247 episodes

A podcast about non-violent, MMT direct activism, introducing Modern Monetary Theory to the world, both online and in person.

Hosted by third-year MMT activist, Jeff Epstein.

This channel was formerly called People Conversations, by Citizens' Media TV (CMTV). All People Conversations interviews remain intact in this channel. Any MMT articles I write remain hosted on the CMTV website.

People Conversations by Citizens' Media TV Jeff Epstein

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    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

A podcast about non-violent, MMT direct activism, introducing Modern Monetary Theory to the world, both online and in person.

Hosted by third-year MMT activist, Jeff Epstein.

This channel was formerly called People Conversations, by Citizens' Media TV (CMTV). All People Conversations interviews remain intact in this channel. Any MMT articles I write remain hosted on the CMTV website.

    Full audio: John Harvey's Contending Perspectives: Chapter 00: Before we begin

    Full audio: John Harvey's Contending Perspectives: Chapter 00: Before we begin

    Here's the from where this audio came. Here's a list of links to in his 2021 book Contending Perspectives.

    • 17 min
    Ep136 [2/2]: Gabie Bond: Climate change, Torrens, and the job guarantee

    Ep136 [2/2]: Gabie Bond: Climate change, Torrens, and the job guarantee

    Welcome to episode 136 of Activist #MMT. Today's part two of my two-part conversation with Gabie Bond. Last month, in , we talked not about economics, but all about music. Gabie's a classically trained violist and I'm a classically trained singer. Today in part two, we talk about MMT, Torrens University, climate change, and the job guarantee. The Sustainable Prosperity Action Group has written a twenty-five-page report geared to introducing the job guarantee to the general public, and advocating for its implementation in national policy. Since recording this interview, a of this report has been released. Gabie is CEO of , which is the owner of the intellectual property – the academic content – of the Torrens graduate program. When another university or organization expresses interest in the program, it's Gabie who receives the call. She talks about her role in how the Torrens program came to be and in its day-to-day operations. Ever since considering applying to the program early this year, up until my most recent class meeting last night, Gabie has been there every step of the way. Regarding the job guarantee, Gabie and I have come to the conclusion that people should be allowed to choose to not participate, and should receive full benefits such as healthcare and childcare, and a check about half the size of the job guarantee wage. Even if people are legally allowed to not participate, I believe there will be social pressure applied (onto those who are capable of doing so), to participate. Clearly, everyone in the community benefits from the output of the job guarantee program, whether or not they individually participate. Someone has to make the stuff! That said, I want to clarify that I expect that most of those not wanting to participate in the job guarantee do in fact want to be productive, but are concerned the program would forbid their definition of what it means to be productive. After fifty years of vicious and brutal neoliberalism, it's an understandable concern. (Also, to be clear, Gabie and I both have more to learn, and the most important thing is that the job guarantee's wage and price anchor is not undermined.)Finally, I believe the skepticism of the job guarantee comes from a deep cynicism in the human condition, and the very possibility of the collective us. This has been terribly eroded by a lifetime of abuse at the hands of neoliberalism. Gabie's experience in orchestras and my own in choirs is an example of how it is indeed possible for people to come together and do beautiful things. It is possible to be vulnerable, and to open ourselves to being controlled by others, in a very limited and appropriate fashion. In fact, this kind of collectivism is necessary if we are to survive as a species. You can financially support this podcast by going to . For as little as a dollar a month, all patrons get exclusive, super-early access to , they can watch and ask questions live on weekly patron streams with my Torrens classmates, and they also have the opportunity to ask my academic guests questions (like these recent episodes with [Dirk Ehnts](https://activistmmt.libsyn.com/ep12812-dirk-ehnts-from-mainstream-to-mmt), [John Harvey](https://activistmmt.libsyn.com/ep1251316-john-harvey-mmt-the-uk-and-pound-sterling), and [Warren Mosler](https://activistmmt.libsyn.com/ep104-22-warren-mosler-answers-patron-questions-also-government-interface). In addition to this podcast, patrons also support the development of my large and growing collection of , and my journey through the Torrens graduate program. To become a patron, you can start by going to . Every little bit helps a little bit, and it all adds up to a lot. Thanks. And now, let's get right back to my conversation with Gabie Bond. Enjoy. Audio chapters 4:28 - Climate change and not wanting to fly- mass travel (and the Levy Summer Session) 12:38 - Join an Activist group 13:41 - Her role in the new Torrens University MMT + ecological economics graduate...

