125 episodes

Would you like to know more about the art of twenty-first century "cool stuff" that's changing our world? Such as: robots, space exploration, new media, wearable technology and other innovations that will be making people go, "Wow!" in the future? Along with the ways new technologies, new ways of thinking and new opportunities are influencing social change? Two Maverix® Multimedia presents Over Coffee®. Arts-oriented STEAM enthusiast Dot Cannon used to daydream through science class and dread math class. And now, she sees how both of these can be painless when applied to making wearables, programming robots, telling a spacecraft what to do or creating a VR entertainment experience. She and her interview guests will show you how the intersection of art and science can mean opportunities to express your creativity, find new resources for learning, and see what's coming next.

Over Coffee® | Stories and Resources from the Intersection of Art and Science | Exploring How to Make STEAM Work For You Dot Cannon: Public Speaker & New-Media Reporter

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 10 Ratings

Would you like to know more about the art of twenty-first century "cool stuff" that's changing our world? Such as: robots, space exploration, new media, wearable technology and other innovations that will be making people go, "Wow!" in the future? Along with the ways new technologies, new ways of thinking and new opportunities are influencing social change? Two Maverix® Multimedia presents Over Coffee®. Arts-oriented STEAM enthusiast Dot Cannon used to daydream through science class and dread math class. And now, she sees how both of these can be painless when applied to making wearables, programming robots, telling a spacecraft what to do or creating a VR entertainment experience. She and her interview guests will show you how the intersection of art and science can mean opportunities to express your creativity, find new resources for learning, and see what's coming next.

    Space and Imagination

    Space and Imagination

    Due to a family emergency, we are reposting one of our most popular 2021 episodes. Please enjoy this rebroadcast and we'll look forward to resuming our current episodes next week.















    Quick! Who was your favorite teacher in high school?







    If you ask middle-school students in Milton, Georgia, a lot of them might answer, "Mr. Jones".







    That's because Steve Jones, The Space Teacher, is all about learning by exploring and experimenting.







    Steve, who teaches STEAM at Hopewell Middle School in Milton, Georgia, is a lifelong space-science enthusiast.  He is both a NASA Solar System Ambassador and freelance Principal Investigator for experiential STEM learning organization Magnitude.io.







    And if you try something and fail--that's fantastic.







    In this March, 2021 nterview with Steve, he discussed his passion for space and space science, the ways he incorporates those into his classes to capture students' interest, and some of his favorite educational resources.







    On this edition of Over Coffee®, we cover:







    * How the space program first sparked Steve’s imagination;







    * Why Steve (who originally didn’t care much for math!) came to incorporate it into his passion for science;







    * The best creative challenge that faced Steve, in interesting non-science-oriented students in science;







    * How Steve’s unusual perspective on failure in his classes encourages students in engineering;







    * One of Steve’s favorite STEAM lessons from the NASA JPL Solar System Ambassador program;







    * A new experiment which the students are doing in cooperation with NASA and Miami’s Fairchild Botanical Garden;







    * How Steve gave the students ownership of their own creativity on this particular project;







    * What first started Steve off as a STEAM teacher, when beginning his career in education;







    * The work of Magnitude.io and how Steve first became involved in the program;







    * How Steve’s seventh-grade class began research with Magnitude.io’s ExoLab 6 experiment;























































































    * How to get involved in the Magnitude.io program, if you are an educator;















    * One “failure” that led to better research in Steve’s science class;















    * Some additional educational resources, including Zooniverse, which relates science to various arts and humanities topics among its citizen science exploration.

    • 42 min
    Ingenuity Beyond Imagination

    Ingenuity Beyond Imagination

    The first black-and-white image from NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, April 19, 2021. (Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL, and used with permission.)







    This podcast and blog are not, in any way, affiliated with, nor endorsed by, NASA nor the Jet Propulsion Lab.







    For NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, the original plan was, simply, a technology demonstration.







