21 episodes

OMNIA is a podcast dedicated to all things Penn Arts & Sciences. Listen to insights and perspectives from the home of the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences at The University of Pennsylvania.

OMNIA Podcast OMNIA | Penn Arts & Sciences

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 4 Ratings

OMNIA is a podcast dedicated to all things Penn Arts & Sciences. Listen to insights and perspectives from the home of the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences at The University of Pennsylvania.

    In These Times | Exacerbating the Health Care Divide (Ep. 4)

    In These Times | Exacerbating the Health Care Divide (Ep. 4)

    With rates of diagnoses and death disproportionately affecting racial minorities and low-income workers, experts in this episode address how COVID-19 has further exposed already dire health outcome inequalities.
    We begin with a political scientist discussing how governmental policy drives health inequality, especially during times of crisis. Then, a Ph.D. student in history and sociology of science talks about how infectious microbes like the coronavirus can affect communities of people with genetic vulnerabilities. And finally, a professor of sociology, Africana studies, and law, discusses how the biological concept of race was invented as a way to justify racism and influence outcomes.
    FEATURING:
    Julia Lynch, Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies
    Rebecca Mueller, doctoral candidate in the Department of History and Sociology of Science
    Dorothy Roberts, George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology, Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights, and Professor of Africana Studies
    ***
    Produced by Blake Cole
    Narrated by Alex Schein
    Edited by Alex Schein and Brooke Sietinsons
    Interviews by Blake Cole and Jane Carroll
    Theme music by Nicholas Escobar, C'18
    Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions
    Illustration by Nick Matej
    Logo by Drew Nealis
    In These Times is a production of Penn Arts & Sciences. Visit our series website to learn more and listen to the first season of In These Times. 
    Visit our editorial magazine, Omnia, for more content from Penn Arts & Sciences faculty, students, and alumni. 
    Follow Penn Arts & Sciences on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. 
     

    • 31 min
    In These Times | Crisis Upon Crisis (Ep. 3)

    In These Times | Crisis Upon Crisis (Ep. 3)

    The coronavirus pandemic does not exist in a vacuum. We look at other urgent issues of our time, and examine how they affect and are affected by COVID-19.
    We start this episode—as most things seem to now—with the partisan polarization in the U.S., asking a political science professor if people really are seeing everything in red or blue. Then a historian and legal scholar tells how we got to this state of racial injustice, decades after the Civil Rights movement. Finally, the German professor leading Penn’s environmental humanities program describes life in the climate crisis and the vision she gets from her students of going beyond a "new normal."
    Guests:
    Matthew Levendusky, Professor of Political Science and Penny and Robert A. Fox Director of the Fels Institute of Government
    Mary Frances Berry, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and Professor of History and Africana Studies
    Bethany Wiggin, Associate Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and Founding Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
    ***
    Produced by Susan Ahlborn  
    Narrated by Alex Schein
    Edited by Alex Schein and Brooke Sietinsons
    
Interviews by Susan Ahlborn, Blake Cole, and Lauren Rebecca Thacker
    Theme music by Nicholas Escobar, C'18  
    Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions
    
Illustration by Nick Matej
    
Logo by Drew Nealis
     
    In These Times is a production of Penn Arts & Sciences. Visit our series website to learn more and listen to the first season of In These Times. 
    Visit our editorial magazine, Omnia, for more content from Penn Arts & Sciences faculty, students, and alumni. 
    Follow Penn Arts & Sciences on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. 

    • 25 min
    In These Times | Dimensions of the Covid-19 Crisis (Ep. 1)

    In These Times | Dimensions of the Covid-19 Crisis (Ep. 1)

    “In these times” has been a handy turn of phrase in 2020, with varying adjectives used to modify it. Challenging. Unique. Strange. What started as a useful shorthand for the COVID-19 pandemic and the surreal nature of stay-at-home orders became used describe world-wide protests and calls for racial justice. This fall, the OMNIA podcast goes beyond the shorthand, using COVID-19 as a platform for a six-episode series that explores the science, social science, and history that has shaped events in 2020.
    To kick things off, we talk to a biologist about contagion. We’ll get insight on mutations, tracking COVID-19’s spread, and protection from antibodies and vaccines. But COVID-19 is more than the disease itself, so we drop in on a conversation between sociologists about health inequality. They’re not surprised that Black, brown, and low-income communities are being affected by COVID-19 at higher rates, but they are concerned about the still-unknown long-term effects on physical and mental health. And finally, a philosopher of science gets real on what high school science gets wrong and why that matters.
    Guests:
    David Roos, E. Otis Kendall Professor of Biology
    Courtney Boen, Assistant­ Professor of Sociology and Axilrod Faculty Fellow
    Regina Baker, Assistant­ Professor of Sociology
    Michael Weisberg, Professor and Chair of Philosophy
    ***
    Produced by Lauren Rebecca Thacker
    Narrated and edited by Alex Schein
    Interviews by Jane Carroll, Blake Cole, and Lauren Rebecca Thacker
    Theme music by Nicholas Escobar, C'18
    Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions
    Illustration by Nick Matej
    Logo by Drew Nealis
    In These Times is a production of Penn Arts & Sciences. Visit our series website to learn more and listen to the first season of In These Times. 
    Visit our editorial magazine, Omnia, for more content from Penn Arts & Sciences faculty, students, and alumni. 
    Follow Penn Arts & Sciences on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. 
     

