39 min

Part 2 | Surviving - Featuring Kristin Cox Service Without Sacrifice

    • Business

The things first responders see, the stress they endure, and the hearts they try to mend take a toll. Compartmentalizing is often their strategy, but it’s not a sustainable, long-term solution. In this episode, we focus on Part 2 of my book, “Tell Me My Story - Challenging the Narrative of Service Before Self,” and I’m joined by Kristen Cox, MA, a Behavioral Health Coordinator for the Seattle Fire Department, who has extensive experience in coaching leadership and designing intervention programs. She also happens to be a close friend of mine, someone from whom I have learned many valuable lessons. We discuss why compartmentalizing isn’t sustainable and the impact it has not just on each person but on organizations as a whole. We venture into the responsibility of leaders and companies to create optimal conditions for healing, resilience, and self-compassion. Join us for this powerful conversation, filled with valuable insights and practical strategies to help you navigate the complexities of trauma, resilience, and service. 
Highlights from the Episode:
* The term compartmentalizing has long since worked its way into our everyday lives, especially at work. As a coping strategy, it is “a common default reaction” that is worn as a badge of honor, but it’s not one that serves us well in the long term.
* We tell ourselves stories so we can create meaning out of challenging experiences. These stories go beyond thoughts in our minds; they can activate our sympathetic nervous system. These reactions include “fight, flight, freeze, fix, and fake,” and our brain cannot differentiate between perceived threats and real threats.
* Compartmentalizing as a coping strategy can completely break down under the crushing pressure of stress and trauma, leading to physical and mental exhaustion. This often causes painful conflicts not just at work, but also, in our personal lives and the relationships that mean the most to us.
* When a person’s attempt to compartmentalize breaks down, they are often accompanied by shame and stigma. They’re left isolated, disconnected, and wondering what is wrong with them. Rather than trying to hide these feelings, we should normalize them and provide support.
* Making better choices and healing from trauma is nearly impossible without self-compassion. Self-compassion means you put yourself higher on the list of priorities, recognize the need for self-care and well-being, and actually follow through with it.
* It will take a cultural shift to create more resilient teams, and it begins with prioritizing the well-being of all humans involved. Leaders need skills to manage stress, conflict, and performance issues, and companies must foster psychological safety, connection, and open promotion of mental health.
Resources
Navigating Life’s Sidewalks: A Poetic Reflection on Braking Patterns and Making New Choices by Dimple Dhabalia
Kristin Cox on LinkedIn
Dimple Dhabalia on the web | Instagram | Facebook | LinkedIn | Threads | Substack
Pre-order a copy of Tell Me My Story today!
Want to support this show and my work? Consider becoming a paid subscriber at dear humanitarian on Substack.
If you would like to support the launch of Tell Me My Story, you can learn more at rootsintheclouds.com/launchteam.
Subscribe onApple |Spotify |Amazon |Google


Get full access to dear HUMANitarian at dearhumanitarian.substack.com/subscribe

The things first responders see, the stress they endure, and the hearts they try to mend take a toll. Compartmentalizing is often their strategy, but it’s not a sustainable, long-term solution. In this episode, we focus on Part 2 of my book, “Tell Me My Story - Challenging the Narrative of Service Before Self,” and I’m joined by Kristen Cox, MA, a Behavioral Health Coordinator for the Seattle Fire Department, who has extensive experience in coaching leadership and designing intervention programs. She also happens to be a close friend of mine, someone from whom I have learned many valuable lessons. We discuss why compartmentalizing isn’t sustainable and the impact it has not just on each person but on organizations as a whole. We venture into the responsibility of leaders and companies to create optimal conditions for healing, resilience, and self-compassion. Join us for this powerful conversation, filled with valuable insights and practical strategies to help you navigate the complexities of trauma, resilience, and service. 
Highlights from the Episode:
* The term compartmentalizing has long since worked its way into our everyday lives, especially at work. As a coping strategy, it is “a common default reaction” that is worn as a badge of honor, but it’s not one that serves us well in the long term.
* We tell ourselves stories so we can create meaning out of challenging experiences. These stories go beyond thoughts in our minds; they can activate our sympathetic nervous system. These reactions include “fight, flight, freeze, fix, and fake,” and our brain cannot differentiate between perceived threats and real threats.
* Compartmentalizing as a coping strategy can completely break down under the crushing pressure of stress and trauma, leading to physical and mental exhaustion. This often causes painful conflicts not just at work, but also, in our personal lives and the relationships that mean the most to us.
* When a person’s attempt to compartmentalize breaks down, they are often accompanied by shame and stigma. They’re left isolated, disconnected, and wondering what is wrong with them. Rather than trying to hide these feelings, we should normalize them and provide support.
* Making better choices and healing from trauma is nearly impossible without self-compassion. Self-compassion means you put yourself higher on the list of priorities, recognize the need for self-care and well-being, and actually follow through with it.
* It will take a cultural shift to create more resilient teams, and it begins with prioritizing the well-being of all humans involved. Leaders need skills to manage stress, conflict, and performance issues, and companies must foster psychological safety, connection, and open promotion of mental health.
Resources
Navigating Life’s Sidewalks: A Poetic Reflection on Braking Patterns and Making New Choices by Dimple Dhabalia
Kristin Cox on LinkedIn
Dimple Dhabalia on the web | Instagram | Facebook | LinkedIn | Threads | Substack
Pre-order a copy of Tell Me My Story today!
Want to support this show and my work? Consider becoming a paid subscriber at dear humanitarian on Substack.
If you would like to support the launch of Tell Me My Story, you can learn more at rootsintheclouds.com/launchteam.
Subscribe onApple |Spotify |Amazon |Google


Get full access to dear HUMANitarian at dearhumanitarian.substack.com/subscribe

39 min

Top Podcasts In Business

REAL AF with Andy Frisella
Andy Frisella #100to0
The Ramsey Show
Ramsey Network
Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin
Money News Network
NerdWallet's Smart Money Podcast
NerdWallet Personal Finance
The Diary Of A CEO with Steven Bartlett
DOAC
Young and Profiting with Hala Taha
Hala Taha | YAP Media Network