bers Assistant Professor of Political Science, researches women and politics, voting rights reform, and candidate recruitment. Right now, she’s studying Emerge, the largest Democratic campaign training program in the United States. The program recruits, trains, and connects Democratic women who want to run for office.

    We speak with Teele about the historical underrepresentation of women in politics and discuss some of the cultural narratives and structural factors—from fundraising trends to division of household labor—that potentially impact the success of female candidates in U.S. elections.

    Produced by Penn Arts & Sciences
    • Narrated, recorded, and edited by Anne Hoffman
    • Music: "Wanderers" by Dana Boule and "Roundpine" by Blue Dot Sessions

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 8 min

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