128 episodes

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

Overheard at National Geographic National Geographic

    • Science
    • 4.2 • 9.6K Ratings

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

    There’s a Bear in My Backyard

    There’s a Bear in My Backyard

    Sure, we love bears when they show up in books or cartoons. But what if one is outside our window? Human-bear encounters are becoming far more frequent as development continues to spread and people and bears seek similar resources of food, water, and shelter. National Geographic Explorer and large-carnivore ecologist Rae Wynn-Grant dispels a few myths about bear behavior, describes what it’s like to cuddle a bear cub, and offers tips on what to do if you find a bear in your backyard—or bump into one in the wild.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more? 
    If you haven’t seen the viral Instagram video of Rae Wynn-Grant cuddling with bear cubs for science, you can watch that here. 
    And you can keep up with her adventures with more species, like ring-tailed lemurs and African lions, on her website, raewynngrant.com. 
    Or you can also listen to her podcast, Going Wild with Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant, where you can hear her interview fellow conservationists about their work, from studying hyenas in Kenya to coyotes in California.
    Also explore:
    Read Christine Dell’Amore’s piece about how bears and other wild animals have adapted to urban areas across the U.S.
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 33 min
    Playback: The Real-Life MacGyver in Nat Geo's Basement

    Playback: The Real-Life MacGyver in Nat Geo's Basement

    In the basement of National Geographic’s headquarters, there’s a lab holding a secret tech weapon: Tom O’Brien. As Nat Geo’s photo engineer, O’Brien adapts new technologies to capture sights and sounds previously never seen or heard before. In this episode, originally published in June 2021, O’Brien leads us on a tour of his lab as he designs and builds an underwater camera and shows us some of his favorite gadgets—including a camera lens that flew over Machu Picchu in a blimp, a remote camera he designed for the film Free Solo, and a piece of gear known simply as the “funky bird train.”
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    See National Geographic's Pictures of the Year and our five picks for Photographers of the Year. To capture one of the year's best pictures—an encounter with elephants in Gabon—O'Brien outfitted a photographer with 1,100 pounds of custom gear.
    Our photographers capture millions of individual frames per year. In a previous episode of Overheard, Nat Geo's deputy director of photography breaks down the process to select only the best images.
    See photographs mentioned in this episode, including wolves captured by a gnaw-proof camera, sage grouse as seen by the funky bird train, and a cheetah running in super slow motion. Want to see what goes on in Nat Geo’s photo engineering lab? Follow Tom O’Brien on Instagram @mechanicalphoto. And learn more about Tom’s predecessor, Kenji Yamaguchi, who held the job for more than 30 years.
    Also explore:
    Learn more about Jacques Cousteau, who pioneered scuba gear, brought the oceans to life, and jolted people into environmental activism.   
    And hear more about beavers and how they shape the world on a previous Overheard episode, “March of the Beaver.”
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 30 min
    Pictures of the Year

    Pictures of the Year

    Every year, National Geographic rolls the year into a collection of photos for its “Pictures of the Year” issue. It’s a mysterious process, and we’re about to share it with you. We’ll see what baby carriages are like in Greenland, witness the moment SpaceX burst into a cypress swamp, and make a new four-legged friend as deputy director of photography Sadie Quarrier shares with us the choice photos for this year.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Interested in learning more about Kiliii Yüyan? We’ve got an article for you that explores how he became the photographer he is today.
    Also explore
    To see Mac Stone’s photos, take a look at his website, macstonephoto.com. He specializes in photographing swamps, the Everglades, and Florida Bay.
    Plus, Katie Orlinsky’s photos go far beyond tapirs. See some more of the photos she’s taken around the world at katieorlinskyphoto.com.
    For subscribers
    See how we summed up 2022 in the “Pictures of the Year.” It hits newsstands in December.
    Fuel your curiosity with a free one-month trial subscription to Nat Geo Digital. You’ll have unlimited access on any device, anywhere, ad-free with our app that lets you download stories to read off-line. Explore every page ever published with a century of digital archives at your fingertips. Check it all out for free at natgeo.com/exploremore.
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    • 32 min
    Who Inspired Wakanda's Warrior Women?

    Who Inspired Wakanda's Warrior Women?

    The fictional, fearsome, and all-female Dora Milaje in the movie Black Panther: Wakanda Forever were inspired by a real group of African warriors: the Agojie. Nat Geo contributing writer Rachel Jones shares the history of the Agojie and discusses the way that movies and pop culture can shape our understanding of the world.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Learn more and check out photos of the Agojie in Rachel Jones’s article. 
    Also, in 2019 Rachel traveled to the Democratic Republic of Congo to find out how they were combating the Ebola epidemic. 
    Read her pieces on a new tool that some hope could uncover the lost ancestry of enslaved African Americans and on Albert José Jones, who founded the first African American scuba club and led the way for Black divers to explore the ocean—and their own history.
    Also explore:
    Watch the Dora Milaje kick butt in Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, in theaters this Friday, November 11th. 
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 29 min
    Wayfinding Through the Human Genome

    Wayfinding Through the Human Genome

    National Geographic Explorer Keolu Fox grew up hearing stories about his ancestors, Polynesian navigators, and the men who in the late 1970s led the first Hōkūleʻa voyage to Tahiti. As the first Native Hawaiian with a Ph.D. in genomic sciences, Fox tells us how genetic data can help reveal powerful narratives about the history of Indigenous people and their achievements, and empower communities to use data to improve public health and preserve their culture.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Less than one percent of genome studies include Indigenous people. Watch Keolu Fox’s Ted Talk on why genetic research needs to be more diverse. 
    Also, check out his essay in Scientific American on what genomic research could potentially reveal about the history and accomplishments of Indigenous people. 
    Also explore: 
    If you are working on an idea that promotes Indigenous futurism and environmental health, Keolu is collaborating with Footprint Coalition Science Engine to encourage people to apply for grants to help execute their projects. 
    For subscribers: 
    You can read our magazine profile on Keolu and how he hopes to find clues that lead to new medicines, better health care, and even land reclamation.
    Read about how the Polynesian Voyaging Society is trying to keep the art of Polynesian wayfinding alive by sailing around the world on traditional voyaging canoes—and you can also get to know the Hōkūleʻa’s first female captain, National Geographic Explorer Lehua Kamalu. 
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 33 min
    Presenting: Greeking Out by National Geographic Kids

    Presenting: Greeking Out by National Geographic Kids

    National Geographic Kids' Greeking Out is a kid-friendly retelling of some of the best stories from Greek mythology.
    This episode, "Akhenaten The Heretic King," is all about King Tut's father and how he attempted to reset Egyptian religion and politics.
    You can listen to more episodes of Greeking Out on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    We'll be back next week with a regular episode of Overheard.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
9.6K Ratings

9.6K Ratings

mondomando🍺 ,

Great choice of topics.

Makes me more interested in NatGeo organization and magazine.

K_Mick49 ,

Missing Honorifics

Came to the show for the episode with Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant, who was not only introduced without her honorific, but also not titled correctly in the show notes. If you listen to her show “Going Wild”, she clearly discusses the micro-aggressions experienced as a Black female scientist, including the assumption that she couldn’t possibly be all three. I want to give the show 5 stars because I believe it is important information being shared, but 5 stars don’t call out issues needing to be addressed. It’s nearly 2023, come on.

nonprofitguuuuuuuurl ,

So glad I listen!

Sometimes I read a synopsis and I’m not entirely interested, but every time I hit play I’m wowed and intrigued. Really quality work that never fails to capture my interest.

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