    • 31 min
    In These Times | In Other Times (Ep. 2)

    In These Times | In Other Times (Ep. 2)

    Details from the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 or the quarantines during the bubonic plague sound familiar today. In our second episode, we talk to historians about how past societies dealt with disease, and what happened when a new understanding of germs revolutionized our approach but led us to overlook the larger picture of health. A legal historian explains why the U.S. pandemic repose was state-centered. And an English professor looks at the AIDS epidemic, and reflects on the human right to mourn.
    Guests:
    David Barnes, Associate Professor of History and Sociology of Science
    Sarah Barringer Gordon, Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History
    Alexander Chase-Levenson, Assistant Professor of History
    Dagmawi Woubshet, Ahuja Family Presidential Associate Professor of English
    ***
    Produced by Susan Ahlborn
    Narrated and edited by Alex Schein
    Interviews by Susan Ahlborn and Jane Carroll
    Theme music by Nicholas Escobar, C'18
    Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions
    Illustration by Nick Matej
    Logo by Drew Nealis
     
    In These Times is a production of Penn Arts & Sciences. Visit our series website to learn more and listen to the first season of In These Times. 
    Visit our editorial magazine, Omnia, for more content from Penn Arts & Sciences faculty, students, and alumni. 
    Follow Penn Arts & Sciences on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. 

    • 32 min
    60-Second Lectures | Spring 2019

    60-Second Lectures | Spring 2019

    In this episode of the OMNIA Podcast, we recap the 60-Second lectures from the spring of 2019 and highlight two favorites from our archive. You’ll learn about race in the USA from a philosophical perspective, the psychology of why we quit, why truth matters to democracy, and new pedagogies for teaching in the age of climate change.

    Our dip into the archives features the 2016 60-Second SLAM winning talk, "The Other Opioid Crisis: How We Learned to Ignore Untreated Pain in Poor Countries," by then History and Sociology of Science Ph.D. candidate Luke Messac, and a 2006 talk, "Beyond the Founding Fathers," by Kathy Peiss, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History.

    Many thanks to our spring 2019 lecturers: Quayshawn Spencer, Robert S. Blank Presidential Associate Professor of Philosophy; Joseph Kable, Baird Term Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of MindCORE; Sophia Rosenfeld, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History; and Bethany Wiggin, Associate Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and Founding Director of the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities and her students, Tathagat Bhatia and Lucy Corlett from Penn and Claire Hampton from Bryn Mawr.

    Since 2003, the 60-Second Lecture Series has challenged Arts and Sciences faculty to distill a wealth of knowledge into a one-minute talk.

    Every Wednesday in September and April sees Penn Arts and Sciences faculty members standing at a podium on College Green and lecturing on topics ranging from human history to fractions to fly fishing—all in under a minute.

    To view the complete archive of 60-Second Lectures featuring faculty, students, and alumni, visit the Penn Arts and Sciences Vimeo library: vimeo.com/channels/60seclec

    Produced by Penn Arts and Sciences
    • Narrated and edited by Camille Dibenedetto
    • Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (https://apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (http://bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 12 min
    You Can’t Hurt a Poem, and Other Lessons from Charles Bernstein

    You Can’t Hurt a Poem, and Other Lessons from Charles Bernstein

    In this episode, we talk to Charles Bernstein, inventive poet, writer of libretti, translator, archivist, and, since 2003, a member of Penn's faculty. Bernstein is the Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature and co-director of PennSound. He retired from the Department of English at the end of the spring 2019 semester.

    In 2019, Bernstein was awarded the Bollingen Prize for American Poetry awarded by Yale University. The Bollingen Prize is awarded biennially by the Yale University Library to an American poet for the best book published during the previous two years or for lifetime achievement in poetry.

    Produced by Penn Arts & Sciences
    • Narrated by Lauren Thacker
    • Edited by Alex Schein
    • Music by Blue Dot Sessions
    • Allen Ginsberg "Howl" (Big Table Chicago Reading, 1959) and Robert Frost "Dust of Snow" (Readings at Columbia University, May 5, 1933) courtesy of PennSound: http://bit.ly/2VtVElp

    Subscribe to the OMNIA Podcast by Penn Arts & Sciences on iTunes (apple.co/2XVWCbC) and Stitcher (bit.ly/2Lf2G9h)

    • 18 min

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