    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Robotics Technologist Gerik Kubiak and his colleagues created the four-pound helicopter for an experimental test flight, according to JPL's website. Their goals: to demonstrate miniaturized technology in an autonomous aircraft while establishing whether the little helicopter could survive Mars' environment.







    And the ultimate objective? Initially, according to JPL's fact sheet, scientists hoped to have Ingenuity perform up to five test flights, in thirty Martian days.







    Fast-forward to today. So far, Ingenuity has flown a total of thirteen test flights.







    Since arriving on the Martian surface aboard the Mars Perseverance Rover in February, 2021, Ingenuity has steadily "pushed the envelope". Her inaugural flight, on April 19th, lasted just over 39 seconds, as Ingenuity climbed to a prescribed maximum height, then hovered 10 feet above the Martian surface.







    NASA;s flight log shows Ingenuity's flight times and distances progressively lengthening.







    May 7, 2021, marked Ingenuity's fifth successful flight. Designed to fly for ninety seconds, Ingenuity has exceeded that figure numerous times during her test flights. At the time of our conversation, her longest logged flight was the twelfth: 169.4 seconds.







    And the miniature helicopter (which,, NASA says, weighs less than two pounds on Mars!) has been sending back both black-and-white and color images of her groundbreaking journeys.







    On the day of Ingenuity's twelfth flight, Gerik talked about the process of designing the spacecraft, shared a closer look at the missions and discussed his favorite moments as Ingenuity made spaceflight history.















    On thie edition of Over Coffee® we cover:







    * How Gerik first became involved in the robotics field, as his professional path;







    * How he began, working with the Ingenuity helicopter;







    * Some of the challenges involved, in preparing Ingenuity to fly on Mars;







    * A closer look at the technology that's enabling Ingenuity to fly;







    * Gerik's recollections of the first day Ingenuity flew;







    * How the helicopter is communicating, from Mars to Earth;







    * Why Ingenuity's twelfth mission was one of the most challenging;







    * A closer look at the initial mission plans, and the ways in which the helicopter has surpassed them;







    * How the helicopter can "troubleshoot" if a problem occurs;







    * Gerik's favorite part of getting to work on the helicopter and operate it;







    * What he especially enjoyed learning, that he didn't know previously,, about robotics, from operating Ingenuity on Mars;







    * A quick look at some possible future plans;







    * Some of the images that Gerik found most breathtaking;

    • 15 min
    Staying Healthy in Space

    Staying Healthy in Space

    This post and podcast are for informational purposes only, and are not intended as medical advice. Please contact a healthcare professional with any medical questions.







    Photo courtesy of Cooper and O'Hara Photography, and used with permission.







    Like her fellow medical professionals, Dr. Shawna Pandya is focused on keeping patients healthy.







    Unlike many of her colleagues, though, she has to take space dust, zero gravity and radiation into account.







    And as she practices space medicine, she's experienced some of the circumstances her patients will encounter.







    Besides being a physician, Dr. Pandya is a citizen-scientist astronaut with Boulder, Colorado-based Project PoSSUM. This 501c nonprofit uses astronautics to study the role of our upper atmosphere in climate change. {"PoSSUM" is an acronym for "Polar Suborbital Science in the Upper Mesosphere".







    In 2015, Dr. Pandya completed her citizen-astronaut training. She was a member of Project PoSSUM's first crew to test a commercial spacesuit in zero gravity. And today, she serves as Director of Space Medicine for Project PoSSUM.







    A multifaceted career







    She is also Vice-President of Immersive Medicine at Sasketchewan-based virtual-reality pioneer Luxsonic Technologies Inc. In addition, she serves as Director of Medical Research at Orbital Assembly Corporation, the world's first large-scale space-construction company.







    And "so much more", as Dr. Pandya says. She's a chief instructor in Operational Space Medicine for the International Institute for Astronautical Sciences....Medical Advisor for Mission Space Food...a physician with Alberta Health Services...







    And, as you'll see on her website, she's currently working on obtaining her pilot's license, is an aquanaut and has given multiple TEDx speeches.