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Ep135 [1/2]: Gabie Bond: Talking all about music [NOT MMT]

    Ep135 [1/2]: Gabie Bond: Talking all about music [NOT MMT]

    Welcome to episode 135 of Activist #MMT. Today I talk with Gabie Bond. In part two, we talk about MMT, Torrens University, climate change, and the job guarantee. In hour one, however, we talk all about music. (To be clear, this first hour has little to do with economics.) As you heard before the opening music, Gabie is a classically trained violist. (Her accompanist and partner is a classically trained pianist.) I'm a classically trained singer, and for the past year have been learning guitar. Gabie and I talk about various topics, such as how the guitar has frets and the viola doesn't, and the consequences that has on our approach to the instrument and the notes. We talk about the differences between perfect and relative pitch, and how neither of us have the former. We also share some of our own experiences learning from, and teaching others. Gabie ends by describing how and why she let much of her professional music career go in order to become an activist, something which is greatly informed by MMT and ecological economics, which she learned thanks to meeting Steven Hail and Phil Lawn. In the show notes, you'll find several links to the things we mention, plus some examples of our playing. Out of my almost 140 episodes, this is the third entirely or substantially dedicated to music. Links to the other two, with and , can be found in the show notes. Getting to know MMTers outside of MMT, is important. It's basically an anthropological look at the background of MMTs adherents, which provides important context on the theory and movement as a whole. to do this by Fred Lee in his 2011 book, A History of Heterodox Economics Next month in part two, Gabie and I transition to discuss MMT, Torrens University, climate change, and a job guarantee. Gabie is CEO of Modern Money Lab, which is the owner of the intellectual property – the academic content – of the Torrens graduate program. She talks about her role in the program coming to life and in its day-to-day operations. And now, onto my conversation with Gabie Bond. Enjoy. Resources of the job guarantee report by the Sustainable Prosperity Action Group. Here's . Examples of Gabie's playing viola: Piece played before the opening music: Carl Stamitz viola concerto, accompanied by Alexander Hanysz Performing with the Australian Discovery Orchestra: from 17 songs Performing with the Australian Discovery Orchestra: Aaron Copland Gabie's partner is pianist Alexander Hanysz. , which includes music and digital art Gabie's sister Annie is a scientist and part of Scientist's Rebellion. She recently glued her hand to the front-door window of a fossil fuel company headquarters, as and covered by ABC and . Examples of my singing: Me singing by Barry Manilow Me singing every part except the lead vocal, of an a cappella arrangement I wrote of slave song called . I created the theme of a train to represent the slave's journey from earth to heaven, where he is finally free of his suffering. - - - (Here's a link to part . A list of the audio chapters in this episode can be found at the bottom of this post.) And now, onto my conversation with Gabie Bond. Enjoy. Audio chapters 5:25 - Hellos, summer here, winter there 7:24 - Music! 8:32 - Listened to each others' music 13:58 - Traveling by plane to rehearsal and reservations about it 15:46 - Jeff learning guitar, ambitious pieces like Maple Leaf Rag 21:29 - Learning an instrument as an adult (and teaching adults) 23:34 - Guitars have frets, violas don't 27:46 - Perfect pitch versus relative pitch 31:44 - Gabie's partner is a classical pianist, Flinders Street school of music 36:47 - Jeff playing a couple minutes of When She Loved Me on the guitar 40:18 - Jeff- finger-style versus strumming 42:36 - Why Gabie stopped being a musician and became an activist 52:31 - Do you choose to listen in your own time to the (classic) music that you play? 57:04 - Climate change and not wanting to fly- mass travel (and Levy Summer Session)...

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Full audio: Cowboy Economist #23: Is we is or is we ain't in a recession? (John Harvey)

    Full audio: Cowboy Economist #23: Is we is or is we ain't in a recession? (John Harvey)

    This is the full audio from the Cowboy Economist video #23: Is we is or is we ain't in a recession? Here is the link to the A link to the full audio of all Cowboy Economist videos can be found in the show notes to .

