168 episodes

Outside's longstanding literary storytelling tradition comes to life in audio with features that will both entertain and inform listeners. We launched in March 2016 with our first series, Science of Survival, which was developed in partnership with PRX, distributors of the idolized This American Life and The Moth Radio Hour, among others. We have since expanded our show and now offer a range of story formats, including interviews with the biggest figures in sports, adventure, and politics, as well as reports from our correspondents in the field.

Outside Podcast Outside Podcast

    • Wilderness
    • 4.5 • 1.4K Ratings

Outside's longstanding literary storytelling tradition comes to life in audio with features that will both entertain and inform listeners. We launched in March 2016 with our first series, Science of Survival, which was developed in partnership with PRX, distributors of the idolized This American Life and The Moth Radio Hour, among others. We have since expanded our show and now offer a range of story formats, including interviews with the biggest figures in sports, adventure, and politics, as well as reports from our correspondents in the field.

    Two Wild Trips with Surprisingly Happy Endings

    Two Wild Trips with Surprisingly Happy Endings

    When we embark on a big adventure outdoors, the truth is that we rarely know what we’re getting into. Usually, the reasons we give for taking a trip are rarely what make it so memorable. You might go into the mountains with dreams of perfect powder turns but come away marveling about something you saw in the sky. These novel experiences and surprises are why so many of us keep going back. In this episode, we share a pair of stories about people finding unexpected delight in the wilderness—having remarkable days that they didn’t really plan for and that changed them in ways they never imagined. Because after the year we’ve all had, it feels good to hear about better times and be reminded of the kinds of decisions that lead to the most enlightening moments. // This episode of the Outside Podcast is brought to you by Sonos, maker of the Sonos Move, a portable smart speaker that delivers detailed sound and rich base in every kind of room and outdoors. Learn more about why it makes the perfect gift this holiday season at Sonos.com

    • 37 min
    How BASE Jumping Saved Jeb Corliss's Life

    How BASE Jumping Saved Jeb Corliss's Life

    Jeb Corliss is one of the original madmen of BASE jumping. For more than two decades, he flung himself from the top of massive waterfalls, bridges, and skyscrapers, and managed to miraculously survive multiple crash landings in a sport that rarely gives second chances. But now he’s 44, and no longer chasing the edge of risk. Instead, Corliss has embarked on a journey into the depths of his own troubled mind. And he’s reached a surprising conclusion: BASE jumping, one of the most deadly sports on earth, may have been the thing that kept him alive. Outside contributor Daniel Duane traveled to Southern California to talk to Corliss about his latest high-wire act. *This episode of the Outside Podcast is brought to you by Bose, maker of the new Bose Frames Tempo, high-performance sports sunglasses that deliver high quality audio. It’s the sound you expect from Bose with everything you need from sport sunglasses. Learn more about how they can elevate your running and cycling at bose.com.

    • 42 min
    Latria Graham’s Love Letter to Black Adventurers

    Latria Graham’s Love Letter to Black Adventurers

    In the past couple of years, South Carolina–based writer Latria Graham has published a pair of essays in Outside magazine about the challenges that Black people face in the outdoors. Both stories generated a great deal of attention to this matter and also spurred a number of readers to write to her to ask questions, as well as share their own personal experiences. For Graham, one category of letters proved to be a heavy burden: those from people of color asking her advice on where they could be safe and welcome in outdoor spaces. Unsure of how to respond, she said nothing for a long time. But after many months of reckoning with the national movement for racial justice in America, she was ready to give her answer. This episode of the Outside Podcast is brought to you by L.L. Bean, your source for ready-for-anything outerwear this winter. Outside podcast listeners get $10 off online purchases of $75 or more between November 11 and December 6, 2020. Go to llbean.com and enter the promo code OUTSIDE at checkout.