    Dr. Pandya talked about the conisderations of space medicine, what's involved in keeping the crew healthy, and what's next for her, as a citizen-science astronaut.







    On this edition of Over Coffee® we cover:







    * What first inspired Dr. Pandya's passion for space science;







    * Why "space is trying to kill you", as Dr. Pandya says;







    * What it's like to be in zero gravity!







    * What's involved in mitigaing some of the health risks of space;







    * What Dr. Pandya might pack for travel to the Moon or to Mars;







    * How a medical emergency might be handled, if one occurs in space;







    * A look at the virtual-reality space-medicine training program Dr. Pandya has created, with Luxsonic; Technologies;







    * What the results of Dr. Pandya's space-medicine research can mean, for maintaining good health on Earth;







    * What's next in Dr. Pandya's journey, as a citizen-science astronaut.

    • 21 min
    Engineering “Life-Changing”

    Engineering “Life-Changing”

    This post and podcast are for informational purposes only, and are not intended as medical advice. Please contact a healthcare professional with any medical questions.















    "Every single person that walks in the (exoskeleton) is the best experience," says Wandercraft Co-Founder and CEO Jean-Louis Constanza.







    Paris-based medical device company Wandercraft has developed the world's most advanced robotic exoskeleton, or "exo". Called "Atalante", the exo is self-balancing, designed to emulate a realistic human walk.







    And Atalante allows walking-impaired people to regain mobility--without having to use crutches for balance.







    For Jean-Louis, the innovation started with a question from his then-five-year-old son, Oscar.







    "You're a robotics engineer. Why don't you make a robot (that'll help me walk instead of using a wheelchair)?"







    Jean-Louis began exploring the answer to that question. The ultimate result was seen worldwide.







    On video, Oscar, now in his teens, comments on being "taller than his father", as he walks, wearing the exo.







    Dreams, grounded in reality







    Today, Jean-Louis' dream is that Oscar and his friends may ultimately be walking to their college classes.







    But for Wandercraft there's also a larger vision: a world where wheelchairs become a thing of the past.







    Jean-Louis cautions that these goals aren't yet a reality.







    "(We) don't want to hurt people (by overpromising)," he says. "(But) now we're getting closer to the goal."







    Currently, the exoskeleton is being used in hospitals and rehabiltation facilities, and going through some clinical trials. Jean-Louis and his team are also polling walking-impaired patients. Their question: what, besides walking, might these individuals like to be able to do, while wearing the exo?







    Next steps, Jean-Louis says, include streamlining the exo and getting FDA approval in the U.S. Meanwhile, Oscar has walked twice in the exo--and is waiting for a final product for regular use as he continues with his interests and prepares for college in the next few years.







    Jean-Louis talked about the creation of Wandercraft, previewed some of the ways Adelante is evolving and shared some of his favorite experiences.







    On this edition of Over Coffee®, we cover:







    * How Jean-Louis first discovered his passion for robotics;







    * How Wandercraft, and the Adelante, came about;







    * Some of the challenges involved in creating the exoskeleton;







    * Oscar's experiences walking in the exo;







    * Some of the health challenges affecting people in wheelchairs;







    * How the exoskeleton works (hint: there are several ways a wearer can operate it!);







    * The next steps in the process of developing the exo as a personal device;







    * How the exoskeleton is currently being used;







    * Some of the activities physical therapists and patients are currently suggesting, for exo wearers in the future;







    * What Wandercraft needs most, in terms of support, as they pursue their goals of helping wheelchair users walk;







    * An update on Oscar's activities,

    • 25 min
    Creativity and Your Brain

    Creativity and Your Brain

    This podcast and post are for informational purposes, and are not intended as medical advice. Please contact your medical professional with any clinical questions.







    (Photograph courtesy of Jason Voinov, and used with permission.)







    Your brain and your creativity are static, right? What you were born with, is the best you'll ever have.







    Not true, says cognitive neuroscientist Dr. Julie Fratantoni.