    • 7 min
    Ep134 [2/2]: Charles Hayden: Inflation and Warren's monopoly price setter

    Ep134 [2/2]: Charles Hayden: Inflation and Warren's monopoly price setter

    Welcome to episode 134 of Activist #MMT. Today's part two of my two-part conversation with Charles Hayden. In , Charles described how he created at least three important milestones in MMT history, and how Warren Mosler played a integral role his journey to understanding and accepting MMT. Today in part two, we discuss some of the many varied realistic views of inflation, and how each of them is connected by the fact that the national government is the monopoly price setter for the entire economy – whether they know it or not. This is one of the unique contributions of Modern Money Theory. The first realistic view of inflation is how it‘s not a disease or a symptom, but rather a measurement of some prices going up somewhere in the economy for some reason. It's not possible to know what the problem is without going out into the real world and discovering them for yourself. If you address those real-world problems, then those prices will naturally go down, which will in turn result in a lower measurement of inflation. This is not unlike how a thermometer measures the temperature of a sick person. The rabid desire to "lower inflation" is not unlike dunking the thermometer into a cup of ice, and ignoring the actual sickness of the actual patient, and doing nothing to help them. This is the idea behind lowering inflation by raising interest rates – if we lock all the starving people out of the kitchen, then we can truthfully say that "everyone who enters this kitchen gets a good meal." These are all examples of how real costs are pushed by those with the most onto those with the least – and subsequently onto the families and communities in which those people exist. A second realistic view is the class conflict theory of inflation. This is as originated by Marx and adopted by MMT. Inflation is essentially a battle between business owners and their workers, where one side fights to increase their profits, and the other fights to increase their wages. A wage-price spiral can only happen if we allow it to happen. The only way it can stop is if one side is empowered enough to prevent the other from pushing back. More broadly, this is a centuries-long battle between rich and poor to increase their power over the other. In all the above cases, outside of natural catastrophe, the government must be complicit in order for the inflation to persist. Currently, the government is essentially entirely on the side of the rich, business owners, and capitalists. So, in almost all cases, all real and financial costs are borne by workers and the poor. The idea that the government is the monopoly price setter, essentially means to me that: We as a collective are in control of our own destiny. The government is us as a collective. We have let it decay into the morass that it currently is. We've let the leash out way too far and now it's going to take a whole lot of effort in order to reign it back in. Regardless, no matter how unlikely or even impossible that task may be, if we are to survive, there is a no alternative. Outside of natural disaster, everything we do and don't do is a choice. We are choosing to go extinct. We could choose to not do that. And now, let's get right back to my conversation with Charles Hayden. Enjoy. Audio chapters 6:23 - Inflation- first thoughts 7:24 - Inflation is to the real world like a thermometer is to sickness (also, inflation the boogeyman) 12:34 - Government is the monopoly price setter. This is behind every other (valid) view of inflation 20:10 - Government is dog walker 24:07 - Foreign demand for a currency 26:40 - The government passively delegates its price setting powers (plus neglect and suppression) 38:29 - Inflation affects peoples lives 40:54 - Fortunate to learn MMT directly from Warren Mosler 42:34 - The language of Warren, versus other academics, versus activists, versus 46:08 - Warren's extreme examples as thought experiments 47:21 - MMT was all over TV (trying to do to MMT what they did to.

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Modern Money Doughnuts, seas2-ep12: Fadhel Kaboub: climate justice and monetary sovereignty (audio podcast)

    Modern Money Doughnuts, seas2-ep12: Fadhel Kaboub: climate justice and monetary sovereignty (audio podcast)

    Welcome to season 2, episode 12 of Modern Money Doughnuts (MMD), hosted by Steven Hail and Gabrielle Bond. MMD is an international show about modern monetary theory and ecological economics. This week, Steven and Gabie talk to Fadhel Kaboub, the President of the Global Institute for Sustainable Prosperity and consultant to Modern Money Lab , is one of the world's leading MMT economists and an expert on sustainability, and the global south. We asked Fadhel about what has been driving global food prices, about his role in climate change discussions among African politicians and diplomats. (All episodes of Modern Money Donuts can be found on by Modern Money Labs.) Here's from which this audio comes from. (The audio is unedited.) MMD is hosted by Kerberos Media, and the audio podcast is, for now, hosted by Activist #MMT. So if you'd like to be automatically notified of each new MMD episode, then subscribe to Activist #MMT on your favorite podcast platform.

    • 35 min

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