100 episodes

Your daily movie review podcast featuring currently playing, newly streaming, classic and cult films. One movie per day, every day.

One Movie Punch Joseph Dobzynski, Jr.

    • TV & Film

Your daily movie review podcast featuring currently playing, newly streaming, classic and cult films. One movie per day, every day.

    Episode 698 - The Gentlemen (2020)

    Episode 698 - The Gentlemen (2020)

    Hi everyone!
    Welcome back for another Matinee Monday! This week, I’ll be covering Guy Ritchie’s new film, one of my favorite directors once upon a time, especially for classics like LOCK, STOCK, AND TWO SMOKING BARRELS and SNATCH, along with a host of English gangster films. He’s hit a rough patch as of late, but will today’s film be a return to form? You’ll find out in a moment!
    Before the review, we’ll have a promo from the Top 5 from Fighting podcast. Every episode, Greg and Mike discuss a wide range of topics, and when they disagree, you know they’re gonna fight about it! Always fun, but always contentious, you don’t want to miss a single episode. You can find them on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @Top5forFighting. They have been some of our biggest supporters from last year. Shout out to their Marketing Angel. You know who you are!
    Subscribe to stay current with the latest releases.
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    Here we go!
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    Today’s movie is THE GENTLEMEN(2020), written and directed by Guy Ritchie, based on a story developed with Ivan Atkinson and Marn Davies. The film follows an attempt by American-born Irish drug lord Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey) to sell his extensive marijuana business to Oklahoma billionaire Matthew Berger (Jeremy Strong). After an attack on one of Pearson’s growhouses puts the deal in jeopardy, Pearson must manage the repercussions, even as other players seek a more hostile takeover.
    No spoilers.
    I remember when I began my career out of college, traveling to Los Angeles in 2001 for a consulting gig, where I met one of my good friends, who was also a fan of movies. Movies hadn’t yet moved to streaming services, but he had grown up closer to Chicago than I had, and as such, had access to a much more extensive selection of films than either my corn town or state university rental stores had to offer. So, once we got to talking about movies, he asked if I knew about Guy Ritchie, and I said no, and his jaw hit the floor. So, that weekend I went to our rental store in Denver, checked out LOCK, STOCK, AND TWO SMOKING BARRELS (1998) and SNATCH (2000), and immediately fell in love with UK gangster films as a whole. Every few years, Ritchie would put out another gangster picture, including REVOLVER (2005) and ROCKNROLLA (2008). There was also SWEPT AWAY (2002), but we don’t talk about that one.
    Ritchie’s star was really on the rise when he was given the green light for his SHERLOCK HOLMES franchise, which completed two films before Robert Downey, Jr. disappeared into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It opened up his schedule to pursue a number of mainstream films, all of which only did okay critically speaking, including THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. (2015), KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD (2017), and strangely, the recent live-action adaptation of ALADDIN (2019).
    It seems like a strange direction for the previous monarch of UK gangster films, but that’s because other things have been in the works, most notably the successful “Snatch” television series, expanding on the story from the 2000 film in the same way the “Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels” television series followed the 1998 film. And clearly, that has most recently influenced today’s film, THE GENTLEMEN, a return to form for Ritchie, but in some ways, maybe from a bygone era.
    There are a lot of things I liked about Ritchie’s gangster films, but most especially his combination of characters and story he brings to whatever project. THE GENTLEMEN is driven by both characters and story, told on multiple levels. Initially, the story begins as a conversation between Pearson’s reserved right-hand man Ray (Charlie Hunnam), and an almost unrecognizable Hugh Grant as the hilarious, pansexual reporter Flet

    • 10 min
    Episode 697 - Troop Zero (2019)

    Episode 697 - Troop Zero (2019)