    • 32 min
    How a Fight over Trees Transformed American Politics

    How a Fight over Trees Transformed American Politics

    It wasn’t all that long ago that protecting the environment was an issue considered to be above partisanship. In 1970, it was Richard Nixon who announced the formation of the Environmental Protection Agency and signed the Clean Air Act into law. So how did the environment become one of the most divisive issues in American politics? The answer is a fight over trees. In the 1990s, a fierce confrontation in the Pacific Northwest pitted loggers against activists and scientists trying to defend ancient forests. As it escalated into a national debate, it created new battle lines that would define decades of conflicts over everything from fracking to climate change. In this first episode of the new podcast series Timber Wars, journalist Aaron Scott of Oregon Public Broadcasting explains how it all got started—and why we’re still having the same fight in 2020. This episode of the Outside Podcast is brought to you by Bose, maker of the new Bose Frames Tempo, high-performance sports sunglasses that deliver high quality audio. It’s the sound you expect from Bose with everything you need from sport sunglasses. Learn more about how they can elevate your running and cycling at bose.com .

    • 37 min
    A Snowboarder's Quest to Get Out the Vote

    A Snowboarder's Quest to Get Out the Vote

    For many years, Jeremy Jones had a simple job: he was the king of freeride snowboarding, traveling the planet to carve lines down jagged peaks for action films. But then he began to notice changes in the mountains he was visiting: less snow, shrinking glaciers, and other signs that matched what scientists were saying about the growing menace of climate change. After struggling for a way to respond, he founded an organization to do something about it, Protect Our Winters. Over the past 13 years, POW has become an influential force in the outdoor industry and on Capitol Hill, arguing that rising global temperatures will decimate snow sports, which pump tens of billions of dollars into the U.S. economy. Now, in the run-up to the 2020 presidential election, Jones and POW are hoping to unleash the political might of what they call the Outdoor State, the 50 million Americans united by a shared passion for our natural playgrounds, energizing them to vote on behalf of the climate.This episode of the Outside podcast is brought to you by Whoop, the fitness tracker that gets you training smarter by giving you feedback on every moment of your day. For a limited time, Outside Podcast listeners get 15 percent off a membership; just enter the code OUTSIDE at checkout.

    • 27 min
    The Climbers Speaking Up About Eating Disorders

    The Climbers Speaking Up About Eating Disorders

    To become an elite climber, you need to get very good at defying gravity. This requires developing extraordinary control of your body while also maximizing your strength to weight ratio. To do that, you train constantly and also pay attention to your diet. At the upper echelons of the sport, where every move counts, there’s pressure on athletes to do all they can to make themselves stronger, while also getting smaller and lighter. For professional climbers Kai Lightner and Beth Rodden, that pressure led them both to develop eating disorders. Rodden was a major figure in traditional climbing in the early 2000s, when she helped push the discipline forward. Lightner is a top sport climber who’s currently active in competitions. But while they come from different eras, they faced similar challenges. Both of them recently wrote essays for Outside about their hard times and their recovery. In this episode, they open up about their journeys and talk about the need to change damaging beliefs about weight and food that are deeply embedded in the culture of the sport. This episode of the Outside Podcast is brought to you by Bose, maker of the new Bose Frames Tempo, high-performance sports sunglasses that deliver high quality audio. It’s the sound you expect from Bose with everything you need from sport sunglasses. Learn more about how they can elevate your running and cycling at bose.com .

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
1.4K Ratings

1.4K Ratings

robinson-science-2018 ,

Rachel - you and your lady hunters are amazing.

I love that you’re out there busting stereotypes. Just like me (an old white guy trying not to be an a-hole. You're right that there-is a natural connection b/w hunting culture and food culture. But also togeneral outdoor culture as well. When i first got into hiking, backpacking. And realized that hunters groups can be quite powerful but still generally shared my opinion about protecting wild lands and open space and keeping access available

I’ve never been Hunting, but like you am intrigued to know if i could do it.

I‘m embarrassed as a human that you felt vulnerable for even a moment when on your trip and

wearechampions ,

Lady Hunter Show

I really like the Outside podcast and this one is good in many ways but my god, when you are doing a show like this, please try not to use the word “like” in virtually every sentence. So tiresome! And it detracts from what you are trying to express.

cynthiaf16 ,

Look forward to it!

This is one of the podcasts that I look forward to. They have very interesting topics and conversations. Keep it up!

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