151 episodes

A show about the natural world and how we use it. We explore science, energy, environmentalism, and reflections on how we think about and depict nature, and always leave time for plenty of goofing off.

Hosted by Sam Evans-Brown. Outside/In is a production of New Hampshire Public Radio.

Learn more at outsideinradio.org

Outside/I‪n‬ New Hampshire Public Radio

    • Natural Sciences
    • 4.8 • 1K Ratings

A show about the natural world and how we use it. We explore science, energy, environmentalism, and reflections on how we think about and depict nature, and always leave time for plenty of goofing off.

Hosted by Sam Evans-Brown. Outside/In is a production of New Hampshire Public Radio.

Learn more at outsideinradio.org

    The Acorn: An Ohlone Love Story

    The Acorn: An Ohlone Love Story

    In the early 1900s, an Ohlone woman named Isabel Meadows was recorded describing her longing to eat acorn bread again. She detailed the bread’s flavor; the jelly-like texture; the crispy edges; the people who made it. And she talked about the bread’s place in the creation story of her tribe. A century later, a young Ohlone man named Louis Trevino came across the recordings and recognized Meadows as an ancestor from his community. Today, Trevino and his Ohlone partner, Vincent Medina, are on a journey to bring acorn bread, and the language and traditions connected to it, back to the Ohlone people.

    The Acorn: An Ohlone Love Story is a documentary about Ohlone food, language, and history. But, ultimately, it is a story about Ohlone strength and homeland, the landscape that stretches from the Bay Area of California to Monterey and Big Sur. And at the heart of this story are acorns.

    Links

    Michelle Macklem

    Zoe Tennant

    Cafe Ohlone

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    • 35 min
    Ask Sam: Do Hummingbirds Sleep and Other Questions

    Ask Sam: Do Hummingbirds Sleep and Other Questions

    Another edition of Ask Sam, where Sam answers listener questions about the natural world. This time, questions about hugging trees, bumpy roads, objects stuck on power lines, and epic hummingbird battles.

    Featuring special guests, Maddie Sofia, host of NPR's Short Wave, and Kendra Pierre-Louis, climate journalist with Gimlet's How to Save a Planet.

    Also featuring Ferris Jabr, Stephen Morris, Greg Bruton, and Anusha Shankar.

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    • 29 min
    I Would Prefer Not To

    I Would Prefer Not To

    A lot of us may feel like our time and attention is not our own, and can easily disappear into the ether of work and the internet. But rather than merely suggesting a digital detox, Jenny Odell presents a third way.

    In her book How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy, Jenny draws on ecology, art, labor history, and literature, seeking a deeper kind of attention: an attention that probes our sense of selfhood, our relationship to place, time, and other species. An attention that reminds us of our being animal on this planet.

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    • 38 min
    Thin Green Line

    Thin Green Line

    When producer/reporter Dan Taberski collected data about the long-running reality TV show Cops, he found that it depicts a distorted version of America: Where nearly all crime is associated with violence, drugs, or prostitution, and nearly every police encounter ends in arrest.

    There’s another reality TV show about law enforcement called North Woods Law. It follows state conservation officers employed by New Hampshire’s Fish & Game Department. But on North Woods Law, you’re more likely to see an injured loon than an honest-to-goodness arrest.

    If COPS presents a world more dangerous than reality, North Woods Law presents something else. But what?

    Featuring Jamiles Lartey, William Browne, Erika Billerbeck, Colin Woodard, Colonel Kevin Jordan, Dan Taberski, and Scott Rouleau.

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    • 41 min
    If You Wanna Get Kosileg, You Gotta Get a Little Friluftsliv

    If You Wanna Get Kosileg, You Gotta Get a Little Friluftsliv

    For many of us during the pandemic, the dark and cold of winter brings a special sense of dread. But it’s not just this year: the seasonal darkness often collectively takes us by surprise. Like clockwork, we forget how dark and cold it gets - and it turns out, there are reasons for that.

    But our perception of the seasonal darkness can also be influenced by our attitudes about it.

    In Norway, cultural ideas around winter help shape attitudes and experiences of the cold.

    The Outside/In winter fund drive is nearly over, and we’re almost to our goal of 100 donors! Visit outsideinradio.org/donate to support the show - and vote on the topic of a potential bonus episode if we reach our goal.

    First, there’s the idea of getting cozy, or kosileg. Think candles, slippers, the glow of a fire in the window on a snowy night, eating wood-fired pizza under the stars, or “the smell of baked goods and the Christmas tree,” said Anders Folleras, college friend of Sam Evans-Brown and honorary Outside/In Norwegian cultural attaché.

    Koselig is the Norwegian analogue of the Danish idea of hygge. But there’s another concept that goes hand-in-hand with koselig: friluftsliv.

    “Being outdoorsy, I’d say,” said Folleras. “Outdoor lifestyle.”

    Embracing friluftsliv means open-air living, or getting outside every day, and outdoor adventures for all ages.

    So, we think if you really want to get koselig, you’ve gotta get a little friluftsliv too.

    For a full list of the suggestions we mentioned in this episode, visit the episode post on outsideinradio.org.

    • 42 min
    Coal and Solar in the Navajo Nation

    Coal and Solar in the Navajo Nation

    This week, we’re featuring an episode from A Matter of Degrees, a podcast about climate change hosted by Dr. Leah Stokes and Dr. Katherine Wilkinson. This episode was reported by Julian Brave NoiseCat.

    The energy transition isn’t going to be a one-size-fits-all process. In this episode, a broad lesson gleaned from a very specific story: the effort to move from coal to solar in the Navajo nation.

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    Support Outside/In by making a donation in our year end fund drive

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
1K Ratings

1K Ratings

Ayeattslonske ,

Love it

I forget how I came across this podcast since I don’t live in New Hampshire, but it’s been a staple of my listening ever since ❤️ Astrology, racism in the history of pools/swimming, storm changing, deadly mushroom foraging— I have truly learned so much. Thank you, thank you!

ericafrales ,

This show brings me so much joy

Thanks for all the work you guys do!! Shows are funny and chock full of information.

mlmartel96 ,

Love this!

This is one of the most informative, yet lighthearted podcasts that I’ve listened to!

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