    Hi everyone!
    Welcome back for another week of reviews. This week, we have a wide variety of films for you, truly something for everyone this week, and maybe at least one or two films for nobody. Today, I’ll be reviewing another feel-good family film, this time on Amazon Prime, followed by my review for Guy Ritchie’s latest film, THE GENTLEMEN, tomorrow. On Tuesday, the How I Met Your Friends podcast will be covering CATS, the film everyone loves to hate. On Wednesday, we’ll be dropping Episode #700, and it’ll be a doozy called ZOMBIE WITH A SHOTGUN. On Thursday, One Movie Spouse returns to unleash a rant like no other over BOMBSHELL. Andrew Campbell returns on Friday with his review of the upcoming THE LODGE, recently picked up by Neon for a limited release. And on Saturday, I’ll be reviewing FOR SAMA, another difficult documentary about the situation in Syria.
    Over on our Patreon page, we have an interview with Alexander Cooper, writer/director of last week’s SANDOW (Episode #693), where we talk extensively about that film, another feature film he produced called PARALLEL, and even a little bit about FIRST BLOOD. You can listen to the full interview publicly for a limited time at patreon.com/onemoviepunch. While you’re there, sign up at any level to maintain access to our exclusive content, along with becoming eligible for Sponsor Sundays. All contributions go to paying our expenses and will help us to grow with our audience. A promo about Sponsor Sundays will run before the review.
    Subscribe to stay current with the latest releases.
    Contribute at Patreon for exclusive content.
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    Here we go!
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    Today’s movie is TROOP ZERO (2019), the feel-good family film directed by Katie Ellwood and Amber Templemore-Finlayson, who go by the moniker Bert & Bertie, and written for the screen by Lucy Alibar. The film follows Christmas Flint (Mckenna Grace), a misfit girl in 1970’s rural Georgia, who learns about an opportunity to be recorded for NASA’s Golden Record, and sent out with Voyager 1, as long as she is the winning Birdie Scout troop at the upcoming talent show. After being rejected by the local troop, she assembles a ragtag group of kids to form Troop Zero, and take their shot at interstellar glory.
    No spoilers.
    Feel-good films are important. We probably don’t review enough feel-good films here at One Movie Punch. Part of that is because our critics, on the whole, tend towards dramas and genre films, at least genres that aren’t explicitly feel-good. But a larger part of that is the lack of quality feel-good cinema being produced. I mean, there are plenty of family films being produced, especially for the streaming markets, but very few of the classic feel-good family films make it to the big screen anymore, outside of the animated features from the big name distributors. The question is why?
    I think that falls into two categories. First, the old theater to VOD to streaming pipeline is in the middle of another shakeup as the remaining streaming giants are brought online. Even as theaters are offering their own versions of the MoviePass model, more and more features that don’t require a theatrical experience are being moved to streaming services. In some cases, like last week’s TOGO (Episode #690), it might be the case of leaving money on the table, since at least two scenes would have been incredible on the big screen. But perhaps with today’s film, it might have saved money that would otherwise have been lost in distribution. That’s not to say TROOP ZERO is a bad film, just not a great candidate for the theater, but still an excellent feature for the streaming market.
    TROOP ZERO feels built off the template of feel-good family features of the 1980s and 1990s, especially the immense family film home markets. It has

    • 11 min
    Episode 696 - The Wild Boys (2017)

    Episode 696 - The Wild Boys (2017)

