144 episodes

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

Overheard at National Geographic National Geographic

    • Science
    • 4.2 • 9.7K Ratings

Come dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations overheard at National Geographic’s headquarters, as we follow explorers, photographers, and scientists to the edges of our big, weird, beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

    Can You Picture That? This Photographer Can and Does

    Can You Picture That? This Photographer Can and Does

    Photographer Mark Thiessen, who’s worked on staff at National Geographic for over 30 years, likens his job to a Swiss army knife—versatile enough to tackle many kinds of assignments. Even when the subject is challenging, he approaches each assignment with a lot of curiosity and creativity, whether it’s shooting smoke jumpers who leap out of planes to fight wildfires or making “rain” in the studio to take a unique portrait of an Explorer. And as a special treat, Thiessen will take us up a flight of stairs from the photo studio to show us one of his favorite hobbies: beekeeping.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Follow Mark on Instagram at @Thiessenphoto. 
    See what it takes to put out a wildfire in this Nat Geo article, and follow smokejumpers out of a plane in this article. 
    Hear more of Mark on the Overheard episode “An Accidental Case of the Blues,” about the discovery of the first blue pigment since Thomas Jefferson was president. 
    Also explore: 
    Did you know that people steal bee hives? Find out why in the Overheard episode “Honeybee Chop Shop.” 
    Want to take better photos at home? Nat Geo staff photographer Becky Hale explains how.
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    • 28 min
    Scenes from Nigeria's Baby Boom

    Scenes from Nigeria's Baby Boom

    With 224 million people, Nigeria is Africa's most populous country. By 2050, it could crack the global top three with some 375 million people. In the second of our two-part series on the global population passing eight billion, National Geographic photographer Yagazie Emezi describes scenes she captured in Lagos, Africa’s biggest city—including intimate close-ups of a family raising four children in a one-room apartment and women receiving prenatal care. Plus, a Nigerian demographer explains how the country's soaring birth rate could make it an economic powerhouse, but only if the country finds new ways to invest in its youthful population.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    See Yagazie Emezi’s photos—and other scenes from a world with 8 billion people—in the April issue of National Geographic.  
    For a previous National Geographic assignment, Yagazie photographed the women stepping up to remake Rwanda. Follow her on Instagram @yagazieemezi.
    Also explore:
    With a get-rich spirit that fuels the continent’s largest economy, see why Lagos has become Africa’s boom town.
    Read more from Akanni Akinyemi, including how Africa will shape the future of the planet’s population. 
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    • 25 min
    What Women in China Want

    What Women in China Want

    There are more than 8 billion humans on Earth, according to the United Nations. And for decades, China has had more people than any other country. But now, China’s population is declining. As soon as this year, it could lose its place as the most populous nation in the world. National Geographic photographer Justin Jin shares what he observed in this pivotal moment for China; he captured scenes where many young women are choosing not to have children, and instead are spending their money on doggie daycare and on karaoke nights with friends and male escorts. As we head into Women’s History Month, we’ll explore why Chinese women are taking a different path, despite the government campaigns pushing them to get married and have children.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard
    Want more?
    See Justin Jin’s photos—and other scenes from a world with 8 billion people—in the April issue of National Geographic.
    Earth's growing population belies vastly different types of demographic change taking shape around the globe. Here’s why demographers don’t agree on what will happen next.
    Also explore:
    Follow Justin on Instagram @Justin.Jin.
    Learn about Chinese propaganda targeting women—and how more women are pushing back—in Leta Hong Fincher’s books Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China and Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 28 min
    The Soul of Music: Meklit Hadero tells stories of migration

