1 hr 16 min

PART 4: Looking to the Women Who Came Before with Dr. Winifred Kessler Artemis

    • Wilderness

When Dr. Winifred Kessler started her career in wildlife biology, field positions weren't open to women. That changed when she was doing her PhD, and she went on to have a career that straddled academic and agency life. Wini was often "the first woman" on many different kinds of jobs. She talks about what that was like, and also shares stories of the women who came before us. There was Sheila Minor Huff, who was labeled "not identified" in a photo of other scientists taken during a whale conference. Wini also tells us about Annie Montague Alexander, a sugar heiress, explorer and naturalist whose collected specimens founded the University of California Museum of Paleontology and the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.
5:00 An era of wildlife biology when field jobs weren't open to women
9:00 The gender spread is far more equitable now, and that's (gradually) being reflected in the ranks of leadership
11:00 Serving as president of The Wildlife Society
13:00 "That's the best possible thing that I can hear, you know -- that it's made a difference."
16:00 Wini's article on Sheila Minor Huff: The Hidden Heroes in North American Conservation
18:00 When you set out to research/document the rise of women in conservation... where do you even start? Many exceptional women we omitted from early records of conservation/naturalism
20:00 Flashback: There was a time when studying the classics was in vogue, and science was the “lighter material”; Men studied classics and women (with their smaller brains, you know) were OK'd to study naturalism
21:00 Women often didn't get credit for the work they did
25:00 Speaking of exceptional women in conservation history: Annie Alexander was an intrepid explorer. The sugar heiress walked 700-some miles across modern-day Kenya collecting specimens and bringing meat to her entire party most days
28:00 Female friendship makes the world go ‘round, even in Victorian times
32:00 "Let's get the stories out there."
33:00 On being the first woman in a particular role
35:00 Women often play a role in changing the culture of teams within organizations; Different styles of leadership/engagement with colleagues
39:00 "Imposter syndrome is a real thing" - women are some of the best front-line soldiers when it comes to confronting imposter syndrome in other women
42:00 If you've done good work, moved the proverbial needle, and feel good with yourself -- the satisfaction is there. What's the value of being recognized for your work? 
47:00 How we present ourselves to others
49:00 "Your knowledge takes you the farthest when you can back up your ideas."
54:00 The genesis story of the Women of Wildlife group - anyone is welcome if they're willing to advance women in the profession
1:00 Volunteer leadership in conservation... "I find it very hard to say no."
1:02 Volunteer work often informs what you know for broader, professional work opportunities
1:04 With any potential volunteer opportunity, ask yourself, "Is this going to help me grow?"
1:07 What do we work on next?
1:12 "Women in Wildlife Science" anthology edited by Carol Chambers and Kerry Nicholson – Coming Fall 2022  - Pre-Order your copy here!
1:12 "Women in the Field: America's Pioneering Women Naturalists" by Marcia Bonta
1:13 Speaking of books... don't miss the Artemis book club, everyone! Currently reading: "Hunting and Fishing in the New South" by Scott Giltner. Register here!
1:15 Bass Tactics! Registration is open.

When Dr. Winifred Kessler started her career in wildlife biology, field positions weren't open to women. That changed when she was doing her PhD, and she went on to have a career that straddled academic and agency life. Wini was often "the first woman" on many different kinds of jobs. She talks about what that was like, and also shares stories of the women who came before us. There was Sheila Minor Huff, who was labeled "not identified" in a photo of other scientists taken during a whale conference. Wini also tells us about Annie Montague Alexander, a sugar heiress, explorer and naturalist whose collected specimens founded the University of California Museum of Paleontology and the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.
5:00 An era of wildlife biology when field jobs weren't open to women
9:00 The gender spread is far more equitable now, and that's (gradually) being reflected in the ranks of leadership
11:00 Serving as president of The Wildlife Society
13:00 "That's the best possible thing that I can hear, you know -- that it's made a difference."
16:00 Wini's article on Sheila Minor Huff: The Hidden Heroes in North American Conservation
18:00 When you set out to research/document the rise of women in conservation... where do you even start? Many exceptional women we omitted from early records of conservation/naturalism
20:00 Flashback: There was a time when studying the classics was in vogue, and science was the “lighter material”; Men studied classics and women (with their smaller brains, you know) were OK'd to study naturalism
21:00 Women often didn't get credit for the work they did
25:00 Speaking of exceptional women in conservation history: Annie Alexander was an intrepid explorer. The sugar heiress walked 700-some miles across modern-day Kenya collecting specimens and bringing meat to her entire party most days
28:00 Female friendship makes the world go ‘round, even in Victorian times
32:00 "Let's get the stories out there."
33:00 On being the first woman in a particular role
35:00 Women often play a role in changing the culture of teams within organizations; Different styles of leadership/engagement with colleagues
39:00 "Imposter syndrome is a real thing" - women are some of the best front-line soldiers when it comes to confronting imposter syndrome in other women
42:00 If you've done good work, moved the proverbial needle, and feel good with yourself -- the satisfaction is there. What's the value of being recognized for your work? 
47:00 How we present ourselves to others
49:00 "Your knowledge takes you the farthest when you can back up your ideas."
54:00 The genesis story of the Women of Wildlife group - anyone is welcome if they're willing to advance women in the profession
1:00 Volunteer leadership in conservation... "I find it very hard to say no."
1:02 Volunteer work often informs what you know for broader, professional work opportunities
1:04 With any potential volunteer opportunity, ask yourself, "Is this going to help me grow?"
1:07 What do we work on next?
1:12 "Women in Wildlife Science" anthology edited by Carol Chambers and Kerry Nicholson – Coming Fall 2022  - Pre-Order your copy here!
1:12 "Women in the Field: America's Pioneering Women Naturalists" by Marcia Bonta
1:13 Speaking of books... don't miss the Artemis book club, everyone! Currently reading: "Hunting and Fishing in the New South" by Scott Giltner. Register here!
1:15 Bass Tactics! Registration is open.

1 hr 16 min