    Hi everyone!
    Now that we’ve caught up on most of our award nominations, I’m going to close out the quarter on Saturdays with a continuation of our Under the Kanopy series. Kanopy is a library and university funded streaming service that grants card holders and students six free streams per month, from a variety of classic, international, and independent films. They also have streaming agreements with excellent distributors, like A24 and Kino Lorber, who often produce and distribute the critically acclaimed, if not commercially successful films. Today’s movie is a surrealistic look at gender in all its forms – biological, cultural, social, personal – however you define it, this film will both resonate and challenge, in an almost pure art house fashion. It’s also definitely not safe for work or for kids, which I’ll mention again at the top of the review.
    Before the review, we’ll have a promo from our good friends at the Book of Lies Podcast. Every week, Brandi Fleeks and Sunni Hepburn take a look at a fraud case or famous con artist, breaking down the methods, the signals, and how to spot similar scams in your life. You can find them on Twitter @Bookofliespod and on Facebook and Instagram @bookofliespodcast. Be sure to like, retweet, share, review, and subscribe!
    Subscribe here to stay current with the latest releases.
    Contribute at Patreon for exclusive content.
    Connect with us over social media to continue the conversation.
    Here we go!
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    Today’s movie is THE WILD BOYS(2017), or in the French, LES GARÇONS SAUVAGES, the surrealist art house drama written and directed by Bertrand Mandico. After the brutal murder of a woman on La Réunion, five young men (all played by women) are taken from their wealthy families by a Dutch captain (Sam Louwyck) for rehabilitation, on an island that begins to affect their gender, in all its forms. And then stuff gets really weird.
    No spoilers.
    However, a content warning for sexual assault and pervasive sexual themes for the film itself.
    When I first saw the listing for THE WILD BOYS on Rotten Tomatoes, I immediately thought about the novel of the same name by Williams S. Burroughs, the notorious Beat Generation author. In the novel, Burroughs depicts a future gay youth movement intent on the downfall of modern society. I’m a huge fan of Burroughs, nurtured by a combination of his spoken word album produced in part with Michael Franti entitled “Spare Ass Annie and Other Tales”, along with a deeply affecting viewing of 1991’s NAKED LUNCH from David Cronenberg, my first real look at art house and surrealist cinema. I greatly appreciate the way he wrote about being bisexual, often challenging his readers and society in general with works that test the boundaries of good taste, but also smash the boundaries of LGBTQ inclusion in literature.
    THE WILD BOYS, today’s film, is not an adaptation of that novel. However, it does play with gender in many of the same ways. Gay men often mis-gender themselves and each other, calling each other queens and girl and bitch and other female terms. A lot of this self-identification comes from not conforming to the previously established, heteronormative gender roles, wanting to separate themselves from the toxic masculinity. We used to see sex and gender as an either/or, instead of the non-linear spectrum and incredible diversity in both sex and gender we understand today. Burroughs didn’t have the vocabulary back then to talk about gender fluidity, but his novels and characters would sometimes transform from male to female, and back again, and into inexplicable additional genders. Just another groundbreaking aspect of Burroughs’ work. So, it’s hard not to see today’s film at least partially inspired by the novel, as David Bowie, Joy Division, and Patti Smith were all inspired by the same work.
    I find the

    • 9 min
    Episode 695 - Color Out Of Space (2019)

    Episode 695 - Color Out Of Space (2019)

    Hi everyone!
    So, here’s the thing. And yes, it’s Friday, so that means Fantastic Fest and Andrew Campbell and all of that but let me just say that I am supremely jealous that Andrew got a chance to see this film, because as he alluded to in last week’s episode, I am a huge fan of H.P. Lovecraft. Not the barely concealed racism or the other quite valid social and cultural criticisms of the man and his work, but for the absolutely unique mix of gothic horror, scientific advancement, dread of the unknown, and a wholly cosmic perspective. Or as I said last week, [UNINTELLIGIBLE]. I’m going to check out this film at some point, but until then, here’s Andrew’s thoughts on this Lovecraft adaptation.
    Before the review, we’ll have a promo from our good friends at the Comics in Motion podcast. Every week, Dave and Chris look at a film which made its way from the comic book page to the silver screen, and sometimes even back again. They look at the lore, the rendition, and everything related, delivering a fun look at each film. You can find them on Twitter and Instagram @comicsinmotionp and on Facebook @ComicsInMotionPodcast. They were some of our biggest supporters last year, and we can’t thank them enough!
    Subscribe to stay current with the latest releases.
    Contribute at Patreon for exclusive content.
    Connect with us over social media to continue the conversation.
    Here we go!
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    Hello film fans!
    Andrew here. Back today with the promised second of my two back-to-back Lovecraftian features. And it does not get any more Lovecraft than today’s film which is based on Lovecraft short story published in a science fiction magazine nearly 100 hundred years ago. Did you get a chance to check out the subtle, unyielding terror of STARFISH (Episode #688) after my review last week? Well, despite the common thematic threads that tie the two films together, the actual viewing experiences are polar opposites. STARFISH was understated and full of hidden meaning.
    But this one? Oh, this one has Nic Cage!
    I’m one of those film-goers that goes out of his way to avoid trailers. Thanks to Jeff Cannata of the /Filmcast for showing me the light of the quote “unsullied” viewing experience several years ago. In this case, if I had seen the trailer, I would never have watched this film. Honestly, the trailer is so rough and full of schlocky dialogue and cheap special effects, that you might want to avoid it as well. The trailer even invokes “the return of director Richard Stanley” who 25 years ago was infamously fired from directing THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU which was later completed and universally panned.
    That said...
    Today’s movie is COLOR OUT OF SPACE(2019), written by Scarlett Amaris and director Richard Stanley. COLOR OUT OF SPACE stars Nicolas Cage as Nathan Garner, a family man who has left the big city rat race to move his wife Theresa (Joely Richardson) and children out to rural Massachusetts where they of course plan to work from home and raise a herd of alpacas. Not too long after arriving, a meteorite crashes into their yard, emitting an unearthly glow of a color no one can seem to describe (it’s purple). Overnight, the rock turns to dust and whatever energy was inside begins to permeate the water table, causing the plant-life to blossom in otherworldly ways. Slowly, the family begins to fall under the influence as well and madness descends upon the farm.
    The performance by Cage is that of a virtuoso. The Gardners’ tween son Jack (Julian Hilliard) begins to hear a voice at the bottom of the well, while his witchcraft-loving teenage daughter Lavinia (Madeleine Arthur) seems to have the strongest sense that something is infecting their quaint farm. We get to see Cage as the straight man, doubting that anything is amiss and being a little too cool with a glowing meteorite on his property. As he