    As Head of Operations for The BrainHealth Project, Dr. Fratantoni leads a team of researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas, Dallas in a groundbreaking study. Her research focuses on ways to train the brain to work more efficiently and last longer.







    In the process, she's giving everyone a closer look at facts versus myths, when it comes to the ways our brains work.







    And the Center for BrainHealth's website says that our brains are "dynamic, adaptable and flexible". Their objectives: to unlock the brain's potential, fortify against decline and even repair brain health.







    Over ten years, The BrainHealth Project teaches participants strategies to optimize their brain's performance. Training is customized to each individual's circumstances. People can opt out at any time, and participation is free.







    Currently, The BrainHealth Project is seeking additional participants. They're recruiting both adults and youth, ages 8-17. And participation is fully virtual.







    In addition to The BrainHealth Project, the Center for BrainHealth offers a number of other resources. Their "Sips & Science Speaker Series" offers monthly presentations on brain science innovations. They also offer apps and virtual training.







    Their core concept: optimizing our brains' performances and improving brain health is well within reach, for everyone. And that would include improving our ability to come up with creative ideas.







    Dr. Fratantoni discussed what brain optimization can mean in terms of boosting creativity, debunked a common myth about the way our brains operate and offered a closer look at The BrainHealth Project.















    On this edition of Over Coffee® we cover:















    * How Dr. Fratantoni first discovered her perception for high-performance brain science;







    * Some of the common misconceptions about the brain and creativity;







    * What's happening in our brains during an "aha" moment;







    * Why "Oh, I'm just not creative" is a myth;







    * A recommendation of a great book about creativity







    * Dr. Fratantoni's own experiences as a scientist whose work enhances her creativity;







    * A closer look at The BrainHealth Project;







    * What's involved, for anyone who'd like to get involved in The BrainHealth Project;







    * An example of one strategy a participant might be taught;

    • 31 min
    "Learning by Hologram"

    "Learning by Hologram"

    When Perception Founder/CEO Dr. Sirisilp Kongsilp first saw VR, he was fascinated.







    And it started him thinking of ways to create something new.







    Today Dr. Kongsilp, or Rabbit, as he prefers to be called (that's what his name means) has just entered into an exciting new partnership, that will benefit students worldwide. And he and his team will be creating new, free resources for educators!







    What Rabbit and his team came up with was desktop AR. This is a plugin to Unity Technologies' platform which allows users to view 3D objects from their computers, with just a pair of red-and-blue glasses!







    In addition, this is a very user-friendly technology that allows creatives to develop and share a 3D app--for free!







    Now, just in time for back-to-school, Bangkok-based holographic company Perception has an exciting new partnership that's going to benefit students worldwide. Again, it's free.







    Rabbit recently announced that Perception has entered into a partnership with the Imperial War Museums, and the Science Museum Group, in London.







    "Together, we will bring holographic exhibitions to more than 20,000 students worldwide" he emailed.







    A look at the museums' websites reveals some seriously cool stuff.







    Coming soon--in 3D







    Imperial War Museums' website lists five museums in their group. Among these are the Churchill War Rooms, which takes visitors inside life during WWII; HMS Belfast, the most significant surviving Second World War Royal Navy warship; and IWM London, which includes the "Extraordinary Heroes" exhibition among its permanent collections.







    Meanwhile, the Science Museum Group is the world's leading group of science museums. Their members include the National Railway Museum, National Science and Media Museum and the Science and Industry Museum.







    We can only imagine all the incredible artifacts which students will get to see, up close, in 3D in the future!







    Rabbit offered a look inside the process of creating museum-artifact holograms for student use, discussed a recent workshop which Perception hosted and shared a contact for educators, worldwide, to get their classrooms involved.







    On this edition of Over Coffee® we cover:







    * How this new partnership came about for Perception;







    * Perception's goals for reaching students;







    * A look at the process of translating museum artifacts into 3D holograms...

    • 22 min

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