    The Soul of Music: Meklit Hadero tells stories of migration

    This episode is part four of The Soul of Music—Overheard’s four-part series focusing on music, exploration, and Black history. Our guest this week is Meklit Hadero, a Nat Geo Explorer and Ethio-jazz musician. Meklit is the creative force behind the transmedia storytelling project Movement, which explores the intersection of migration and music. She and fellow Explorer and music producer Jahawi Bertolli talk about migration, the ancient instruments known as rock gongs, and how their music is inspired by nature.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Learn more about Meklit Hadero and the Movement project at her website meklitmusic.com. You can follow her on Twitter or Instagram @meklitmusic. 
    Learn more about Jahawi Bertolli and his First Rock project on his website jahawi.com. You can follow him on Instagram @jahawibertolli. 
    Check out the Overheard episode “Ancient Orchestra” to learn more about Jahawi and the sound of rock gongs.
    And keep listening to songs featured in The Soul of Music as well as a few bonus tracks in this Spotify playlist. 
    Also explore: 
    Follow FREEK and his music on instagram @freektv. 
    The “star sounds” you heard were provided by Jon Jenkins, co-investigator for data analysis for the Kepler Mission. Learn more about the Kepler Mission and star sonification on their webpage. 
    Learn more about ethio-jazz pioneer Mulatu Astake in this Nat Geo article. 
    Thinking about traveling to Ethiopia? This Nat Geo travel guide can help you plan your trip.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 40 min
    The Soul of Music: Exploring Chief Xian's ancestral memory

    The Soul of Music: Exploring Chief Xian's ancestral memory

    This episode is part three of The Soul of Music—Overheard’s four-part series focusing on music, exploration, and Black history. Our guest this week is Grammy-nominated trumpeter Chief Xian aTunde Adjuah, formerly known as Christian Scott. Chief Xian sits down with National Geographic Explorer and archaeologist Justin Dunnavant to discuss Xian’s childhood in New Orleans, how he created a new instrument, and what he calls stretch music.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Learn more about Chief Xian at his website https://www.chiefadjuah.com/. And you can follow him on Instagram @christianscottofficial. 
    You can also download his stretch music app, an interactive music player, in the Google Play store or Apple App store. 
    Also, be sure to follow Justin online to stay updated with his latest adventures: www.justindunnavant.com or on social media @archfieldnotes. 
    Also explore: 
    Interested in learning more about global Black history and heritage? Follow Justin Dunnavant as he explores Loíza, the ancestral heart and soul of the Afro-Puerto Rican community, in Hulu’s Your Attention Please: Initiative 29.
    Listen to episode 3 of the Into the Depths podcast which includes Justin as a guest.
    Want to travel to New Orleans? Check out Nat Geo’s travel guide for tips on how to make the most of your trip. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 37 min
    The Soul of Music: Sampa The Great returns to her roots

    The Soul of Music: Sampa The Great returns to her roots

    This episode is part two of The Soul of Music—Overheard’s four-part series focusing on music, exploration, and Black history. Our guest this week is Sampa The Great, a Zambian-born rapper, singer, and songwriter. Sampa spent most of her childhood living in Botswana, and her music career took off in Australia; but when the pandemic hit, Sampa returned home to Zambia where she recorded her album As Above, So Below. This album sees Sampa shedding her mask and getting personal. Sampa is joined by Nat Geo Explorer and wildlife biologist Danielle Lee to discuss inspiration through history, the power of language, and mental health therapy through nature.
    For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard.
    Want more?
    Learn more about Sampa The Great at her website sampathegreat.com. You can follow her on Twitter or Instagram @Sampa_the_Great.
    Learn more about Danielle Lee at her website about.me/DNLee. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram at @DNLee5.
    Also explore: 
    Listen to an in-depth interview with Danielle Lee in the Overheard episode “The Wonders of Urban Wildlife.”
    Zambia is home to the impressive Victoria Falls. Learn how you can visit the waterfall in this Nat Geo article. 
    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.
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    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
9.7K Ratings

9.7K Ratings

ShrigBoof ,

Reverse Chronological Order

I hate that Apple doesn’t have a feature that lets you reverse the chronological order the podcast appears in. Super annoying to have to scroll down through 120+ episodes to see the most ones.

Anonymous 147676786 ,

Very good

Super educational

Mrsm1010 ,

Never a dull moment

What a find! Just binged on 3 episodes of amazing and inspiring behind-the-scenes stories with Nat Geo fabulous humans.

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