    • 9 min
    Episode 694 - Wounds (2019)

    Episode 694 - Wounds (2019)

    Hi everyone!
    We are legally obligated to welcome back Shane Hyde to the podcast, a condition of the One Movie Punch Secret Volcano Lair Accords signed last year in the wake of Reign of Terror 2019. If you want the full details, be sure to check out last year’s month-long event, beginning with One Movie Spouse’s review for CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME? (Episode #594), and continuing all through October 2019. A month worth of Shane’s sultry voice, and secret machinations. He’ll be up for a Hulu Original film, at least in the United States, and apparently Netflix everywhere else. Strange times we live in!
    Before the review, we’ll have a promo from our friends at the Pop Pour Review podcast! Every week, the PPR crew review a film, then craft a cocktail based on the movie. I don’t drink myself, but I know a few people that do, and every recipe fits in surprising ways. You can find them on Twitter and Instagram @poppourreview, or by searching for Pop! Pour! Review Podcast on Facebook. Thanks for all your support last year!
    Subscribe to stay current with the latest releases.
    Contribute at Patreon for exclusive content.
    Connect with us over social media to continue the conversation.
    Here we go!
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    Kia ora!
    I’m Shane Hyde, a Kiwi living in Australia. Everything down here is currently on fire, so I’m staying inside and reviewing movies. Today I’m reviewing 2019’s WOUNDS. Let’s go.
    Today’s movie is WOUNDS(2019), directed and written for the screen by Babak Anvari. This movie stars Armie Hammer, Zazie Beetz, Karl Glusman, Christine Rankins, all putting in great turns with regards to the acting. First up, WOUNDS is the story of Will (Armie Hammer), he’s a barkeep on the late shift, who breaks up a fight, finds a cellphone, and then finds things starting to spiral out of control.
    No spoilers! No spoilers! You’re the spoilers!
    I gotta admit my joyous surprise with WOUNDS. As I feel it's not the film it advertises itself as. In the first act, it feels a bit like standard fare, you know, a number of relationships and conflicts (shall we say 'wounds'?). These are established, dominos set in place, and then the finding of a lost cellphone that sets everything off - and what a crazy ride WOUNDS is to its endings, both literal and figurative.
    WOUNDS is based on a novel The Visible Filth by Nathan Ballingrud. WOUNDS has a similar world-building feel to RESOLUTION or THE ENDLESS (Episode #273). As our protagonist Will investigates the lost cellphone, we see and feel The True World unfold around him in unanticipated and unexpected ways. And I gotta try real hard NOT to spoil stuff here, because our protagonist was living a shallow and selfish life, but as he dives deeper into his entanglements, he becomes unstrung, and we feel that confusion along with him, such is the world building.
    Director Babak Anvari rose to prominence with an Iranian horror film: UNDER THE SHADOW (2016). Now, that was a chilling and complex horror story set in war-torn Tehran in the 1980s. WOUNDS is an impressive successor to that. It’s low budget but filled with talent in front of and behind the camera. Both films mark Babak Anvari as a 'director of choice' - somebody whose career I'll be following with some joy and anticipation.
    And in this, there are echoes of Koji Shiraishi's NOROI: THE CURSE (2005). We are as lost as our protagonist as he tries to get to the bottom of things. His understanding only coming when he eventually gives in to everything that he's struggled against. And for all of this, WOUNDS avoids  a lot of the tropes that you might expect.
    WOUNDS touts itself as a psychological horror, and for three quarters of the film that's about right. For the last quarter... well, I’ll leave you to make up your own mind about that one. WOUNDS is the rug pulled out from under your feet. Existential nightmare dresse

    • 7 min
    Episode 693 - Sandow (2018)

    Episode 693 - Sandow (2018)

    Hi everyone!
    We’re back with another Indie Wednesday here at One Movie Punch. Every Wednesday, I’ll be reviewing an independent or microbudget movie that doesn’t get a lot of attention. Sometimes that means we find a diamond in the rough. Sometimes that means we learn the real and/or perceived limits on filmmaking. But we’ll always be discovering something new, even if that means looking at an older subject.
    Today film is 2018’s SANDOW, written and directed by Alexander Cooper, who I had the pleasure to sit down with to discuss the film. Instead of including trailer segments, I’ll be running the full trailer prior to the review, then adding segments from our interview throughout the review. The full interview will be available on our Patreon feed, where we talk about his first film as producer, PARALLEL, and a little bit about Rambo. Head over to patreon.com/onemoviepunch if you want to hear the interview before it disappears behind the pay wall, and sign up to contribute at any level. All contributions go to paying our expenses and will help us grow with our audience.
    Subscribe to stay current with the latest releases.
    Contribute at Patreon for exclusive content.
    Connect with us over social media to continue the conversation.
    Here we go!
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    Today’s movie is SANDOW (2018), the epic historical drama directed by Alexander Cooper and written for the screen in collaboration with Gerard Muarez. The film follows the life of the famous strongman, Eugen Sandow (Timo Kervinen), as seen through the eyes of his pupil, Launceston Elliott (Alexander Cooper). We’re introduced to Sandow’s hopes and dreams, their fulfillment, and the often-sordid life that followed, particularly with his wife Blanche (Tiffany Ellen-Robinson).
    No spoilers.
    In our full interview, I mention how recently I reviewed a film called BE NATURAL: THE UNTOLD STORY OF ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ (Episode #657), which covered not only Alice Guy-Blaché, but the rise of the fledgling film industry in Paris and the Eastern United States at the turn of the century. While Guy-Blaché was experimenting with telling stories with film, however, other filmmakers were busy capturing the wonders of the world, much like the YouTube videos of today. And one of the most famous films captured in those early days by Thomas Edison was circus strongman Eugen Sandow, the subject of today’s film.
    SANDOW takes a very sweeping look at Eugen Sandow, a combination biopic and documentary, from his early years dreaming of being something greater than himself, all the way to his grave at Putney Vale. He wasn’t just a circus and vaudevillian strongman, but also pioneered many major industries of today, including fitness clubs/gyms, athletic supplements, and even a form of professional wrestling, aimed more towards showmanship than actual fighting. And while we get a taste of all of that, we’re also getting a dramatized version of his larger story.
    ALEX: “Yeah, SANDOW is not an accurate portrayal of what would have happened in his life, but it's more like a, it's a bit of a philosophical musing on a historical figure who has had a huge impact. The whole thing about SANDOW really came from... it was an article I read on the Internet about forgotten newsmakers. I had this sort of image in my mind when I read his story and what a superstar he was. He's known by people but forgotten by most. It was a fascinating story and I found these images of these traveling circus strongmen, and I thought, these were kind of like rock stars before rock stars came about. And I thought, 'Wow! What a thing! These guys were going around with circuses and putting on shows and this was before, like, Arnie was flexing his muscles in Hollywood.'”
    The further we go back in history, the harder it is to really know what is and isn’t true about historical figures. History is often

    • 11 min

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